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Johnny Mike Spann

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OPINION
December 13, 2001
Your Dec. 11 front-page picture showing the haunting face of Shannon Spann cradling her baby while following her husband's coffin hit me in the gut. (He was CIA officer Johnny "Mike" Spann, who was killed in Afghanistan.) It speaks more eloquently of the tragedy of war than a thousand-word essay. Robert Hallock Palm Desert
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OPINION
July 31, 2007
Re "Free our Talib," editorial, July 29 Your editorial advocating the freeing of John Walker Lindh was disgusting. Lindh chose his fate when he refused to identify himself to his American captors, and then when he refused to warn his American interrogators of the impending prisoner attack in the Afghan prison. He is as responsible for the death of CIA operative Johnny "Mike" Spann as the terrorists who shot Spann. Lindh should have been sentenced to death for that.
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OPINION
October 10, 2002
Re "20-Year Sentence for Lindh," Oct. 5: John Walker Lindh was clearly misguided in joining the Taliban prior to 9/11 and taking up its cause. He may have unintentionally violated U.S. law, which might warrant punishment, but the 20-year sentence handed down was unfortunately wrapped in the hysteria and politics of revenge. Bringing in the murder of CIA agent Johnny "Mike" Spann and 9/11, which Lindh had no part in, during sentencing was meant to help justify this to the public. It should be noted that almost all of the original Afghan Taliban soldiers, who were clearly more culpable that Lindh, were released by the new government back to their villages.
WORLD
December 8, 2004 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Captives from Afghanistan have told FBI agents that CIA officer Johnny "Mike" Spann became the first American to die in a clash in Afghanistan after he shot to death a prisoner who was attempting to attack him, possibly sparking the prison riot that claimed his life. The events surrounding Spann's death three years ago have never been fully explained by U.S. officials.
OPINION
July 31, 2007
Re "Free our Talib," editorial, July 29 Your editorial advocating the freeing of John Walker Lindh was disgusting. Lindh chose his fate when he refused to identify himself to his American captors, and then when he refused to warn his American interrogators of the impending prisoner attack in the Afghan prison. He is as responsible for the death of CIA operative Johnny "Mike" Spann as the terrorists who shot Spann. Lindh should have been sentenced to death for that.
OPINION
January 27, 2002 | JACOB HEILBRUNN, Jacob Heilbrunn is a Times editorial writer.
After a decade of relative anonymity, the CIA has suddenly been thrust back into the spotlight. But can it stand the glare? When CIA agent Johnny "Mike" Spann was killed during the Mazar-i-Sharif prison uprising last November, CIA Director George J. Tenet seized upon his death to trumpet the CIA's key role in the war effort. Already the agency has played a prominent role in Afghanistan, where its agents have been helping the military to identify targets. And in the end, nothing can be more central to the war on terrorism than reliable intelligence that can detect and destroy terrorist cells before they strike against the U.S. or its allies.
WORLD
December 8, 2004 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Captives from Afghanistan have told FBI agents that CIA officer Johnny "Mike" Spann became the first American to die in a clash in Afghanistan after he shot to death a prisoner who was attempting to attack him, possibly sparking the prison riot that claimed his life. The events surrounding Spann's death three years ago have never been fully explained by U.S. officials.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | Reuters
The body of slain CIA officer Johnny "Mike" Spann, who was killed during a prison uprising near the northern Afghan city of Mazar-i-Sharif, will arrive in the United States today, the CIA announced. Spann, killed Nov. 25, is the only known American combat death in the U.S. military campaign in Afghanistan. His remains will arrive at Andrews Air Force Base this afternoon, the CIA said. The agency said burial details have not been finalized.
WORLD
January 13, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Sgt. Roy Wood, 47, of Florida became the 100th fatality in the military's Afghan campaign when his vehicle collided with a truck, the military said. Pentagon spokesman James Turner said the death brought the total in Operation Enduring Freedom to 100 -- 30 from hostile fire and 70 "nonhostile" casualties. The total includes 10 soldiers who were supporting Enduring Freedom and died in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
NEWS
January 4, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Five weeks after CIA officer Johnny "Mike" Spann was killed in Afghanistan, his former wife died of cancer, leaving their two young daughters as orphans. Kathryn "Cissy" King, who grew up in the northwest Alabama town of Guin, was buried in suburban Washington, D.C. She was 30. King and Spann, a native of Winfield, divorced several years ago and both remarried. Their daughter Alison was 9 and Emily was 4 when their father was killed Nov. 25 during an uprising of Taliban prisoners in Afghanistan.
OPINION
October 10, 2002
Re "20-Year Sentence for Lindh," Oct. 5: John Walker Lindh was clearly misguided in joining the Taliban prior to 9/11 and taking up its cause. He may have unintentionally violated U.S. law, which might warrant punishment, but the 20-year sentence handed down was unfortunately wrapped in the hysteria and politics of revenge. Bringing in the murder of CIA agent Johnny "Mike" Spann and 9/11, which Lindh had no part in, during sentencing was meant to help justify this to the public. It should be noted that almost all of the original Afghan Taliban soldiers, who were clearly more culpable that Lindh, were released by the new government back to their villages.
OPINION
January 27, 2002 | JACOB HEILBRUNN, Jacob Heilbrunn is a Times editorial writer.
After a decade of relative anonymity, the CIA has suddenly been thrust back into the spotlight. But can it stand the glare? When CIA agent Johnny "Mike" Spann was killed during the Mazar-i-Sharif prison uprising last November, CIA Director George J. Tenet seized upon his death to trumpet the CIA's key role in the war effort. Already the agency has played a prominent role in Afghanistan, where its agents have been helping the military to identify targets. And in the end, nothing can be more central to the war on terrorism than reliable intelligence that can detect and destroy terrorist cells before they strike against the U.S. or its allies.
OPINION
December 13, 2001
Your Dec. 11 front-page picture showing the haunting face of Shannon Spann cradling her baby while following her husband's coffin hit me in the gut. (He was CIA officer Johnny "Mike" Spann, who was killed in Afghanistan.) It speaks more eloquently of the tragedy of war than a thousand-word essay. Robert Hallock Palm Desert
OPINION
December 4, 2001
The CIA is an often maligned agency, but it has its stars, and certainly its youthful operative Johnny "Mike" Spann was one of them--the first American killed in the line of duty in Afghan combat (Nov. 29). Many Americans don't know that the first U.S. fatality in Vietnam was 28-year-old Lt. Col. A. Peter Dewey, a senior U.S. representative in Saigon in 1945. This young OSS officer (Office of Strategic Services, a predecessor to the CIA) was ambushed in his jeep by the Vietminh while on his way to the airport.
WORLD
February 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
CIA officer Helge Boes was killed and two others were injured when a grenade detonated prematurely during a training exercise in eastern Afghanistan, agency officials said. The injuries to the two officers were not believed to be life-threatening. Boes, 32, who lived in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, was an operations officer assigned to the CIA's Counterterrorism Center, the agency said.
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