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Johnny Ray

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SPORTS
February 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Johnny Ray, who led the Pittsburgh Pirates with a .301 batting average, has been named the 1986 winner of the Roberto Clemente Award presented by Pittsburgh's Baseball Writers of America chapter. The award is given annually to the Pirates' player who best exemplifies the baseball standards of excellence achieved by Clemente, a Hall of Fame outfielder. Ray finished seventh in the National League in batting (.301), was tied for seventh in hits (174) and was tied for ninth in doubles (33).
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BUSINESS
December 2, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Ray Gasca, whose thriving bootleg film business earned him the nickname "Prince of Piracy," was sentenced Friday to seven years in federal prison for illegally taping movies in theaters and other crimes. The sentence from U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson in Los Angeles marks one of the most significant victories for the government and Hollywood studios in the stepped-up battle against movie bootlegs.
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SPORTS
April 26, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
Injuries are part of the game, Johnny Ray said. It is just that they had not been part of his game. His only stint on the disabled list in a career of more than seven years began April 6, only two games into the start of this new season. After 15 days on the DL, Ray has been back in the starting lineup the past two games, and he offers this one-word review of the DL: "Boring." Nothing much to do but stare at a sprained left wrist and urge it to get better. Nothing better to do during games than watch for tendencies of opposing pitchers he would not face that day. Ray was 0 for 9 in the first two games of the season.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Johnny Ray Gasca, a Los Angeles resident whom the FBI has called the poster boy of movie piracy, said taping movies in theaters wasn't illegal at the time he was arrested. Gasca, 35, is accused of taping movies, including Sony Pictures' "Anger Management," at screenings before they were released and selling copies he made over the Internet. Piracy costs the movie industry about $3.5 billion a year in lost business, according to the Motion Picture Assn. of America.
SPORTS
May 26, 1990 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All Johnny Ray really wanted Friday afternoon was to grab a snack and some peace and quiet before the Angels' game with the Milwaukee Brewers. But Ray was in demand. A television station wanted the Angel second baseman to appear during its newscast. Live. A newspaper reporter had been badgering him for a few moments of his time. It's that way when you've had a dramatic two-week turnaround the way Ray has.
SPORTS
August 14, 1989
Johnny Ray, who batted .440 (11 for 25) in six games last week, is The Times' Orange County Edition Angel of the Week. Ray also drove in four runs. The Times will donate $200 in Ray's name to the Boys and Girls Clubs of Orange County.
SPORTS
May 11, 1988 | Mike Downey
Johnny Ray has been an angel from heaven. Or, Johnny Angel has been a ray from heaven. As you like it. Either way, one of the best things to happen to the city of Anaheim since Disneyland built the Pirates of the Caribbean ride has been the arrival of John Cornelius Ray, the infielder turned outfielder who used to be one of the Pirates of the Monongahela. For a guy learning a new position on the job, in his eighth year in the majors, Johnny Ray has done all right. No, more than all right.
SPORTS
December 9, 1987 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
The Angels' plan to move Johnny Ray to left field, allowing Mark McLemore to return to second base, faces a significant hurdle. "I think Johnny Ray can play left field and Johnny Ray believes he can, but we're not going to risk his future employment on this little experiment," Ray's agent, Tom Selakovich, said in an interview at baseball's winter meetings Tuesday. Selakovich said that Ray is against making the move without a contract extension.
SPORTS
September 23, 1989
It's interesting to read Kirk McCaskill's comments (Sept. 17) about Angel hitters' lack of "mental discipline" at the plate. This is a problem that became apparent early in the season and has resulted in many, many missed scoring opportunities all year. As a former high school baseball coach, we used to teach that offense was scoring runs , not just hitting. The approach was: look for a particular pitch in a particular location; hit according to the count; have an idea of what pitch you handle best; use the whole field; and, most important, move runners.
SPORTS
March 25, 1990 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Johnny Ray suffered a sore neck and a few moments of lightheadedness Saturday after being hit on the helmet twice during a simulated game. The Angels' second baseman was hitting right-handed when a Scott Bailes curveball sent him diving to the dirt, and was hitting left-handed when a fastball got away from Bryan Harvey. Ray's neck snapped back on the second occasion and he needed several minutes to regain his composure, but walked off the field unaided.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz and Li Fellers, Times Staff Writers
Like countless other dreamers, Johnny Ray Gasca came to Hollywood with a screenplay to pitch and a list of moguls to schmooze. Unlike most of the others, he quickly grabbed the movie industry's attention -- but maybe not quite the way he had in mind. Gasca, a Bronx native and convicted felon, is believed to be the first person charged in federal court with violating copyright laws by videotaping movies at pre-release screenings.
SPORTS
December 21, 1990 | ROSS NEWHAN
Veteran infielder Johnny Ray, who had asked to be traded or released by the Angels at the end of last season, was given his release Thursday and signed a two-year contract with the Yakult Swallows of the Japanese League. Ray, 33, was under contract to the Angels for 1991 at $1.4 million, but the club will no longer be obligated, a spokesman said. The terms of his contract with the Swallows were not announced. Ray, who batted .
SPORTS
July 19, 1990 | ADAM STEINHAUER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Angels were trailing by three runs when Johnny Ray came to bat in the fourth inning of Wednesday's game against the Milwaukee Brewers and launched a Mark Knudson fastball into the right-field bullpen. He ended up with a home run and a single in four at-bats during the Angels' 3-2 loss to Milwaukee. Ray has shaken off far greater discouragements than a 3-0 deficit this season and far greater distractions than the ever-changing lineup of streaking and slumping players.
SPORTS
July 16, 1990 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His heart was heavy when he returned from Oklahoma after his father-in-law's funeral Saturday, and Johnny Ray welcomed the chance to immerse himself in the routine of playing second base Sunday when Wally Joyner's sore knee unexpectedly thrust Ray into the Angels' lineup. Ray's ninth-inning single off Tom Henke allowed him to lose himself, if only for a few moments, in the happy emotion of winning.
SPORTS
May 26, 1990 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All Johnny Ray really wanted Friday afternoon was to grab a snack and some peace and quiet before the Angels' game with the Milwaukee Brewers. But Ray was in demand. A television station wanted the Angel second baseman to appear during its newscast. Live. A newspaper reporter had been badgering him for a few moments of his time. It's that way when you've had a dramatic two-week turnaround the way Ray has.
SPORTS
April 10, 1990 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was their Ray of hope, and of sunshine. On a dim opening night, Johnny Ray was a point of light for the Angels--one of far too few. The Angels managed only five hits in a 7-4 loss to Seattle at Anaheim Stadium. Ray had two. They scored four runs. Ray scored three, and the one he didn't score, he drove in with a sacrifice fly. The Angels' season at the plate began with a strikeout by Devon White. Up stepped Ray, who drove the second pitch over the right-center field wall for a homer.
SPORTS
December 21, 1990 | ROSS NEWHAN
Veteran infielder Johnny Ray, who had asked to be traded or released by the Angels at the end of last season, was given his release Thursday and signed a two-year contract with the Yakult Swallows of the Japanese League. Ray, 33, was under contract to the Angels for 1991 at $1.4 million, but the club will no longer be obligated, a spokesman said. The terms of his contract with the Swallows were not announced. Ray, who batted .
SPORTS
March 25, 1990 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Johnny Ray suffered a sore neck and a few moments of lightheadedness Saturday after being hit on the helmet twice during a simulated game. The Angels' second baseman was hitting right-handed when a Scott Bailes curveball sent him diving to the dirt, and was hitting left-handed when a fastball got away from Bryan Harvey. Ray's neck snapped back on the second occasion and he needed several minutes to regain his composure, but walked off the field unaided.
SPORTS
March 21, 1990 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deciding how to best deploy his talented pitching staff may be Doug Rader's biggest decision, but it wasn't the first one made by the Angels' manager. Before the sun had set on the first day of camp Tuesday, Rader said that the second base job belongs to Johnny Ray "at the moment," and added that he might use Mark McLemore elsewhere. Ray and McLemore have competed at second for the past two springs: McLemore opened the season at second in '88, but Ray won out in 1989, despite McLemore's .
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