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Johnny Mathis

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1989 | PAUL GREIN
The way the media have toasted cabaret-style balladeers Michael Feinstein and Harry Connick Jr., you'd think that they invented the idea of dusting off old standards and performing them with integrity and reverence. The irony: Johnny Mathis has been singing many of these same chestnuts for 33 years, but has long been taken for granted by the media. Feinstein and Connick have attracted more attention in the past year than Mathis has in more than a decade. Mathis, who headlines the Celebrity Theatre in Anaheim tonight and Saturday, is philosophical about the situation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Christopher Smith
Van Cliburn, the world-famous pianist who died Wednesday, made several appearances in Los Angeles through the years, including one unforgettable night at the Hollywood Bowl. A 1994 appearance at the Bowl tied to the World Cup soccer final and leading into the pianist's 60 th birthday was a confusing shambles in front of 14,000-plus audience members. The July 11 program promised to be an exciting pairing of two taxing pieces, Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto and Rachmaninoff's Third Concerto -- vehicles that had put Cliburn on the map in 1958.
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NEWS
May 27, 2001 | Patt Diroll
What happens when you lose your "legend" performer? Even in L.A., it's not easy to find another on short notice. But, when Tony Bennett canceled after the invitations were in the mail for Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center's 75th anniversary gala May 19, another legend saved the day--Johnny Mathis. Mathis sauntered onto the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel stage and sang his heart out with a voice that seemed as clear as it was 45 years ago when he cut his first album.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010 | By David Mermelstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At a time when the relationship between African Americans and American Jews seems largely irrelevant to the national conversation, the Idelsohn Society for Musical Preservation is directing its gaze back at a different era. Not the early 1990s, when tensions between the two communities exploded into riots in Brooklyn's Crown Heights, but to the days more than 30 years prior, when blacks and Jews reached across the divide to embrace commonalities....
OPINION
December 13, 2006 | ERIN AUBRY KAPLAN
MY MOTHER loves Johnny Mathis. In my family, this is notable because my mother is not the fan type at all. Born in blue-collar New Orleans, she has an almost congenital indifference to famous people. She likes pop music and is fond of many songs, but that never translated into liking musicians or following their careers or, God forbid, going to concerts. (As teenagers, we always got a stock response to our occasional, frantic attempts to score tickets to a concert. "David Bowie?"
SPORTS
March 31, 1986 | DAN HAFNER, Times Staff Writer
With a little help from a strategically placed eucalyptus tree, the Dale Douglass Tour is in full swing. Still finding that life begins at 50, Douglas shot a sizzling six-under-par 66 Sunday at MountainGate Country Club to stave off the challenge of Chi Chi Rodriguez and win the $250,000 Johnny Mathis Seniors tournament by three strokes. In finishing with a 54-hole total of 202, 14-under-par, Douglass kept two amazing strings intact and took over the money earnings lead with $96,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Noga, the feisty music industry player who discovered the young Johnny Mathis and tough-mindedly developed his extraordinary singing career, has died at the age of 88. Noga died Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of heart failure, according to her publicist, Warren Cowan. In the mid-1950s, Noga and her husband, John [who died in 1999], owned two San Francisco jazz clubs, the Black Hawk and the Downbeat.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1987 | PAUL GREIN
Johnny Mathis burst on the pop scene 30 years ago with a series of old-fashioned ballads that made him a star overnight but also typecast him as a courier of courtly romantic valentines. The best of these songs, 'Misty," transcended the genre, but the least interesting--the impossibly sweet "The Twelfth of Never"--created a lingering impression that Mathis sang of a candy-cane world in which everything was, well, wonderful, wonderful.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN
When most record collectors think of Johnny Mathis, they think of Columbia Records. That's the label that released the signature Mathis hits in the '50s, including "Chances Are" and "It's Not for Me to Say"--records that kept the pop ballad tradition alive in the midst of the rock 'n' roll revolution. Between 1957 and 1963, Mathis had 18 Top 40 singles and 23 consecutive Top 40 albums on Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1995 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Johnny Mathis is so square he's hip. When rock 'n' roll was exploding onto American culture in the '50s, Mathis was an unabashed throwback--a Tin Pan Alley balladeer singing achingly romantic love songs in a voice that fairly dripped with passion. And what a voice it was, from the tremulous falsettos to the crystalline enunciation to the purely opulent tenor tone.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Is John Waters a victim of his own popularity? The pencil-mustached favorite son of Baltimore started out as a purveyor of the outrageous; his greatest star, the 300-pound transvestite Divine, once ate dog feces on screen. (No, it wasn't a special effect.) But Waters' gleeful tastelessness has been softened by mainstream acceptance, beginning with his 1988 film "Hairspray," which became a modest breakthrough hit. The story of a hefty girl who integrates an early 1960s TV dance show, it was eventually turned into a Broadway show that won eight Tony Awards, including best musical — and then was remade as a big-budget film.
OPINION
December 13, 2006 | ERIN AUBRY KAPLAN
MY MOTHER loves Johnny Mathis. In my family, this is notable because my mother is not the fan type at all. Born in blue-collar New Orleans, she has an almost congenital indifference to famous people. She likes pop music and is fond of many songs, but that never translated into liking musicians or following their careers or, God forbid, going to concerts. (As teenagers, we always got a stock response to our occasional, frantic attempts to score tickets to a concert. "David Bowie?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ann Dee, a singer and San Francisco club owner who helped boost the careers of Johnny Mathis and other entertainers, has died. She was 85. Dee died March 22 at her home in Joshua Tree, Calif., of unspecified causes. Born Angela Maria De Spirito, Dee had some success in her youth as a cabaret and supper club singer. But for several years, she suffered vocal problems.
NEWS
November 28, 2002 | Elaine Dutka
R&B and soul pioneer Etta James, balladeer Johnny Mathis, orchestra leader Glenn Miller, salsa giant Tito Puente, and folk-rock duo Simon & Garfunkel will receive Lifetime Achievement Awards in February, the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences announced Wednesday. In addition, the New York Philharmonic, the oldest symphony orchestra in the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2002
I cannot recall reading a more mean-spirited article than Paul Brownfield's slice-and-dice job on Danny Gans ("Las Vegas Loves Who?," July 28). Almost everything about Gans seems to have ticked off Brownfield, from Gans' religiously inspired lifestyle to the simpletons who inexplicably enjoy his allegedly marginal talents. The result of all this negativity is that I now really want to see a guy I'd never heard of. LEONARD G. KASSEL Los Angeles Why so grumpy, Mr. Brownfield?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Noga, the feisty music industry player who discovered the young Johnny Mathis and tough-mindedly developed his extraordinary singing career, has died at the age of 88. Noga died Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of heart failure, according to her publicist, Warren Cowan. In the mid-1950s, Noga and her husband, John [who died in 1999], owned two San Francisco jazz clubs, the Black Hawk and the Downbeat.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Is John Waters a victim of his own popularity? The pencil-mustached favorite son of Baltimore started out as a purveyor of the outrageous; his greatest star, the 300-pound transvestite Divine, once ate dog feces on screen. (No, it wasn't a special effect.) But Waters' gleeful tastelessness has been softened by mainstream acceptance, beginning with his 1988 film "Hairspray," which became a modest breakthrough hit. The story of a hefty girl who integrates an early 1960s TV dance show, it was eventually turned into a Broadway show that won eight Tony Awards, including best musical — and then was remade as a big-budget film.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1991 | JOHN D'AGOSTINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The enigma that is Johnny Mathis alternately charmed, thrilled, and perhaps even confused a capacity audience of 1,200 at Humphrey's on Tuesday night. If his two-hour-plus show left one with an overriding impression, it is that time has marched around, and not over Mathis, who closes a three-night engagement at the Shelter Island venue with a single show tonight. Though he turns 56 in September, the remarkably trim, youthful vocalist looks as though he stopped aging at 35.
NEWS
May 27, 2001 | Patt Diroll
What happens when you lose your "legend" performer? Even in L.A., it's not easy to find another on short notice. But, when Tony Bennett canceled after the invitations were in the mail for Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center's 75th anniversary gala May 19, another legend saved the day--Johnny Mathis. Mathis sauntered onto the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel stage and sang his heart out with a voice that seemed as clear as it was 45 years ago when he cut his first album.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN
When most record collectors think of Johnny Mathis, they think of Columbia Records. That's the label that released the signature Mathis hits in the '50s, including "Chances Are" and "It's Not for Me to Say"--records that kept the pop ballad tradition alive in the midst of the rock 'n' roll revolution. Between 1957 and 1963, Mathis had 18 Top 40 singles and 23 consecutive Top 40 albums on Columbia.
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