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NEWS
April 28, 1991
Johnny Thunders, 38, a founding member of the "glitter rock" band New York Dolls. After changing his name from John Anthony Genzale, Thunders helped create the 1970s version of rock 'n' roll featuring outrageous costumes and women's makeup. The group's look was quickly copied by other rock headliners ranging from Elton John to the rock band Kiss. Thunders left the New York Dolls in 1974, but continued recording with other groups and as a soloist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would take some digging to unearth a sorrier, grimier, more pathetic rock 'n' roll story than that of Johnny Thunders, a punk rock primogenitor who spent most of his career so addled by heroin addiction that even his fans pegged him as a walking dead man. He lived up to expectations with a fatal injection at age 38.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Johnny Thunders' leading claims to a place in rock history is a song called "You Can't Put Your Arms Round a Memory," the affecting lament of a man who knows that the deck in life and love is stacked against him. Erasing memories can be even harder than holding onto them.
NEWS
April 28, 1991
Johnny Thunders, 38, a founding member of the "glitter rock" band New York Dolls. After changing his name from John Anthony Genzale, Thunders helped create the 1970s version of rock 'n' roll featuring outrageous costumes and women's makeup. The group's look was quickly copied by other rock headliners ranging from Elton John to the rock band Kiss. Thunders left the New York Dolls in 1974, but continued recording with other groups and as a soloist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would take some digging to unearth a sorrier, grimier, more pathetic rock 'n' roll story than that of Johnny Thunders, a punk rock primogenitor who spent most of his career so addled by heroin addiction that even his fans pegged him as a walking dead man. He lived up to expectations with a fatal injection at age 38.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001
Neil Cooper, 71, president and founder of the ROIR rock and reggae record label, died Aug. 13 of cancer in New York. Cooper, a former agent for MCA and Famous Artists, started the New York-based independent Reach Out International Records in 1979 to release material solely on cassette tapes. His first release, in 1981, was by James Chance and the Contortions. Cooper produced cassettes by such rock acts as Bad Brains, Glenn Branca, Television, the MC5, Johnny Thunders and the New York Dolls.
NEWS
March 20, 2003 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
The revolution will not be compromised. Not by D4, a quartet of New Zealand punk-rock scholars devoted to music that is sweaty, loud and pure. The new garage-rock movement was built for them, a place to pile up jagged riffs and frantic vocals against a desperate rock beat. At the Troubadour on Tuesday, the band performed barely 50 minutes of quick punk tunes, drawing on the rich, shambling history of Johnny Thunders and other infamous underground loser-heroes.
NEWS
October 7, 2004 | Heidi Siegmund Cuda
An East Coast sense of glam Hollywood morphed into the Lower East Side last Thursday, when the New York Dolls blew into town and glammed up the Avalon nightclub. Among the music fans who turned out to hear such classics as "Personality Crisis," "Jet Boy" and "Trash" were Rodney Bingenheimer, rocker Glenn Danzig, and members of the Skulls, the Horribles and Ze Auto Parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Johnny Thunders' leading claims to a place in rock history is a song called "You Can't Put Your Arms Round a Memory," the affecting lament of a man who knows that the deck in life and love is stacked against him. Erasing memories can be even harder than holding onto them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2000
SANTA ANA 8pm Pop Music Robert Gordon may not have been the first rockabilly revivalist when he hiccuped onto the scene in the late '70s with "Red Hot," "Black Slacks" and other '50s-soaked hits, but he was the most successful in getting his recordings up the charts. Last month, he put out a live album covering his best-known covers of proto-rock songs, including the aforementioned two, plus "Twenty Flight Rock" and "Flying Saucers Rock 'n' Roll." * Robert Gordon, Galaxy Concert Theatre, 3503 S.
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