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NEWS
May 20, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
Last year in Las Vegas, after Johnny Chan won the World Series of Poker for two years straight and finished first in yet another big competition there, he made a generous prediction. In praising the man he'd just beaten, Chan revealed to a journalist that 24-year-old Phil Hellmuth had the makings of a world champion poker player. Chan's prediction came true remarkably fast. This week, Hellmuth defeated Chan in the '89 World Series of Poker at Binion's Horseshoe Casino, a meet that ended late Thursday afternoon after four grueling days of play.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Steve Rosenbloom
One of the biggest advantages the top pros hold over lesser players -- amateurs, especially -- is the ability to play after the flop. Each street brings more cards and more betting rounds. Pot odds change. So does the context of the board. The longer a hand goes, the better the chance the experienced player can further define the range of hands an opponent is likely to be holding. It's all about gathering information. Sometimes, however, all the information you need presents itself in the pre-flop betting, as poker legend Johnny Chan deduced in this hand from the World Poker Tour's $15,000-buy-in Doyle Brunson Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Las Vegas' Bellagio in 2008.
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NEWS
December 31, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER
Johnny Chan, the two-time world poker champ born in the People's Republic of China and reared in Houston, thought for sure he would be the first player ever to win the World Series of Poker three years in a row. Before last May's event, Chan had even declared himself to be "the most aggressive poker player in the world." But Chan finished second in the grueling, four-day meet, which attracted more than 100 players from around the world.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER
Johnny Chan, the two-time world poker champ born in the People's Republic of China and reared in Houston, thought for sure he would be the first player ever to win the World Series of Poker three years in a row. Before last May's event, Chan had even declared himself to be "the most aggressive poker player in the world." But Chan finished second in the grueling, four-day meet, which attracted more than 100 players from around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Steve Rosenbloom
One of the biggest advantages the top pros hold over lesser players -- amateurs, especially -- is the ability to play after the flop. Each street brings more cards and more betting rounds. Pot odds change. So does the context of the board. The longer a hand goes, the better the chance the experienced player can further define the range of hands an opponent is likely to be holding. It's all about gathering information. Sometimes, however, all the information you need presents itself in the pre-flop betting, as poker legend Johnny Chan deduced in this hand from the World Poker Tour's $15,000-buy-in Doyle Brunson Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Las Vegas' Bellagio in 2008.
NEWS
May 15, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
Of all the outrageous characters bouncing around the green felt court of high-stakes poker, Johnny Chan may be the oddest ball of all. Born in the People's Republic of China and reared in Houston, the two-time world poker champion is both the classically serene Asian and the boastful, heat-seeking Texan. In short, Chan may rank as the world's most inscrutable good ol' boy. Talk about a lethal combination. As Bobby Baldwin, world poker champ in 1982 and currently the president of the Golden Nugget Casino, says, "Johnny Chan is a fierce opponent and a first-class guy. He's real hospitable--as kind and nice a person as you'd want to meet--and at the same time he's got ice water flowing in his veins."
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | From Associated Press
Johnny Chan of Houston drew to a pair of nines on the last card Thursday to beat fellow Texan Frank Henderson and win the $625,000 first prize in the 18th annual World Series of Poker. Chan's nines topped a pair of fours for Henderson, who had put in all of his $300,000 in chips in the showdown hand that climaxed the four-day unlimited Hold 'Em event at Binion's Horseshoe Club. "It feels like a miracle," said Chan, 29, who outlasted 151 other poker professionals for the win.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1993
The U.S. attorney's office announced Thursday that an Alhambra man had been sentenced to 46 months in federal prison and fined $7,500 after being found guilty of attempting to extort payments from an Orange County restaurant owner by the use of vandalism and threats of violence. Federal prosecutor John J. Byrne Jr.
NEWS
December 31, 1992
A Vietnamese-Chinese gang member from Alhambra has been found guilty in federal court of extorting payments from an Orange County restaurant owner by threatening vandalism and violence. Johnny Zin Chan, 30, was convicted Dec. 22 in U.S. District Court. He faces a maximum 20-year prison sentence. Chan attempted to extort $16,200 from Jane Phunt Sam, owner of Sam's Paradise Restaurant in Laguna Beach, according to Assistant U.S. Atty. John J. Byrne Jr., who prosecuted the case.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Professional video gaming is set to debut on cable television this year, potentially paving the way for the reigning game players to become as familiar to American households as the faces of Johnny Chan or Annie Duke in televised poker. Major League Gaming, the world's largest organized video game league, on Monday announced a programming deal in which USA Network will air seven one-hour episodes in the fall featuring the pro circuit.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
Last year in Las Vegas, after Johnny Chan won the World Series of Poker for two years straight and finished first in yet another big competition there, he made a generous prediction. In praising the man he'd just beaten, Chan revealed to a journalist that 24-year-old Phil Hellmuth had the makings of a world champion poker player. Chan's prediction came true remarkably fast. This week, Hellmuth defeated Chan in the '89 World Series of Poker at Binion's Horseshoe Casino, a meet that ended late Thursday afternoon after four grueling days of play.
NEWS
May 15, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
Of all the outrageous characters bouncing around the green felt court of high-stakes poker, Johnny Chan may be the oddest ball of all. Born in the People's Republic of China and reared in Houston, the two-time world poker champion is both the classically serene Asian and the boastful, heat-seeking Texan. In short, Chan may rank as the world's most inscrutable good ol' boy. Talk about a lethal combination. As Bobby Baldwin, world poker champ in 1982 and currently the president of the Golden Nugget Casino, says, "Johnny Chan is a fierce opponent and a first-class guy. He's real hospitable--as kind and nice a person as you'd want to meet--and at the same time he's got ice water flowing in his veins."
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
World street food scene: Chef Bryant Ng of Spice Table is representing Los Angeles on the board of the first World Street Food Congress set for May 31 in Singapore, a 10-day event celebrating the richness and vibrancy of street food cultures. The event includes the World Street Food Jamboree with up to 40 hawkers, a two-day conference for the exchange of ideas and an awards event to recognize top global street food players. The board also includes Anthony Bourdain, Saveur's James Oseland and Chinese TV food host Johnny Chan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1992 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gang member was convicted Wednesday of extorting money from an Orange County restaurateur, threatening to harm her children if she did not pay. Johnny Zin Chan, 30, of Alhambra faces up to 20 years in federal prison when he is sentenced March 15 in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. He was found guilty of extortion charges stemming from repeated threats and acts of vandalism at the victim's restaurant and home in 1989. Federal prosecutor John J. Byrne Jr.
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