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Johnny Cochran

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NEWS
November 1, 2000 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Anthony Dwain Lee and others were laughing at a joke near the end of a Halloween party when a police officer shined his flashlight at them through a glass door and fired nine shots as Lee turned toward the light, holding a fake gun, lawyer Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. said Tuesday, based on witness interviews.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2012 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Members of the O.J. Simpson defense "dream team" were back in action 17 years after the legendary murder trial, this time defending the name of their late colleague, Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. It all started last week in New York, when former Simpson prosecutor Christopher A. Darden alleged to a law school audience that Cochran tampered with the infamous "bloody glove," a key piece of evidence in the murder case. During the trial in the stabbing deaths of Simpson's former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ronald Lyle Goldman, Simpson tried on bloody gloves.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1995 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months as the chief architect of O.J. Simpson's defense, it was attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr.'s turn to sit in the hot seat. The famed attorney, his Simpson trial in early recess Friday, journeyed to another courtroom, where he took the witness stand and faced a friendly grilling--probably unlike what he might receive from his noted adversary, prosecutor Marcia Clark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2012
Jock Smith Law partner of Johnnie Cochran Jock Smith, 63, who was a law partner with the late Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., died Sunday of an apparent heart attack while watching television at his home in Montgomery, Ala., said his law partner Sam Cherry. Smith won what the National Law Journal called America's largest civil verdict in 2004, a $1.6-billion judgment against Southwestern Life Insurance and one of its agents. The suit was later settled out of court for an undisclosed amount for a mother of three who alleged she paid the agent thousands of dollars for an insurance policy that didn't exist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1995
I couldn't stop laughing upon reading about Johnnie Cochran Jr. making a book deal "slightly exceeding" Marcia Clark's $4.2 million contract (Nov. 15). It is an amount of money that never would have entered Cochran's mind had it not been for his petty attempt to outdo Clark's fee. Cochran's arrogance knows no boundaries and if he thought any more highly of himself he would be, well--O.J. Simpson. MICHAEL GIVENS Encino Regarding the aftermath of the Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman murders: The consensus appears to be that everybody in the whole world may profit from the murders, except Simpson himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2005
Tim Rutten's history of Johnnie Cochran as being uniquely L.A. was instructional, up to a point ["Johnnie Cochran: L.A. Quintessential," April 2]. Cochran may've been a great guy and a brilliant lawyer, but he'll always be remembered for playing the race card in the Simpson case. That wrongheaded verdict is part of Cochran's legacy. So when Rutten tries to justify it as an "L.A. Thing" -- a sort of proud Los Angeles chauvinism -- he insults everyone who lives or was born in L.A. Ron Fineman Valencia
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2005 | TIM RUTTEN
In one of the greatest of his late poems, "The Municipal Gallery Revisited," Yeats described coming suddenly upon one of his friends' portraits: "And here's John Synge himself, that rooted man." That was the line that came to mind this week, when, after a long illness, Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. died at the untimely age of 67. We were friends for many years and collaborated on his bestselling memoir, "Journey to Justice." O.J.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2003 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. has himself a honey of a case. The lawyer who helped win O.J. Simpson's acquittal on murder charges made his debut Monday as a member of a new legal team for the family suing Walt Disney Co. over Winnie the Pooh royalties. And on the other side of the courtroom? Daniel Petrocelli, who persuaded a civil jury to hold Simpson liable for the deaths of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman.
BOOKS
January 5, 1997
To the Editor: Professor Randall Kennedy's mean-spirited review of "Journey to Justice" by Johnnie Cochran Jr. with Tim Rutten ("Playing to the Crowd," Oct. 13), is a disservice to Cochran, the public and the cause of promoting open and civil dialogue on matters of great national concern. We have no objection to a critique of the literary value or intellectual content of Cochran's book. Kennedy, however, goes well beyond expressing his dissatisfaction with the book and makes a series of ad hominem comments and unsupported allegations that unfairly malign Cochran's honesty and integrity.
OPINION
February 25, 2006
I was surprised to read about City Councilman Herb J. Wesson's proposal to rename a short portion of a street in Los Angeles after the late attorney Johnnie Cochran (Feb. 20). There is already a street named Cochran running through the city's 10th District, which he represents. I know because I live on it. Renaming this street for Cochran makes much more sense than creating another, confusingly similar street name nearby. ANTHONY SBARDELLATI Los Angeles It's great that a school's being named after the late Johnnie Cochran.
OPINION
June 4, 2011 | Tim Rutten
Los Angeles is a city that lives in the present and looks to the future. Time passes here in a blur, and there's usually little appetite for weaving together the strands of memory into the stories we call history — and few hungry to hear them when we do. Even so, Thursday's unexpected death of the onetime Black Panther, Elmer G. "Geronimo" Pratt, is one of those events worth pausing to consider because he was half of one of our city's most fascinating...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2010 | By Dan Weikel and David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
The push to overhaul restaurants, beverage stands and gift stores at Los Angeles International Airport took a major step forward Monday when a special City Council panel approved three retail contracts to a joint venture that features former Lakers star Magic Johnson and the widow of attorney Johnnie Cochran. The five-member Board of Referred Powers voted 4 to 1 to give the contacts to a partnership involving the Hudson Group, Magic Johnson Enterprises and Concourse Ventures, which is headed by Dale Mason Cochran.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2010 | By Steve Harvey, Los Angeles Times
It's unlikely that Wyatt Earp, the gruff frontier lawman, and Johnnie Cochran, the smooth-talking defense attorney, would have been friends had they lived in the same era. In a way, they've even been on opposite sides in death — in a matter involving a school in midtown Los Angeles. In the 1990s there was a movement to rename Mount Vernon Junior High after Earp because it occupied the site of the gunfighter's last residence at 4004 W. 17th St. "I like the sound of 'Wyatt Earp Junior High,'" City Councilman Nate Holden said at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2007 | Sandy Banks, Times Staff Writer
Cedars-Sinai neurosurgeon Keith Black has counseled thousands of patients with brain tumors. As one of the preeminent doctors in his field, he performs hundreds of brain surgeries each year. But few things have been more wrenching, he says, than watching his friend, attorney Johnnie Cochran, succumb to one of the deadliest types of brain tumors two years ago. On Thursday, Black presided over the opening of the Johnnie L. Cochran Jr.
OPINION
February 25, 2006
I was surprised to read about City Councilman Herb J. Wesson's proposal to rename a short portion of a street in Los Angeles after the late attorney Johnnie Cochran (Feb. 20). There is already a street named Cochran running through the city's 10th District, which he represents. I know because I live on it. Renaming this street for Cochran makes much more sense than creating another, confusingly similar street name nearby. ANTHONY SBARDELLATI Los Angeles It's great that a school's being named after the late Johnnie Cochran.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2005
Tim Rutten's history of Johnnie Cochran as being uniquely L.A. was instructional, up to a point ["Johnnie Cochran: L.A. Quintessential," April 2]. Cochran may've been a great guy and a brilliant lawyer, but he'll always be remembered for playing the race card in the Simpson case. That wrongheaded verdict is part of Cochran's legacy. So when Rutten tries to justify it as an "L.A. Thing" -- a sort of proud Los Angeles chauvinism -- he insults everyone who lives or was born in L.A. Ron Fineman Valencia
OPINION
April 9, 2005
Re "An A-List Turnout Does Cochran Justice," April 7: I was subpoenaed to testify in the O.J. Simpson case. It concerned an appearance by Simpson on a television show I produced. It was an insignificant matter, and I didn't think I was headed for instant fame in this gigantic trial. But I showed up and was searched, fingerprinted and told to wait in the corridor. Legal aides and handlers were everywhere, but just then Johnnie Cochran showed up. He came over to me, introduced himself (really!
OPINION
April 9, 2005
Re "An A-List Turnout Does Cochran Justice," April 7: I was subpoenaed to testify in the O.J. Simpson case. It concerned an appearance by Simpson on a television show I produced. It was an insignificant matter, and I didn't think I was headed for instant fame in this gigantic trial. But I showed up and was searched, fingerprinted and told to wait in the corridor. Legal aides and handlers were everywhere, but just then Johnnie Cochran showed up. He came over to me, introduced himself (really!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2005 | TIM RUTTEN
In one of the greatest of his late poems, "The Municipal Gallery Revisited," Yeats described coming suddenly upon one of his friends' portraits: "And here's John Synge himself, that rooted man." That was the line that came to mind this week, when, after a long illness, Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. died at the untimely age of 67. We were friends for many years and collaborated on his bestselling memoir, "Journey to Justice." O.J.
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