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Johnny Rivers

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April 25, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
What's Johnny Rivers -- the Brooklyn-born, Baton Rouge, La.-reared rocker who put 32 singles on the Billboard Hot 100 from 1964 to 1977 -- doing headlining the Ventura Country Blues Festival on Saturday? “I grew up in south Louisiana,” Rivers, 70, said earlier this week. “If you think about it, all of my hits, except maybe 'Memphis,' were rooted in the blues. When I was at the Whisky [in the mid-1960s], I was playing Fats Domino and Jimmy Reed songs. I was doing John Lee Hooker songs in 1964, long before George Thorogood came along.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2013 | By Lee Margulies
"A country music fan is the most loyal creature on Earth if you're honest with them," singer George Jones once said, and in death he's paying some of that loyalty back. His funeral service at the Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville on Thursday will be open to the public. "George would have wanted his fans and friends to be able to come and pay their respects along with his family," publicist Kirt Webster said in announcing the decision Sunday. Jones had been a member of the Grand Ole Opry since 1956.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
What's Johnny Rivers - the Brooklyn-born, Baton Rouge, La.-reared rocker who put 32 singles on the Billboard Hot 100 from 1964 to 1977 - doing headlining the Ventura County Blues Festival on Saturday? "I grew up in south Louisiana," Rivers, 70, said this week. "If you think about it, all of my hits, except maybe 'Memphis,' were rooted in the blues. When I was at the Whisky [in the mid-1960s], I was playing Fats Domino and Jimmy Reed songs. I was doing John Lee Hooker songs in 1964, long before George Thorogood came along.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013
Who : Johnny Rivers, Savoy Brown, Kenny Neal, Dona Oxford, Preston Smith & the Crocodiles, Michael John & the Bottom Line When : 11 a.m., Saturday Where : Moorpark College, 7075 Campus Road, Moorpark Cost : $25 in advance, $30 at the gate, children 12 and under free with adult; benefits American Diabetes Assn. and local charities Info : (805) 501-7122 or http://www.venturacountyblues.com
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the 1960s, Johnny Rivers was one of the first pop stars to run his own record company and produce hits for others. Now, the Louisiana-reared rocker is mounting a comeback with his first new album in years, yet he's happy to keep it on a low-keyed, do-it-yourself scale. These days, pop savants who achieve major success wearing multiple hats as artists, producers and record moguls are as numerous as playoff-bound baseball teams.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013
Who : Johnny Rivers, Savoy Brown, Kenny Neal, Dona Oxford, Preston Smith & the Crocodiles, Michael John & the Bottom Line When : 11 a.m., Saturday Where : Moorpark College, 7075 Campus Road, Moorpark Cost : $25 in advance, $30 at the gate, children 12 and under free with adult; benefits American Diabetes Assn. and local charities Info : (805) 501-7122 or http://www.venturacountyblues.com
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2013 | By Lee Margulies
"A country music fan is the most loyal creature on Earth if you're honest with them," singer George Jones once said, and in death he's paying some of that loyalty back. His funeral service at the Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville on Thursday will be open to the public. "George would have wanted his fans and friends to be able to come and pay their respects along with his family," publicist Kirt Webster said in announcing the decision Sunday. Jones had been a member of the Grand Ole Opry since 1956.
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
One day in 1960, when Johnny Ramistella was living in Baton Rouge, La., with his parents, his mother answered the telephone. "Johnny," she said. "It's some guy who says he's calling from Hollywood." The caller was James Burton, a musician from Shreveport who was working with pop idol Ricky Nelson's band on the coast. Burton had made the 18-year-old Ramistella's acquaintance while on vacation, catching him singing and playing guitar on the popular "Louisiana Hayride" radio program.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1988
The front page of The Times (March 19) included a headline which stated "500 Seized in Several U.S. Protests on Troop Moves." The article stated the protests were reminiscent of the Vietnam War era. There was another headline of the very same page which stated "Cambodian Refugees--Life in Limbo." The article told of the outrageously pitiful lives which these Cambodians are presently forced to endure. By coincidence the timing of these two articles was excellent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1991 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Gazzarri, Sunset Boulevard's self-styled cigar-chomping, white-hatted "godfather of rock and roll" for three decades, has died. He was 66. Gazzarri, who futilely advocated poker for rock clubs and a sidewalk of fame for rock stars, died Wednesday at his West Hollywood home of natural causes, his attorney, Laurence Ring, said Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
What's Johnny Rivers - the Brooklyn-born, Baton Rouge, La.-reared rocker who put 32 singles on the Billboard Hot 100 from 1964 to 1977 - doing headlining the Ventura County Blues Festival on Saturday? "I grew up in south Louisiana," Rivers, 70, said this week. "If you think about it, all of my hits, except maybe 'Memphis,' were rooted in the blues. When I was at the Whisky [in the mid-1960s], I was playing Fats Domino and Jimmy Reed songs. I was doing John Lee Hooker songs in 1964, long before George Thorogood came along.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
What's Johnny Rivers -- the Brooklyn-born, Baton Rouge, La.-reared rocker who put 32 singles on the Billboard Hot 100 from 1964 to 1977 -- doing headlining the Ventura Country Blues Festival on Saturday? “I grew up in south Louisiana,” Rivers, 70, said earlier this week. “If you think about it, all of my hits, except maybe 'Memphis,' were rooted in the blues. When I was at the Whisky [in the mid-1960s], I was playing Fats Domino and Jimmy Reed songs. I was doing John Lee Hooker songs in 1964, long before George Thorogood came along.
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
One day in 1960, when Johnny Ramistella was living in Baton Rouge, La., with his parents, his mother answered the telephone. "Johnny," she said. "It's some guy who says he's calling from Hollywood." The caller was James Burton, a musician from Shreveport who was working with pop idol Ricky Nelson's band on the coast. Burton had made the 18-year-old Ramistella's acquaintance while on vacation, catching him singing and playing guitar on the popular "Louisiana Hayride" radio program.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the 1960s, Johnny Rivers was one of the first pop stars to run his own record company and produce hits for others. Now, the Louisiana-reared rocker is mounting a comeback with his first new album in years, yet he's happy to keep it on a low-keyed, do-it-yourself scale. These days, pop savants who achieve major success wearing multiple hats as artists, producers and record moguls are as numerous as playoff-bound baseball teams.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1988
The front page of The Times (March 19) included a headline which stated "500 Seized in Several U.S. Protests on Troop Moves." The article stated the protests were reminiscent of the Vietnam War era. There was another headline of the very same page which stated "Cambodian Refugees--Life in Limbo." The article told of the outrageously pitiful lives which these Cambodians are presently forced to endure. By coincidence the timing of these two articles was excellent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2001
8pm Jazz Ken Burns' "Jazz" series devoted generous attention to the raw, straight-from-the-heart brand of jazz that Louis Armstrong, King Oliver and others developed in New Orleans in the early part of the 20th century. The style is still embraced at Preservation Hall in the Crescent City. The Preservation Hall Jazz Band returns for another of its foot-stamping performances in Irvine.* Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus Drive. 8 p.m. $26 to $32. (949) 854-4646.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1995 | JAMES E. FOWLER
Country-rock singer Juice Newton, who spends about five months out of the year on the road, likes gigs like this weekend's Palmdale Fall Festival. "These fall events are great fun," Newton says. "They usually have a looser feel and a more fun-loving crowd."
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