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Johnny Pacheco

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Johnny Pacheco walks on the tiny stage of the Imperial Ballroom Friday night at the Sportsmen's Lodge, it will be the latest step in a remarkable chapter in the history of salsa. Even if you are unfamiliar with the many currents within the field of Afro-Cuban music, you would surely notice that Pacheco's music is warmer and friendlier to the feet than most of the salsa that is heard today in clubs and on the radio.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One Saturday last month, salsa singer Herman Olivera performed at New York's Madison Square Garden as the lead vocalist with legendary bandleader Eddie Palmieri. Two days later, Olivera was back at his job as a clerk, helping out customers in the telecommunications firm where he works during the day. "Sometimes people come into the office and stay there, just looking at me," he said recently. "Then they'll ask me: 'Do you have a brother who sings?'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One Saturday last month, salsa singer Herman Olivera performed at New York's Madison Square Garden as the lead vocalist with legendary bandleader Eddie Palmieri. Two days later, Olivera was back at his job as a clerk, helping out customers in the telecommunications firm where he works during the day. "Sometimes people come into the office and stay there, just looking at me," he said recently. "Then they'll ask me: 'Do you have a brother who sings?'
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Johnny Pacheco walks on the tiny stage of the Imperial Ballroom Friday night at the Sportsmen's Lodge, it will be the latest step in a remarkable chapter in the history of salsa. Even if you are unfamiliar with the many currents within the field of Afro-Cuban music, you would surely notice that Pacheco's music is warmer and friendlier to the feet than most of the salsa that is heard today in clubs and on the radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1999
Jazz Usually heard as a sideman or setting the beat for the Modern Jazz Quartet, drummer Tootie Heath leads his own quartet tonight. * Chadney's Universal, 3575 Cahuenga Blvd. West, Universal City, (323) 851-1333. * Music You're in for an evening of serious salsa when veteran New York percussionist Johnny Pacheco and singer Hector Casanova share the bill with local luminaries Johnny Polanco y Su Conjunto Amistad. * Sportsmen's Lodge, 12833 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, (818) 755-5000.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER
The idea that Tito Puente's music is not what it used to be has circulated within salsa circles for a decade--a glorifying of the percussionist's golden days, while minimizing his latest musical contributions. That view was shattered Thursday at the Conga Room, where Puente demonstrated that he remains, at 75, one of the most vital and energetic performers in the field. Yes, maybe the timbale solos aren't as technically ambitious as in the percussionist's experimental days of the '50s and '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A couple of weeks ago, New York bandleader Wayne Gorbea delighted Southland tropical music aficionados at the Sportsmen's Lodge, demonstrating that the '70s style known as hard salsa is still alive and kicking--if not commercially, at least in artistic terms. On Saturday at the Conga Room, Brooklyn-based timbalero Willie Villegas and his seven-piece ensemble Entre Amigos reinforced Gorbea's statement with two crackling sets of unadulterated hard salsa. The two bandleaders have a lot in common.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The music we know today as salsa, the combination of Afro-Cuban beats with the swing of big band jazz, reached its creative apex in New York during the 1970s. It was then that artists such as Johnny Pacheco, Eddie Palmieri and Ruben Blades released some of the genre's best records. This was dangerously infectious music, as ambitious as it was danceable.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1992 | ENRIQUE BLANC ENRIQUE BLANC..BD: SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not many artists get to record 100 albums, so when Latin bandleader and composer Tito Puente--one of the most prominent and prolific musicians in United States since the early '50s--reached that milestone, a little celebration seemed in order. On Saturday at the Universal Amphitheatre, some of the most distinguished figures in the world of Latin tropical music joined Puente and his orchestra to re-create their collaborations on the recently released "The 100th."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1999
The UCLA Hammer Museum of Art presents its third annual "L.A. Impacts" Festival, a daylong program that will highlight many of the cultural and artistic programs that serve families and children in Los Angeles. Events include musical performances by students from the L.A. County High School for the Arts, the Susie Hansen Latin Band, and interactive storytelling with Maria Elena Gaitan. * "L.A. Impacts" Festival, UCLA Hammer Museum of Art, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2003 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Celia Cruz sent me a Christmas card in 1985. It was one of those that had a photograph on the front, the singer pictured in a festive red dress along with her dapper husband, musician Pedro Knight, his arm around her shoulder. Celia, as everybody knew her, also took the time to send me a couple of postcards while on the road, from Helsinki and Holland. She addressed them to "Amigo Agustin," always on behalf of her and her beloved Pedro.
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