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Johnny Guitar Watson

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September 3, 2008 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
Brad Meltzer's hot thriller "The Book of Lies" was published Tuesday and it has arrived with a unique companion soundtrack. Because a key element in the book is Meltzer's theory about the origins of Superman, the CD includes several pop songs that have referenced the Man of Steel, including R.E.M.'s "Superman," Five for Fighting's "Superman (It's Not Easy)" and Bonnie Tyler's "Holding Out for a Hero." Kal-El and his earthly alter ego, Clark Kent, have been popular topics for pop, rock, R&B, blues and hip-hop artists, and just as cinematic treatments of Superdude have evolved over time, so have the musical invocations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2008 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
Brad Meltzer's hot thriller "The Book of Lies" was published Tuesday and it has arrived with a unique companion soundtrack. Because a key element in the book is Meltzer's theory about the origins of Superman, the CD includes several pop songs that have referenced the Man of Steel, including R.E.M.'s "Superman," Five for Fighting's "Superman (It's Not Easy)" and Bonnie Tyler's "Holding Out for a Hero." Kal-El and his earthly alter ego, Clark Kent, have been popular topics for pop, rock, R&B, blues and hip-hop artists, and just as cinematic treatments of Superdude have evolved over time, so have the musical invocations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Johnny "Guitar" Watson, seminal rhythm and blues recording artist whose flamboyant technique influenced Jimi Hendrix and Frank Zappa, has died at the age of 61. Watson, who sometimes referred to himself as the "Gangster of Love," the title of a hit album he first made in 1958 and reprised in 1977, died Friday night of a heart attack during a performance in Yokohama, Japan.
BOOKS
January 11, 1998 | MARC CARNEGIE, Marc Carnegie is a critic living in London
For jazz and soul fans, the arrival of the new year brings several superb coffee table books about the music. I'm happy to report that this year's selection is especially fine. Paul Trynka's "Portrait of the Blues," with photographs by Val Wilmer, is the best of the lot; indeed, it's one of the best books ever published about the blues. Trynka wrote that he was aiming to produce something as "honest and unfiltered as possible," and here it is--America's greatest blues musicians, some legends and some barely known, telling their stories in their own words.
BOOKS
January 11, 1998 | MARC CARNEGIE, Marc Carnegie is a critic living in London
For jazz and soul fans, the arrival of the new year brings several superb coffee table books about the music. I'm happy to report that this year's selection is especially fine. Paul Trynka's "Portrait of the Blues," with photographs by Val Wilmer, is the best of the lot; indeed, it's one of the best books ever published about the blues. Trynka wrote that he was aiming to produce something as "honest and unfiltered as possible," and here it is--America's greatest blues musicians, some legends and some barely known, telling their stories in their own words.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1999 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With his rootsy music and tales of imperfect heroes tangling with forces beyond their control, singer-songwriter Dave Alvin was the model of Everyman during his show Saturday at the Roxy--although Everyman doesn't usually invoke both Chicago bluesman Magic Sam and French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre when describing one of his songs. There were surprising juxtapositions at every turn during the guitarist's rare hometown performance with his quartet, the Guilty Men.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Johnny (Guitar) Watson wasn't about to waste his time Friday at the House of Blues performing a lame nostalgia show. Within minutes, this funk-blues party master had waded deep into the crowd with his guitar, firing off one explosive blues lead after another. Dressed in a black fedora and great big shades, Watson's appearance was like something right out of the '70s, when he was a regular hit maker with songs like "A Real Mother for Ya."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1996
Mercer Ellington, 76, Jan. 8 Don Simpson, 52, Jan. 19 Gerry Mulligan, 68, Jan. 20 Jerry Siegel, 81, Jan. 28 Gene Kelly, 83, Feb. 2 Audrey Meadows, 69, Feb. 3 Martin Balsam, 76, Feb. 13 McLean Stevenson, 66, Feb. 15 Brownie McGhee, 80, Feb. 16 Morton Gould, 82, Feb. 20 Haing S. Ngor, 55, Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Johnny "Guitar" Watson, seminal rhythm and blues recording artist whose flamboyant technique influenced Jimi Hendrix and Frank Zappa, has died at the age of 61. Watson, who sometimes referred to himself as the "Gangster of Love," the title of a hit album he first made in 1958 and reprised in 1977, died Friday night of a heart attack during a performance in Yokohama, Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
How did a master of the Siberian art of throat singing wind up jamming with Frank Zappa and his friends? Kongar-ol Ondar, 51, who died July 25 of complications from a brain hemorrhage in the Russian republic of Tuva, had been invited to ride in the Rose Parade in 1993. At a concert in Pasadena that evening, cartoonist Matt Groening heard him sing and told his friend Zappa about Ondar's astonishing ability to sing two or more notes simultaneously. Zappa, the eclectic musician-composer of the '60s band Mothers of Invention, was ill with cancer but asked if Ondar could sing for him at his home in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1996 | CHEO HODARI COKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walking onstage Saturday at the Cal State Long Beach Athletic Field, legendary blues singer Bobby Blue Bland looked out over the sea of faces and smiled. Hooting and hollering, the crowd acted as if it was honored to be in his presence. After 44 years of recording, Bland is only starting to get the kind of accolades he deserves, and he basked in the attention before singing his heart out for 80 minutes.
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