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Johnny Mandel

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012 | By Kirk Silsbee, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 2004, the late jazz and recording session pianist Mike Melvoin spoke about his work. His storied career in the studios included playing organ on "That's Life" for Frank Sinatra and on "Good Vibrations" for the Beach Boys, jazz piano on "Nighthawks at the Diner" by Tom Waits and many other high points. But the milestones were few and far between. On many studio dates, musicianly camaraderie outweighed the music at hand. "When I played a Johnny Mandel date," Melvoin clarified, "I realized: This is why I became a musician.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013
A four-day festival of concerts, rare film screenings and panel discussions, "Jazz Themes from Hollywood" looks back at a golden age where jazz merged with the silver screen. Among the many offerings are a tribute to Dave Brubeck's "Dave Digs Disney," a tribute to Johnny Mandel and an evening of jazz-infused film noir led by the great Gerald Wilson, who will direct a take on Duke Ellington's "Anatomy of a Murder. " Prices vary; full schedule and ticket information available at (562) 200-5477 and http://www.lajazzinstitute.org .
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
Johnny Mandel's fame has not yet caught up with his talent. After almost 30 years as a composer for motion pictures (including "The Sandpiper," from which the love theme known as "The Shadow of Your Smile" won him both an Academy Award and a Grammy), the former name-band trombonist remains relatively obscure to those for whom Henry Mancini and Quincy Jones are household names.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012 | By Kirk Silsbee, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 2004, the late jazz and recording session pianist Mike Melvoin spoke about his work. His storied career in the studios included playing organ on "That's Life" for Frank Sinatra and on "Good Vibrations" for the Beach Boys, jazz piano on "Nighthawks at the Diner" by Tom Waits and many other high points. But the milestones were few and far between. On many studio dates, musicianly camaraderie outweighed the music at hand. "When I played a Johnny Mandel date," Melvoin clarified, "I realized: This is why I became a musician.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for Calendar
Even if you don't recognize Johnny Mandel's name, it's a fair bet that you've heard some of his music. Mandel, the songwriter/arranger/soundtrack composer, wrote the lasting melodies to such evergreen standards as "The Shadow of Your Smile," which won the Academy Award in 1965 for best song (in "The Sandpiper"), "A Time for Love" and "Suicide Is Painless: The Theme from M*A*S*H." Mandel's profile is low because he's not a performer. He used to play trombone but gave it up 30 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013
A four-day festival of concerts, rare film screenings and panel discussions, "Jazz Themes from Hollywood" looks back at a golden age where jazz merged with the silver screen. Among the many offerings are a tribute to Dave Brubeck's "Dave Digs Disney," a tribute to Johnny Mandel and an evening of jazz-infused film noir led by the great Gerald Wilson, who will direct a take on Duke Ellington's "Anatomy of a Murder. " Prices vary; full schedule and ticket information available at (562) 200-5477 and http://www.lajazzinstitute.org .
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1996 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Shadow of Your Smile," "A Time for Love," "Emily," "Where Do You Start?" "You Are There"--these superb melodies are just a sampling of the creations of one brilliant artist: Johnny Mandel. Those songs and many others will ring out Sunday at the Jazz Bakery in Culver City during "To Johnny Mandel With Love," a tribute to the Oscar-winning composer that will raise funds for the nonprofit Bakery.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Almost since the dawn of the 20th Century, the lingua franca most vividly illustrative of our social attitudes as a nation, our modus vivendi, has been the popular song. Through its lyrics we can detect beliefs and fads and fashions; its melodies reflect our aesthetic values, for better or worse. Is the American popular song still a durable yardstick, as it has been since the days of player pianos and primitive Victrolas? Or is it in danger of irrelevance and eventual extinction?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1996 | Don Heckman
Three film-related albums from Verve offer an interesting cross-section of the manner in which jazz-oriented composers were starting to bring the sounds as well as the sensibilities of jazz to the motion picture world in the '60s. Jazz and movies have had a close, if not always intimate, relationship. The first picture with synchronized sound, "The Jazz Singer," featured singing by Al Jolson that was jazz-like in name only.
NEWS
April 30, 1989
Stars came out for Fourth Annual Singers' Salute to the Songwriter benefit concert at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Wednesday night honorees were: Jerome Kern, "An American Legend Award"; Johnny Mandel, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil, Mitchell Parish and Peter Matz, "Arranger's Award." Nearly $500,000 was raised for the Betty Clooney Foundation for Persons With Brain Injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1996 | Don Heckman
Three film-related albums from Verve offer an interesting cross-section of the manner in which jazz-oriented composers were starting to bring the sounds as well as the sensibilities of jazz to the motion picture world in the '60s. Jazz and movies have had a close, if not always intimate, relationship. The first picture with synchronized sound, "The Jazz Singer," featured singing by Al Jolson that was jazz-like in name only.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1996 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Shadow of Your Smile," "A Time for Love," "Emily," "Where Do You Start?" "You Are There"--these superb melodies are just a sampling of the creations of one brilliant artist: Johnny Mandel. Those songs and many others will ring out Sunday at the Jazz Bakery in Culver City during "To Johnny Mandel With Love," a tribute to the Oscar-winning composer that will raise funds for the nonprofit Bakery.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for Calendar
Even if you don't recognize Johnny Mandel's name, it's a fair bet that you've heard some of his music. Mandel, the songwriter/arranger/soundtrack composer, wrote the lasting melodies to such evergreen standards as "The Shadow of Your Smile," which won the Academy Award in 1965 for best song (in "The Sandpiper"), "A Time for Love" and "Suicide Is Painless: The Theme from M*A*S*H." Mandel's profile is low because he's not a performer. He used to play trombone but gave it up 30 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Almost since the dawn of the 20th Century, the lingua franca most vividly illustrative of our social attitudes as a nation, our modus vivendi, has been the popular song. Through its lyrics we can detect beliefs and fads and fashions; its melodies reflect our aesthetic values, for better or worse. Is the American popular song still a durable yardstick, as it has been since the days of player pianos and primitive Victrolas? Or is it in danger of irrelevance and eventual extinction?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
Johnny Mandel's fame has not yet caught up with his talent. After almost 30 years as a composer for motion pictures (including "The Sandpiper," from which the love theme known as "The Shadow of Your Smile" won him both an Academy Award and a Grammy), the former name-band trombonist remains relatively obscure to those for whom Henry Mancini and Quincy Jones are household names.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1992 | ZAN STEWART and New albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to four (excellent).
* * * Jimmy Scott, "All the Way," Sire. The pale tenor of this remarkable yet still widely underappreciated singer here roams wonderful territory: the slow, romantic ballads of the '30s and '40s. Scott is an emotional dynamo, and tunes like Rodgers & Hart's "My Foolish Heart" are designed for his feelings-on-his-sleeve, storytelling approach. Sometimes his voice seems too high, and too thin, but not often.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1987
The Los Angeles Jazz Society recognized six Los Angeles jazz musicians at its fifth-annual Jazz Tribute and Awards Concert Sunday at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. The Tribute Award, the highest commendation, was presented to tuba player and bassist Red Callender.
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