Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohnnie Tillmon Blackston
IN THE NEWS

Johnnie Tillmon Blackston

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1995 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Johnnie Tillmon-Blackston, a single mother in Watts turned leader of the 1960s welfare rights movement, has died. She was 69. Mrs. Tillmon-Blackston, a diabetic who used a wheelchair after the amputation of a foot and was on dialysis for the last four years, died Wednesday at Huntington Memorial Hospital. She went on welfare 30 years ago as a resident of the Nickerson Gardens housing project raising six children by herself. But Mrs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1995 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Johnnie Tillmon-Blackston, a single mother in Watts turned leader of the 1960s welfare rights movement, has died. She was 69. Mrs. Tillmon-Blackston, a diabetic who used a wheelchair after the amputation of a foot and was on dialysis for the last four years, died Wednesday at Huntington Memorial Hospital. She went on welfare 30 years ago as a resident of the Nickerson Gardens housing project raising six children by herself. But Mrs.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Johnnie Tillmon-Blackston joined the welfare rolls in Watts three decades ago, the pendulum of reform was swinging in favor of an impoverished group of single mothers who viewed welfare as an entitlement and resented government's prying eye. Back then, in the early 1960s, welfare officials routinely conducted midnight raids on homes, searching for evidence that a man lived in the house or looking for proof that a recipient was secretly living a life outside of poverty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1997 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Harvey Blackston packs his harmonicas, buffs his shoes with Vaseline and heads off to play the blues, he leaves more than the little house next to the railroad tracks in Watts. More than his late wife's grandchildren and the mangy dogs on the porch. He leaves what the years have crafted--a 69-year-old with diabetes and sleep apnea, a widower who walks with a cane. Back will be Harmonica Fats, roaring in a gravelly voice, blowing his harmonica and gliding smoothly on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1991 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sporting a gray fedora and a smile that speaks love's labor, Mark Shelby rocks back and forth with his bass--fingers deftly traveling along its frets and strings, drawing out the instrument's sonorous notes. Playing at the Watts Towers Arts Center in a jazz quartet, Shelby is about to get the opportunity to turn his labor of love into a full-time passion.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|