Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohns Hopkins University
IN THE NEWS

Johns Hopkins University

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
Johns Hopkins University President Steven Muller, one of the nation's longest-serving university presidents, has announced that he will resign on June 30, 1990. Muller, 61, who has been president of the university for 17 years, did not say Wednesday what he will do after he resigns.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2013
Jozef Glemp Polish cardinal Cardinal Jozef Glemp, 83, the head of Poland's influential Roman Catholic church from 1981 to 2004 - a time when it played a historic role in the fight against communism - died Wednesday in Warsaw. Jozef Kloch, a church spokesman, said in a statement that Glemp had been ill for many years, and the Polish news agency PAP said he had lung cancer. Glemp oversaw the church at a critical time in its history and that of Poland. He was the primate for most of the papacy of the Polish-born Pope John Paul II, who was elected pope in 1979.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2009 | Patricia Sullivan
Philip D. Curtin, a historian of the African slave trade who after World War II was a leading figure in reviving the neglected field of African history, has died. He was 87. Curtin, who was awarded a MacArthur Foundation grant in 1983, died June 4 of pneumonia at Chester County Hospital in West Chester, Pa.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | Associated Press
The president of Johns Hopkins University is leaving to head the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. "The fit was extremely good," said William C. Richardson, university president since July, 1990. Richardson, 54, will become president of the nation's second-largest foundation on Aug. 1. He succeeds Russell G. Mawby, who is retiring after 25 years.
NATIONAL
May 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Dr. Michael J. Klag, a Johns Hopkins University physician and administrator who spearheaded the reform of research practices at the Baltimore medical school, will become the new dean of the campus' Bloomberg School of Public Health, the university announced. Among the first doctors to document and explain the rising problem of kidney disease in America, Klag, 52, was chosen from more than 100 candidates to succeed Dr. Alfred Sommer, who will step down in September after 15 years on the job.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Nearly 6,000 books, photographs and letters by and about H.L. Mencken have been acquired by Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore from the estate of an accountant with a penchant for the curmudgeonly journalist. George H. Thompson began collecting Mencken-related material in 1962 and continued until his death last year, said Cynthia Requardt, a curator at the Sheridan Libraries.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | The Washington Post
Johns Hopkins University announced Monday that it has received a $50-million challenge grant, the largest donation for arts and sciences ever made to any university. The Krieger Fund, founded by Baltimore lawyer and investor Zanvyl Krieger, a Hopkins alumnus, will match--dollar for dollar up to $50 million--every donation made in the next five years to the financially pinched School of Arts and Sciences. Hopkins President William C.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1991 | Dean Takahashi/Times staff writer
Recording contracts: Odetics, a high-tech manufacturer in Anaheim, has won contracts to build 12 of its space recorders worth $28.8 million. Under a contract with Nippon Electric Co. in Japan, Odetics will deliver 10 space recorders for use in an observation satellite program. The company will also deliver two space recorders to the applied physics laboratory of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Victor A. McKusick, the Johns Hopkins University physician who is widely regarded as the father of medical genetics, died Tuesday at his home in Baltimore. He was 86 and died of complications from cancer. McKusick was a pioneer in linking diseases to specific genes and began the first database of gene functions, a repository that now includes more than 18,000 human genes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2007 | Tod Goldberg, Special to The Times
IT'S been 20 years since Max Apple's last work of fiction and more than a decade since his memoir of life with his grandfather, "Roommates," became a national hit, spawning the movie of the same name starring Peter Falk. In the intervening years, Apple has kept a relatively low profile; his short fiction periodically shows up in magazines and journals, and he teaches writing at the University of Pennsylvania.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2007 | Patricia Sullivan, The Washington Post
Dr. Martin D. Abeloff, an international authority on the treatment of breast cancer and chief oncologist and director of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University for the last 15 years, died of leukemia Friday at the center in Baltimore. He was 65. Abeloff specialized in solid-tumor research, treatment of lung and breast cancer, and the transfer of research findings from the laboratory to the clinic.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Nearly 6,000 books, photographs and letters by and about H.L. Mencken have been acquired by Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore from the estate of an accountant with a penchant for the curmudgeonly journalist. George H. Thompson began collecting Mencken-related material in 1962 and continued until his death last year, said Cynthia Requardt, a curator at the Sheridan Libraries.
BOOKS
February 11, 2007 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author of many books, including "Elia Kazan: A Biography" and, most recently, with George Perry and Stephen Bogart, "Bogie: A Celebration of the Life and Films of Humphrey Bogart."
FILM noir remains a genre in search of its roots -- and perhaps even a proper definition. That's because, unlike other genres (westerns, musicals, romantic comedies), it was not identified as one until dozens, perhaps hundreds, of movies in the noir vein had been made. In the 1940s, no one in Hollywood -- asked what he or she was currently doing -- would have replied, "Oh, you know, a nice little noir over at Warner Bros."
NATIONAL
May 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Dr. Michael J. Klag, a Johns Hopkins University physician and administrator who spearheaded the reform of research practices at the Baltimore medical school, will become the new dean of the campus' Bloomberg School of Public Health, the university announced. Among the first doctors to document and explain the rising problem of kidney disease in America, Klag, 52, was chosen from more than 100 candidates to succeed Dr. Alfred Sommer, who will step down in September after 15 years on the job.
NEWS
September 29, 1986
In the first trial studies of their kind in the United States, diabetes specialists from the University of California, Irvine, and Johns Hopkins University have been given approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to surgically implant insulin pumps, UCI officials said.
BOOKS
August 3, 2003 | Robert Del Tredici, Robert Del Tredici, author of "At Work in the Fields of the Bomb" and founder of the Atomic Photographers Guild, is a documentary photographer specializing in nuclear weapons.
There was a time not long ago when we pitted our brains against the Bomb. In the 1980s, antiwar activist Helen Caldecott compelled us to watch while she opened the gates of hell over our cities; Jonathan Schell broke the world's heart in "The Fate of the Earth," with his depiction of a full-scale nuclear exchange and its aftermath of nuclear winter and human extinction; and psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton pondered parallels between Nazi and nuclear genocidal mentalities.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2003 | Nick Owchar, Times Staff Writer
Look at Rembrandt's 1654 painting, "Bathsheba at Her Bath," and you quickly understand why the Dutch painter was a master of light and shadow. King David's concubine, in all her ample, naked glory, sits in a warm, coppery light. All else, including the servant who carefully wipes between her toes, is lost in murk and shadow. Of course that must have been the painter's intent: It is impossible, as it was for David, to keep one's eyes off the voluptuous body of this woman. But T.C.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|