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Johnny Copeland

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some of Johnny Copeland's fans might suggest that his intense but sophisticated blues singing and guitar playing are heroic on their own merits. But by the simple fact that he continues to play live, Copeland is heroic in another sense. The 59-year-old blues man has cardiomyopathy--a condition that requires a device to pump blood to his heart. But it's only a temporary aid; Copeland is in dire need of a transplant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some of Johnny Copeland's fans might suggest that his intense but sophisticated blues singing and guitar playing are heroic on their own merits. But by the simple fact that he continues to play live, Copeland is heroic in another sense. The 59-year-old blues man has cardiomyopathy--a condition that requires a device to pump blood to his heart. But it's only a temporary aid; Copeland is in dire need of a transplant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
The African roots of American blues have always been acknowledged by music scholars, but it took Johnny Copeland to put that intellectual concept to the acid test. The Texas-born blues guitarist/singer went to Africa to record his latest album. "Bringin' It All Back Home" (on Rounder Records) was recorded in two days during a weeklong stay in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, in March, 1984. And it wasn't easy.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | JIM WASHBURN
Sometimes it seems that the people who have the most trouble getting used to blues festivals are blues musicians. With years of practically living in dark smoky clubs, their music echoing off dank walls until closing time, some blues players might just be disoriented by such festival features as daylight and fresh air. Some may just be numbed by decades of grueling touring, so much so that they fall right into their rote "how you all tonight?" patter at festivals, even if it's high noon.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Kevin Morrow has a bad case of the blues--and, like Typhoid Mary, he's out to infect everyone he meets. His partner in Falk & Morrow Talent, Malcolm Falk, has already fallen victim to the disease. For more than a year, the two promoters have brought a legion of blues acts to nightclubs all over the county. The Belly Up Tavern also has contracted blues fever.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | JIM WASHBURN
Sometimes it seems that the people who have the most trouble getting used to blues festivals are blues musicians. With years of practically living in dark smoky clubs, their music echoing off dank walls until closing time, some blues players might just be disoriented by such festival features as daylight and fresh air. Some may just be numbed by decades of grueling touring, so much so that they fall right into their rote "how you all tonight?" patter at festivals, even if it's high noon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1999
You don't hear many 19-year-olds saying, "It sure would be nice of the media paid more attention to timeless music like the blues." Of course, Shemekia Copeland, who said it, isn't any 19-year-old. She's the daughter of bluesman Johnny Copeland and a rising blues artist in her own right. The singer, whom her father nicknamed "Bootsy," plays tonight in Santa Ana, returning to the county after appearing here in February. * * Galaxy Concert Theatre, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana. 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
RANDY WESTON / MELBA LISTON "Volcano Blues" Antilles * * * * The partnership of pianist-composer Weston and arranger Liston makes for a joyful reunion here. Although almost every track has a blues base, between them they inject a remarkable variety of moods, modes, meters and tempos. "Blues for Strayhorn" truly sounds like a Strayhorn work.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2003 | From Associated Press
Bob Dylan is among the artists nominated for a W.C. Handy Award for blues song of the year. Dylan, better known for his folk and rock work, was nominated for his first Handy Award as songwriter of "Stepchild," recorded by Solomon Burke on the album "Don't Give Up on Me." The Blues Foundation, a nonprofit group that promotes the genre, announced the nominations in 25 categories Monday. Shemekia Copeland and Magic Slim & the Teardrops led the list with five nominations each.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The deaths in recent years of Luther Allison, Junior Wells, Albert King, Albert Collins and Johnny Copeland have not only saddened blues fans, but also forced them to consider how much longer they'll be able to enjoy such elder statesmen as B.B. King and John Lee Hooker. On the other hand, it's all the more reason to focus attention on a new generation of blues players who are helping keep the music alive and well.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Kevin Morrow has a bad case of the blues--and, like Typhoid Mary, he's out to infect everyone he meets. His partner in Falk & Morrow Talent, Malcolm Falk, has already fallen victim to the disease. For more than a year, the two promoters have brought a legion of blues acts to nightclubs all over the county. The Belly Up Tavern also has contracted blues fever.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
The African roots of American blues have always been acknowledged by music scholars, but it took Johnny Copeland to put that intellectual concept to the acid test. The Texas-born blues guitarist/singer went to Africa to record his latest album. "Bringin' It All Back Home" (on Rounder Records) was recorded in two days during a weeklong stay in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, in March, 1984. And it wasn't easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1993 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Etta James tops an eclectic lineup of blues and zydeco acts performing in September at the first Orange County Blues Festival, event organizers announced Tuesday. Some of the 19 acts at the three-day event hail from the dance-hall circuit of Southwest Louisiana and the legendary Chicago blues club circuit. Southern California's blues community will also be well represented, festival organizers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Could there really be room for another blues festival in Southern California? The answer from the well-attended first two days of the Orange County Blues Festival is a resounding yes. The new event, held in Heritage Park overlooking Dana Point Harbor, lacked the array of headliners that the 14-year-old Long Beach Blues Festival offered earlier this month, but was no less heavy with strong performances.
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