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Johnny Longden

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2003
Johnny Longden, who won the Triple Crown riding Count Fleet in 1943 and was the only jockey to ride and train Kentucky Derby winners, died Friday on his 96th birthday. Full coverage in Sports.
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SPORTS
February 15, 2003 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Longden, once horse racing's winningest jockey, and the only horseman to win the Kentucky Derby as a rider and a trainer, died Friday in his sleep, on his 96th birthday. Longden, who retired as a jockey in 1966 and from training horses in 1990, suffered a stroke last August and had been bedridden in his Banning home for the last four months. Of all the horse races Johnny Longden won -- 6,032 as a jockey and 370 as a trainer -- two counted the most.
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SPORTS
September 10, 1989 | BOB WOLF
He broke the record here on Labor Day 19 years ago, and not even Father Time has been able to catch him. Bill Shoemaker remembers little about victory No. 6,033 at Del Mar, the one that broke a tie with Johnny Longden and made him the winningest jockey of all time. Through a 41-year career in which he has won everything of consequence except the Triple Crown, he hasn't paid much attention to details. "I rode a horse named Dares J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2003
Johnny Longden, who won the Triple Crown riding Count Fleet in 1943 and was the only jockey to ride and train Kentucky Derby winners, died Friday on his 96th birthday. Full coverage in Sports.
SPORTS
July 28, 1989
Funeral services for Hazel Longden, 64, wife of trainer and former jockey Johnny Longden, will be held Tuesday at Forest Lawn Cemetery at 2 p.m. She died Thursday in Arcadia after a long battle with cancer.
SPORTS
January 10, 1995 | BILL CHRISTINE
Johnny Longden had been taking an afternoon nap in Banning on Monday when a reporter called to tell him that he and fellow jockey Eddie Arcaro would be receiving special Eclipse Awards. They combined for 10,811 riding victories, with Longden, at the 6,032 mark, retiring from the saddle in 1966, five years after Arcaro. "That's very nice," Longden said of his award. "I'm sure Eddie's happy too. He was a great rider, one of the best, and we've stayed good friends.
SPORTS
March 12, 1999
OK, here's your time machine. Climb in and dial up any 20th century sports event. But you only get one round trip. Yikes, what to pick? * The 1938 Louis-Schmeling rematch? * Red Grange's five touchdowns against Michigan in 1924? * Bobby Thomson's 1951 pennant-winning homer? Here's a tough one to beat: the last ride of Johnny Longden. He rode 6,032 winners over a 40-year career, including 452 stakes races. But it was No. 6,032 folks remember most.
SPORTS
March 12, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Santa Anita turf club, Don Pierce was yelling for George Royal as loud as anybody, even though he had bet $100 on Hill Rise, the horse he would have been riding if the stewards hadn't suspended him. This was 25 years ago, on March 12, 1966, when Johnny Longden, rode the 32,413th and last race of a 40-year career and, at 59, won the San Juan Capistrano Handicap by a nose on George Royal.
SPORTS
February 15, 2003 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Longden, once horse racing's winningest jockey, and the only horseman to win the Kentucky Derby as a rider and a trainer, died Friday in his sleep, on his 96th birthday. Longden, who retired as a jockey in 1966 and from training horses in 1990, suffered a stroke last August and had been bedridden in his Banning home for the last four months. Of all the horse races Johnny Longden won -- 6,032 as a jockey and 370 as a trainer -- two counted the most.
SPORTS
August 10, 1999 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day after Christmas in 1966, Laffit Pincay, three days short of his 20th birthday, rode his first winner at Santa Anita. The 2-year-old colt, at 5-1, was named Rising Market, and there on the favored runner-up, a nose short at the wire, was Bill Shoemaker. Sometime early next year, as sure as Panama has a canal, Pincay figures to be nosing out Shoemaker again, only this time it won't be in a mere $7,000 six-furlong allowance race. Most likely at the same Santa Anita, Pincay will ride his 8,834th winner, and one of the most durable records in sports will fall: Shoemaker's 8,833 victories.
SPORTS
March 12, 1999
OK, here's your time machine. Climb in and dial up any 20th century sports event. But you only get one round trip. Yikes, what to pick? * The 1938 Louis-Schmeling rematch? * Red Grange's five touchdowns against Michigan in 1924? * Bobby Thomson's 1951 pennant-winning homer? Here's a tough one to beat: the last ride of Johnny Longden. He rode 6,032 winners over a 40-year career, including 452 stakes races. But it was No. 6,032 folks remember most.
SPORTS
January 10, 1995 | BILL CHRISTINE
Johnny Longden had been taking an afternoon nap in Banning on Monday when a reporter called to tell him that he and fellow jockey Eddie Arcaro would be receiving special Eclipse Awards. They combined for 10,811 riding victories, with Longden, at the 6,032 mark, retiring from the saddle in 1966, five years after Arcaro. "That's very nice," Longden said of his award. "I'm sure Eddie's happy too. He was a great rider, one of the best, and we've stayed good friends.
SPORTS
June 10, 1993 | JIM MURRAY
They called him "the Pumper" because of the peculiar urging motion he used at the horse's withers. He was the best there ever was at holding a horse's run together on the front end. Rival rider Ray York said it all when he noted, "John is rough competition. You can get to him. You can't get by him." He was such a magnificent judge of pace, you would have thought he had a dashboard across the horse's back.
SPORTS
January 24, 1992 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pitfalls of being a contract rider for a racing stable are unavoidable, and Pat Valenzuela, who has signed on as owner Allen Paulson's first-call jockey for this year, cannot expect to escape them. The best example of a jockey getting himself trapped because of a contract is Heliodoro Gustines, who in the 1970s was the regular rider for Martha Gerry's Forego, while his first obligation was to John Hay (Jock) Whitney's Greentree Stable.
SPORTS
March 12, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Santa Anita turf club, Don Pierce was yelling for George Royal as loud as anybody, even though he had bet $100 on Hill Rise, the horse he would have been riding if the stewards hadn't suspended him. This was 25 years ago, on March 12, 1966, when Johnny Longden, rode the 32,413th and last race of a 40-year career and, at 59, won the San Juan Capistrano Handicap by a nose on George Royal.
SPORTS
June 10, 1993 | JIM MURRAY
They called him "the Pumper" because of the peculiar urging motion he used at the horse's withers. He was the best there ever was at holding a horse's run together on the front end. Rival rider Ray York said it all when he noted, "John is rough competition. You can get to him. You can't get by him." He was such a magnificent judge of pace, you would have thought he had a dashboard across the horse's back.
SPORTS
January 24, 1992 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pitfalls of being a contract rider for a racing stable are unavoidable, and Pat Valenzuela, who has signed on as owner Allen Paulson's first-call jockey for this year, cannot expect to escape them. The best example of a jockey getting himself trapped because of a contract is Heliodoro Gustines, who in the 1970s was the regular rider for Martha Gerry's Forego, while his first obligation was to John Hay (Jock) Whitney's Greentree Stable.
SPORTS
February 2, 1990 | BILL CHRISTINE
Bill Shoemaker says he won't make a bet on Patchy Groundfog, the 7-year-old chestnut he'll ride Saturday in the race that ends Little Big Man's extraordinary 42-year career. Lack of confidence? Hardly. Shoemaker, who had his pick of any horse that ran according to the unusual conditions of the race, let his agent, Bill (Bear) Barisoff, choose his mount, and Patchy Groundfog, who will run coupled with Ofanto, has been established as the 2-1 favorite by Jeff Tufts, the Santa Anita linemaker.
SPORTS
September 10, 1989 | BOB WOLF
He broke the record here on Labor Day 19 years ago, and not even Father Time has been able to catch him. Bill Shoemaker remembers little about victory No. 6,033 at Del Mar, the one that broke a tie with Johnny Longden and made him the winningest jockey of all time. Through a 41-year career in which he has won everything of consequence except the Triple Crown, he hasn't paid much attention to details. "I rode a horse named Dares J.
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