Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohnny Paycheck
IN THE NEWS

Johnny Paycheck

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2003 | From Associated Press
Johnny PayCheck, the hard-living country singer best known for his 1977 workingman's anthem "Take This Job and Shove It," has died. He was 64. PayCheck, who had been bedridden with emphysema and asthma, died Tuesday at a nursing home in Nashville, a Grand Ole Opry spokeswoman said. Specializing in earthy, plain-spoken songs, PayCheck recorded 70 albums and had more than two dozen hit singles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2003 | From Associated Press
Johnny PayCheck, the hard-living country singer best known for his 1977 workingman's anthem "Take This Job and Shove It," has died. He was 64. PayCheck, who had been bedridden with emphysema and asthma, died Tuesday at a nursing home in Nashville, a Grand Ole Opry spokeswoman said. Specializing in earthy, plain-spoken songs, PayCheck recorded 70 albums and had more than two dozen hit singles.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1992 | JIM MACNIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
People will try the damnedest things for the sake of a good time, but it was still somewhat surprising to see a few Billy Ray Cyrus zealots attempting to achy-breaky dance their way through a Johnny Paycheck concert last summer. The venue was a New England county fair--complete with chowder, corn dogs and family values--and the high-steppers were having a hard time negotiating a grassy incline newly slippery with evening dew: Their standardized moves just didn't jibe with the music.
NEWS
August 5, 1994 | JAMES E. FOWLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Country singer Johnny Paycheck's name almost became a household word in the 1970s when his working-class anthem, "Take This Job and Shove It," rose to No. 1 on the country-Western charts. The song, which touched a chord with America's wage earners, even inspired a movie. Then came the '80s, which were not as kind to Paycheck. He battled the law, the IRS and his own excesses. But now he's on the comeback trail, and this month that trail winds through Chatsworth. He will perform two shows Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1990
The U.S. attorney's office filed a civil complaint today to collect more than $1.6 million in unpaid federal tax assessments against imprisoned country music singer Johnny Paycheck. The government's complaint alleges unpaid tax assessments, including accrued penalties and interest, for the years 1980, 1981 and 1982. Paycheck, 52, whose real name is Donald Lytle, was convicted last year of aggravated assault and tampering with evidence in connection with a barroom shooting.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Take this Jail Term and . . .: Johnny Paycheck, who achieved stardom in 1978 with the worker's anthem "Take This Job and Shove It," is singing the blues to Ohio Gov. Richard Celeste in hopes of getting out of prison. Paycheck, whose real name is Donald Eugene Lytle, is serving a 7- to 9 1/2-year prison term for a shooting in a bar in 1985. The singer is asking Celeste to grant him clemency before the governor leaves office Jan. 15. Paycheck won't be eligible for parole for five years.
NEWS
December 3, 1986
Ailing country singer Johnny Paycheck left a hospital in Redding, where he had been reported in critical condition with bronchitis, emphysema and intestinal bleeding, despite protests from doctors and friends. "He's not been released from the hospital, he just walked out," Charlie Ammerman, Paycheck's manager, said in Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
May 17, 1986 | Associated Press
Country and Western singer Johnny Paycheck was found guilty Friday of shooting a man in a bar after an argument, and he was sentenced to up to 9 1/2 years in prison. Paycheck, who showed no emotion when the verdict was read in Higland County Common Pleas Court, was convicted of a reduced charge of aggravated assault and tampering with evidence for disposing of the gun in the shooting of Larry Wise of Greenfield. Paycheck was acquitted of carrying a concealed weapon.
NEWS
August 5, 1994 | JAMES E. FOWLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Country singer Johnny Paycheck's name almost became a household word in the 1970s when his working-class anthem, "Take This Job and Shove It," rose to No. 1 on the country-Western charts. The song, which touched a chord with America's wage earners, even inspired a movie. Then came the '80s, which were not as kind to Paycheck. He battled the law, the IRS and his own excesses. But now he's on the comeback trail, and this month that trail winds through Chatsworth. He will perform two shows Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1992 | NOEL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the folks doing the electric slide up at the Denim and Diamonds nightclub in Huntington Beach, the epitome of country music may be a squeaky-clean cowboy with a degree in marketing singing a Billy Joel song through his nose. Down at the Coach House on Tuesday night, however, veteran country singer Johnny Paycheck gave an enthusiastic crowd a look at the other side of country music: the tear-your-heart-out, puke-in-your-beer, blue-collar grit of country's soulful roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1992 | NOEL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the folks doing the electric slide up at the Denim and Diamonds nightclub in Huntington Beach, the epitome of country music may be a squeaky-clean cowboy with a degree in marketing singing a Billy Joel song through his nose. Down at the Coach House on Tuesday night, however, veteran country singer Johnny Paycheck gave an enthusiastic crowd a look at the other side of country music: the tear-your-heart-out, puke-in-your-beer, blue-collar grit of country's soulful roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1992 | JIM MACNIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
People will try the damnedest things for the sake of a good time, but it was still somewhat surprising to see a few Billy Ray Cyrus zealots attempting to achy-breaky dance their way through a Johnny Paycheck concert last summer. The venue was a New England county fair--complete with chowder, corn dogs and family values--and the high-steppers were having a hard time negotiating a grassy incline newly slippery with evening dew: Their standardized moves just didn't jibe with the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Take this Jail Term and . . .: Johnny Paycheck, who achieved stardom in 1978 with the worker's anthem "Take This Job and Shove It," is singing the blues to Ohio Gov. Richard Celeste in hopes of getting out of prison. Paycheck, whose real name is Donald Eugene Lytle, is serving a 7- to 9 1/2-year prison term for a shooting in a bar in 1985. The singer is asking Celeste to grant him clemency before the governor leaves office Jan. 15. Paycheck won't be eligible for parole for five years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1990
The U.S. attorney's office filed a civil complaint today to collect more than $1.6 million in unpaid federal tax assessments against imprisoned country music singer Johnny Paycheck. The government's complaint alleges unpaid tax assessments, including accrued penalties and interest, for the years 1980, 1981 and 1982. Paycheck, 52, whose real name is Donald Lytle, was convicted last year of aggravated assault and tampering with evidence in connection with a barroom shooting.
NEWS
December 3, 1986
Ailing country singer Johnny Paycheck left a hospital in Redding, where he had been reported in critical condition with bronchitis, emphysema and intestinal bleeding, despite protests from doctors and friends. "He's not been released from the hospital, he just walked out," Charlie Ammerman, Paycheck's manager, said in Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
May 17, 1986 | Associated Press
Country and Western singer Johnny Paycheck was found guilty Friday of shooting a man in a bar after an argument, and he was sentenced to up to 9 1/2 years in prison. Paycheck, who showed no emotion when the verdict was read in Higland County Common Pleas Court, was convicted of a reduced charge of aggravated assault and tampering with evidence for disposing of the gun in the shooting of Larry Wise of Greenfield. Paycheck was acquitted of carrying a concealed weapon.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Faron Young, country singer and film actor whose string of hits included the classic Willie Nelson song "Hello Walls," died Tuesday of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. He was 64. Young was taken to Columbia Summit Medical Center on Monday after a friend found him wounded at his home. A suicide note was discovered near him detailing Young's plans to kill himself, police said.
NEWS
December 20, 1985 | Associated Press
Country singer Johnny Paycheck, best known for the 1977 hit "Take This Job and Shove It," was charged today with shooting a man in a tavern dispute and was jailed in lieu of $25,000 bond. A police spokesman said Paycheck shot Larry Wise of Greenfield with a small-caliber pistol about 11:30 p.m. Thursday in this Highland County community.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|