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Johnny Ray Gasca

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BUSINESS
April 16, 2005 | Lorenza Munoz
Accused film pirate Johnny Ray Gasca was indicted on federal charges for allegedly fleeing from the custody of his lawyer in January 2004. Gasca, who authorities allege sold films he taped with a camcorder at movie previews, was arrested this month after being on the lam for more than a year. Gasca allegedly fled as he was about to face felony charges of copyright infringement, witness retaliation, interstate communication of a threat and possession of false identification.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 6, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Two cousins from Los Angeles have been arrested on allegations that they stole and made bootleg copies of Oscar "screeners" including "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," "Superman Returns" and "The Queen." John Acas, 22, was arrested in his home Monday by Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies after uploading copies to the Internet and attempting to sell the movies to an informant, authorities said. Sheryl Demesa, Acas' 22-year-old cousin, was arrested the same day at an L.A.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Two cousins from Los Angeles have been arrested on allegations that they stole and made bootleg copies of Oscar "screeners" including "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," "Superman Returns" and "The Queen." John Acas, 22, was arrested in his home Monday by Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies after uploading copies to the Internet and attempting to sell the movies to an informant, authorities said. Sheryl Demesa, Acas' 22-year-old cousin, was arrested the same day at an L.A.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Ray Gasca, whose thriving bootleg film business earned him the nickname "Prince of Piracy," was sentenced Friday to seven years in federal prison for illegally taping movies in theaters and other crimes. The sentence from U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson in Los Angeles marks one of the most significant victories for the government and Hollywood studios in the stepped-up battle against movie bootlegs.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2005 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Ray Gasca was just days away from standing trial when he gave his lawyer the slip at a Longs Drugstore in West Los Angeles. He said he needed to buy some cold medicine. For more than a year, Hollywood's alleged prince of piracy eluded capture in much the same way he had bedeviled studios with his ability to secretly videotape movies during advance screenings, sometimes weeks before the films hit theaters. On Tuesday, the curtain dropped on Gasca's long-running stint on the lam.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Johnny Ray Gasca, a Los Angeles resident whom the FBI has called the poster boy of movie piracy, said taping movies in theaters wasn't illegal at the time he was arrested. Gasca, 35, is accused of taping movies, including Sony Pictures' "Anger Management," at screenings before they were released and selling copies he made over the Internet. Piracy costs the movie industry about $3.5 billion a year in lost business, according to the Motion Picture Assn. of America.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Ray Gasca, whose thriving bootleg film business earned him the nickname "Prince of Piracy," was sentenced Friday to seven years in federal prison for illegally taping movies in theaters and other crimes. The sentence from U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson in Los Angeles marks one of the most significant victories for the government and Hollywood studios in the stepped-up battle against movie bootlegs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz and Li Fellers, Times Staff Writers
Like countless other dreamers, Johnny Ray Gasca came to Hollywood with a screenplay to pitch and a list of moguls to schmooze. Unlike most of the others, he quickly grabbed the movie industry's attention -- but maybe not quite the way he had in mind. Gasca, a Bronx native and convicted felon, is believed to be the first person charged in federal court with violating copyright laws by videotaping movies at pre-release screenings.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
A Los Angeles man was indicted on criminal copyright infringement charges in what prosecutors said may be the first U.S. case against someone who taped a movie at a screening. Johnny Ray Gasca, 33, was charged with criminal infringement of a copyright and witness retaliation. The U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles said Gasca used a camcorder to tape movies such as "Anger Management."
BUSINESS
April 23, 2003 | Hanah Cho
A Hollywood man has been charged with videotaping several movies at pre-release film screenings in what may be the first federal prosecution for "camcording," federal prosecutors said. Johnny Ray Gasca, 33, was arrested Tuesday and charged with conspiracy to commit copyright infringement, witness intimidation and using a false name, said Assistant U.S. Atty. Chris Johnson.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Johnny Ray Gasca, a Los Angeles resident whom the FBI has called the poster boy of movie piracy, said taping movies in theaters wasn't illegal at the time he was arrested. Gasca, 35, is accused of taping movies, including Sony Pictures' "Anger Management," at screenings before they were released and selling copies he made over the Internet. Piracy costs the movie industry about $3.5 billion a year in lost business, according to the Motion Picture Assn. of America.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2005 | Lorenza Munoz
Accused film pirate Johnny Ray Gasca was indicted on federal charges for allegedly fleeing from the custody of his lawyer in January 2004. Gasca, who authorities allege sold films he taped with a camcorder at movie previews, was arrested this month after being on the lam for more than a year. Gasca allegedly fled as he was about to face felony charges of copyright infringement, witness retaliation, interstate communication of a threat and possession of false identification.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2005 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Ray Gasca was just days away from standing trial when he gave his lawyer the slip at a Longs Drugstore in West Los Angeles. He said he needed to buy some cold medicine. For more than a year, Hollywood's alleged prince of piracy eluded capture in much the same way he had bedeviled studios with his ability to secretly videotape movies during advance screenings, sometimes weeks before the films hit theaters. On Tuesday, the curtain dropped on Gasca's long-running stint on the lam.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz and Li Fellers, Times Staff Writers
Like countless other dreamers, Johnny Ray Gasca came to Hollywood with a screenplay to pitch and a list of moguls to schmooze. Unlike most of the others, he quickly grabbed the movie industry's attention -- but maybe not quite the way he had in mind. Gasca, a Bronx native and convicted felon, is believed to be the first person charged in federal court with violating copyright laws by videotaping movies at pre-release screenings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Ray Gasca, the first person facing federal prosecution for allegedly "camcording" unreleased movies, has fled custody less than a week before his trial was to begin, officials said. On Friday, U.S. District Judge Dean Pregerson issued a warrant for the arrest of Gasca, who is charged with conspiracy to commit copyright infringement, witness intimidation, economic extortion and using a false name, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles.
OPINION
April 8, 2005
Don't bet on Hollywood making a biopic anytime soon about Johnny Ray Gasca, the "prince of piracy" who was arrested Tuesday in a Kissimmee, Fla., hotel room chock full of recording devices and DVDs. No doubt a film (starring reel-world pirate Johnny Depp?) would quickly spread the word that authorities are serious about cracking down on movie piracy.
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