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HEALTH
June 1, 1998
Eli Kahn, 6. Heather Brogdon, 12. Keith Patrick, 20. Three youngsters. Three backgrounds. One disease: cancer. The other common denominators--bravery, loving families, Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore--helped them and their families get through the battle. Harry Connolly documented Eli's and Heather's and Keith's lives for three years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | Frederick N. Rasmussen
Dr. John M. Freeman, a longtime Johns Hopkins University pediatric neurologist and medical ethicist who was known as an expert in pediatric epilepsy, died Jan. 3 of cardiovascular disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He was 80. His death was announced by Johns Hopkins. Dr. Freeman's iconoclastic questioning of established medical practices revolutionized the treatment of pediatric epilepsy and became the hallmark of his work. He became a forceful advocate of two long-abandoned therapies - one that required a strict, unconventional high-fat ketogenic diet known as KD, the other involving surgery to remove half of the brain of children who were tormented by unremitting epileptic seizures - which led to their revival and current acceptance as effective treatments.
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NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The prestigious Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, seeking to ensure a "drug-free environment," announced plans to become the nation's first hospital to routinely test doctors for drug and alcohol use. Johns Hopkins' plan for random screening of 750 doctors is believed to be the first time such tests have been imposed on physicians at a hospital, said Dr. Hamilton Moses III, Hopkins' vice president for medical affairs.
NEWS
March 31, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Hands-free electronic faucets can save a lot of water -- and because you don't have to touch them with your grubby fingers to turn them on, have widely been assumed to help fight the spread of germs, too.   But a team at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore has discovered that at their facility, electronic faucets were more likely to be contaminated with Legionella bacteria than the old-fashioned manual type.   So much more likely that the hospital actually ripped out the new-fangled plumbing in patient care areas, and elected to purchase traditional fixtures for new clinical buildings that are set to open in 2012.
NEWS
July 5, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For the third consecutive year, the Johns Hopkins Hospital has been rated the best hospital in the United States in U.S. News & World Report's annual survey of American hospitals. But this year, the news magazine used what it said was a more sophisticated method to measure excellence, taking into account death rates, technology, nurse-to-bed ratios and other "objective" criteria along with an opinion survey of 2,400 physicians.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | United Press International
A former Johns Hopkins Hospital cardiologist filed a $35-million suit against the hospital Thursday, claiming that it allowed word that he had AIDS to leak out among his colleagues and ruin his career. Hacib Aoun, 32, of Baltimore, who is married and has a 1-year-old child, said in his lawsuit that he contracted AIDS while treating a patient at Hopkins in February, 1983. He was cut on his finger when a glass tube of blood withdrawn from the patient broke.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | Associated Press
Benjamin and Patrick Binder, the West German twins born joined at the skull and separated by surgeons last month, continue to recuperate but their recovery is complicated by fever, Johns Hopkins Hospital said Thursday. The 8-month-old boys, separated in a 22-hour operation, seem to be suffering from some sort of infection and their temperatures exceeded 100 degrees overnight, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
May 2, 1985 | Associated Press
Milton S. Eisenhower, adviser to eight Presidents, including his brother, Dwight D. Eisenhower, died today at Johns Hopkins Hospital, a Johns Hopkins University spokeswoman said. He was 95. Eisenhower had been in and out of the hospital in recent months with a variety of ailments, the spokeswoman said. The youngest of the seven Eisnhower brothers, Milton served his brother Dwight as a special ambassador to Latin America. He also served in the Roosevelt, Johnson and Kennedy administrations.
NEWS
April 6, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Benjamin and Patrick Binder, the Siamese twins who were born joined at the head and then separated in an unprecedented surgical marathon seven months ago, will be released from the hospital this week to begin what doctors hope will eventually be normal lives, officials said Tuesday. The 14-month-old boys, who will return to their native West Germany with their parents, still face challenges to develop their speech and motor skills, vision and mental capacities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | Frederick N. Rasmussen
Dr. John M. Freeman, a longtime Johns Hopkins University pediatric neurologist and medical ethicist who was known as an expert in pediatric epilepsy, died Jan. 3 of cardiovascular disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He was 80. His death was announced by Johns Hopkins. Dr. Freeman's iconoclastic questioning of established medical practices revolutionized the treatment of pediatric epilepsy and became the hallmark of his work. He became a forceful advocate of two long-abandoned therapies - one that required a strict, unconventional high-fat ketogenic diet known as KD, the other involving surgery to remove half of the brain of children who were tormented by unremitting epileptic seizures - which led to their revival and current acceptance as effective treatments.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Johns Hopkins reached a confidential settlement with the parents of a 2-year-old brain cancer patient who died after apparently receiving excessive levels of potassium in an intravenous feeding solution, both sides said. Staci Goldberg, a spokeswoman at Johns Hopkins Children's Center in Baltimore, said the hospital "accepted full responsibility for the tragic death" of Brianna Cohen. Gary A.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's one heart-wrenching scene in ABC News' stunning new documentary series, "Hopkins 24/7," which never fails to make producer Terry Wrong crumble into tears: A young female patient at Johns Hopkins Hospital learns from her oncologist that her cancer has returned and she has precious little time to live. "That is really a powerful moment," says Wrong. "It's a sacred moment for that woman and her family and even for the doctor."
HEALTH
June 1, 1998
Eli Kahn, 6. Heather Brogdon, 12. Keith Patrick, 20. Three youngsters. Three backgrounds. One disease: cancer. The other common denominators--bravery, loving families, Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore--helped them and their families get through the battle. Harry Connolly documented Eli's and Heather's and Keith's lives for three years.
NEWS
July 5, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For the third consecutive year, the Johns Hopkins Hospital has been rated the best hospital in the United States in U.S. News & World Report's annual survey of American hospitals. But this year, the news magazine used what it said was a more sophisticated method to measure excellence, taking into account death rates, technology, nurse-to-bed ratios and other "objective" criteria along with an opinion survey of 2,400 physicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When an American doctor in the wide-ranging WNET-BBC co-production "Medicine at the Crossroads" describes physician-patient relations as a "Beirut" situation, you have to wonder if the doctor's defensiveness isn't getting the better of him. But if you follow this four-week, eight-part series as it explores and confronts long-held medical assumptions, the doctor's opinion becomes clearer.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The prestigious Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, seeking to ensure a "drug-free environment," announced plans to become the nation's first hospital to routinely test doctors for drug and alcohol use. Johns Hopkins' plan for random screening of 750 doctors is believed to be the first time such tests have been imposed on physicians at a hospital, said Dr. Hamilton Moses III, Hopkins' vice president for medical affairs.
NEWS
March 31, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Hands-free electronic faucets can save a lot of water -- and because you don't have to touch them with your grubby fingers to turn them on, have widely been assumed to help fight the spread of germs, too.   But a team at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore has discovered that at their facility, electronic faucets were more likely to be contaminated with Legionella bacteria than the old-fashioned manual type.   So much more likely that the hospital actually ripped out the new-fangled plumbing in patient care areas, and elected to purchase traditional fixtures for new clinical buildings that are set to open in 2012.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's one heart-wrenching scene in ABC News' stunning new documentary series, "Hopkins 24/7," which never fails to make producer Terry Wrong crumble into tears: A young female patient at Johns Hopkins Hospital learns from her oncologist that her cancer has returned and she has precious little time to live. "That is really a powerful moment," says Wrong. "It's a sacred moment for that woman and her family and even for the doctor."
NEWS
April 6, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Benjamin and Patrick Binder, the Siamese twins who were born joined at the head and then separated in an unprecedented surgical marathon seven months ago, will be released from the hospital this week to begin what doctors hope will eventually be normal lives, officials said Tuesday. The 14-month-old boys, who will return to their native West Germany with their parents, still face challenges to develop their speech and motor skills, vision and mental capacities.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | Associated Press
Benjamin and Patrick Binder, the West German twins born joined at the skull and separated by surgeons last month, continue to recuperate but their recovery is complicated by fever, Johns Hopkins Hospital said Thursday. The 8-month-old boys, separated in a 22-hour operation, seem to be suffering from some sort of infection and their temperatures exceeded 100 degrees overnight, a hospital spokeswoman said.
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