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Johnny Winter

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May 8, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's no mistaking the deep-seated love for the blues shared by Taj Mahal and Johnny Winter. But though Winter's devotion has wavered little over 30 years, blue defines only one color of Mahal's musical rainbow. The lanky, tattoo-laden Winter has stretched his fondness for Texas-style blues-rock into a long if uneven career. He first made headlines in 1968 when Rolling Stone called him "a 130-pound cross-eyed albino with long fleecy hair . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's no mistaking the deep-seated love for the blues shared by Taj Mahal and Johnny Winter. But though Winter's devotion has wavered little over 30 years, blue defines only one color of Mahal's musical rainbow. The lanky, tattoo-laden Winter has stretched his fondness for Texas-style blues-rock into a long if uneven career. He first made headlines in 1968 when Rolling Stone called him "a 130-pound cross-eyed albino with long fleecy hair . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Texas guitar tornado Johnny Winter and British keyboardist Ian McLagan both play something that might be considered roots music, although those roots didn't run any too deep when they played Thursday at the Coach House. That's not a condemnation by any means: America's native music is as effective a launching pad as it is a foundation. And to limited degrees, each performer has taken off on his own path.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1992 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Johnny Winter sings about "The Illustrated Man," he's not referring to the Rod Steiger movie. Covered in tattoos as loud, garish and colorful as his screaming brand of blues-rock, Winter blew into the Belly Up Tavern like a Texas monsoon Wednesday night, his pinkish-white, albino skin a stark canvas for the intricate ink work. Winter has been performing nationally for almost a quarter of a century now, but little has changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1992 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Johnny Winter sings about "The Illustrated Man," he's not referring to the Rod Steiger movie. Covered in tattoos as loud, garish and colorful as his screaming brand of blues-rock, Winter blew into the Belly Up Tavern like a Texas monsoon Wednesday night, his pinkish-white, albino skin a stark canvas for the intricate ink work. Winter has been performing nationally for almost a quarter of a century now, but little has changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2009
I enjoyed Randy Lewis' album review ("Groovy Sounds, Again," Aug. 9). In late June Sony/Legacy released a series of Woodstock recordings titled "The Woodstock Experience" featuring complete sets by Johnny Winter, Santana, Sly & the Family Stone, Jefferson Airplane and Janis Joplin. Joplin's set is a revelation. It's a shame the Who's set has not been released; I have the bootleg of their performance, and it's quite good. Greg Stanford Sherman Oaks
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2009 | Randy Lewis
The annual Long Beach Blues Festival will be topped in September by Mavis Staples, Bobby Womack, Kenny Wayne Shepherd and the Blind Boys of Alabama for the 30th anniversary of the yearly fundraiser for Cal State Long Beach-based jazz and blues radio station KKJZ-FM (88.1). The festival will run Sept. 5 and 6 at Rainbow Lagoon Park, and also will feature the Funky Meters, Johnny Winter, Sonny Landreth, Bettye Lavette, the Homemade Jamz Blues Band, Diunna Greenleaf, the Andy Walo Trio and the Hill Country Revue.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
"Stormy Monday" figured to be a mighty popular song at the 11th annual Long Beach Blues Festival at Cal State Long Beach on Saturday. This year's event was dedicated to T-Bone Walker, who wrote that classic blues, but none of Saturday's headliners mentioned Walker. Nor were there any references to another Texas blues guitarzan, the late Stevie Ray Vaughan.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The gig: As the head of Sterling Venue Ventures, Lance Sterling runs the recently renovated Saban Theatre concert venue in Beverly Hills and also owns and operates the Canyon Club in Agoura Hills. Early days: Sterling, 51, studied civil engineering at the University of Arizona. While in school, he worked in bars, nightclubs and concert venues that booked groups such as Grand Funk Railroad. "I was making more money running concerts than I would as an engineer," he said. After college, he briefly worked for a billboard company and then went into the hotel business.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN
* Bonnie Raitt, right, Shawn Colvin, Bruce Hornsby and David Lindley will team up as a unit at the Greek Theatre on Sept. 14. Tickets go on sale Sunday. . . . Tickets go on sale Saturday for the Watcha Tour, a rock en espan~ol package Aug. 15 at the Greek Theatre featuring Cafe Tacuba, Molotov, Illya Kuryaki, Control Machete and many more. . . . Tickets will be available Thursday for the Freestylers on Aug. 4 at the Hollywood Athletic Club and Machine Head Aug. 12 at the Palace. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Texas guitar tornado Johnny Winter and British keyboardist Ian McLagan both play something that might be considered roots music, although those roots didn't run any too deep when they played Thursday at the Coach House. That's not a condemnation by any means: America's native music is as effective a launching pad as it is a foundation. And to limited degrees, each performer has taken off on his own path.
NEWS
September 6, 1990
In a high point of a very bluesy week, "the Queen of the Blues," Koko Taylor will open for Johnny Winter Friday night at the Ventura Theatre. Winter is an accomplished blues guitarist, and Taylor has a Grammy and 10 W. C. Handy awards, the blues version of the Oscars. She is not only honored but also busy. Taylor averages more than 200 shows a year. Her first hit came in 1964 when she recorded Willie Dixon's "Wang Dang Doodle" for Chess Records. And how's this for odd?
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