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BUSINESS
September 8, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Amgen Inc. and Johnson & Johnson may have to limit doses of anemia drugs to lower risks for patients, U.S. regulators said Friday. The change would reduce revenue from the top-selling medicines. The anemia drugs, marketed as Aranesp and Epogen by Amgen and Procrit by J&J, raised the danger of heart attacks, strokes and death at high doses, staff of the Food and Drug Administration said in an analysis posted on the agency's website.
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HEALTH
January 30, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When kids begin sniffling, the first thing many parents reach for is Children's Tylenol. But that option has been off the table ? or, out of the medicine cabinet ? since a massive recall last year. Nine months later, the Johnson & Johnson unit that was responsible is still ironing out its problems, and there's little indication of when parents will be able to turn to the brand. But medical experts say that when it comes to treating sick kids, there are still plenty of options. "The nice thing about this situation is that there are other alternatives to name brands," said Dr. Daniel Frattarelli, chairman of pediatrics at Oakwood Hospital in Dearborn, Mich.
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BUSINESS
August 1, 2007 | From Reuters
Johnson & Johnson said Tuesday that it would cut as many as 4,800 jobs in hopes the savings would offset falling sales of its stents, its anemia drug Procrit and two blockbuster drugs that would soon face generic competition. The company said it expected the plan to generate pretax savings of $1.3 billion to $1.6 billion in 2008, or about 3% of its current cost base.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2011 | Reuters
Johnson & Johnson, citing lax cleaning procedures and other problems at a manufacturing plant at the center of massive recalls of nonprescription drugs such as Tylenol, said Friday that it was recalling tens of millions more bottles. The company, whose reputation has been tarnished by the recalls, is recalling bottles and packages of various kinds of Tylenol, Benadryl, Rolaids and other consumer products, it said. J&J said it completed an investigation of historical records dating to 2007 for products sold in the U.S. and produced by its McNeil consumer healthcare unit, which makes most of the recalled products.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2011 | Reuters
Johnson & Johnson, citing lax cleaning procedures and other problems at a manufacturing plant at the center of massive recalls of nonprescription drugs such as Tylenol, said Friday that it was recalling tens of millions more bottles. The company, whose reputation has been tarnished by the recalls, is recalling bottles and packages of various kinds of Tylenol, Benadryl, Rolaids and other consumer products, it said. J&J said it completed an investigation of historical records dating to 2007 for products sold in the U.S. and produced by its McNeil consumer healthcare unit, which makes most of the recalled products.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2010
LITIGATION $1.73-billion settlement in stent suits Johnson & Johnson said Boston Scientific Corp. would pay $1.73 billion to settle two suits related to patents for medical stents. Natick, Mass.-based Boston Scientific faces additional court challenges to its Promus stent products, including a lawsuit by Cordis Corp. Stents are mesh-wire tubes used to hold arteries open after they are surgically cleared of blockages. ACQUISITIONS Hummer sale is delayed a month General Motors Co.'s plan to sell the once-hot Hummer line to a Chinese heavy-equipment maker has been delayed by a month.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2009 | Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Stocks are slightly lower in early trading after a mixed report from Johnson & Johnson. The health care products maker, the first among a number of key companies this week to issue quarterly results, says its sales fell 5 percent in the third quarter, more than expected. Its profit rose 1 percent, narrowly beating expectations. A drop in the dollar is helping to mitigate the market's losses, sending commodity-related stocks higher. Meanwhile, news that Cisco Systems has agreed to buy Starent Networks for $2.9 billion is helping to boost the technology-heavy Nasdaq composite index.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac
Tribune Washington Bureau The Food and Drug Administration, alarmed by quality-control problems with children's Tylenol and other Johnson & Johnson medications, prodded senior company officials last February to improve manufacturing and react faster to consumer complaints, a senior agency official told a congressional panel Thursday.  But promised improvements didn't come quickly enough, and it was not until April 30 that the company — under FDA pressure — announced the largest recall of pediatric over-the-counter medicine in history.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2009 | Associated Press
Johnson & Johnson, making a big jump into the risky but potentially lucrative field of Alzheimer's disease, is taking a major stake in Irish biopharmaceutical company Elan Corp., investing up to $1.5 billion initially. The two companies will cooperate to complete research on two injected drugs aimed at stopping the progression of the mind-robbing disease and on a vaccine to prevent the buildup of plaque in the brain that causes increasing memory loss, confusion, wandering and aggression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Robert L. McNeil Jr., a Philadelphia chemist who developed a little-known pain reliever called paracetamol into the global blockbuster Tylenol, creating a fortune that he freely distributed to charities, universities and museums, died May 20 of a heart ailment at his home in Wyndmoor, Pa. He was 94. McNeil was not a brilliant synthetic chemist discovering new compounds through long hours in the laboratory, said Arnold Thackray of the nonprofit Chemical...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Robert L. McNeil Jr., a Philadelphia chemist who developed a little-known pain reliever called paracetamol into the global blockbuster Tylenol, creating a fortune that he freely distributed to charities, universities and museums, died May 20 of a heart ailment at his home in Wyndmoor, Pa. He was 94. McNeil was not a brilliant synthetic chemist discovering new compounds through long hours in the laboratory, said Arnold Thackray of the nonprofit Chemical...
NATIONAL
May 28, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac
Tribune Washington Bureau The Food and Drug Administration, alarmed by quality-control problems with children's Tylenol and other Johnson & Johnson medications, prodded senior company officials last February to improve manufacturing and react faster to consumer complaints, a senior agency official told a congressional panel Thursday.  But promised improvements didn't come quickly enough, and it was not until April 30 that the company — under FDA pressure — announced the largest recall of pediatric over-the-counter medicine in history.
NATIONAL
May 27, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac, Tribune Washington Bureau
A Pennsylvania drug plant plagued by quality-control problems that prompted a nationwide recall of children's Tylenol and dozens of other pediatric medicines drastically reduced its workforce in recent years, according to local government tax records. And a Food and Drug Administration inspection report earlier this year cited failure to properly train contract and temporary employees as part of a catalogue of problems at the plant run by McNeil Consumer Healthcare, a subsidiary of pharmaceuticals giant Johnson & Johnson.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2010
LITIGATION $1.73-billion settlement in stent suits Johnson & Johnson said Boston Scientific Corp. would pay $1.73 billion to settle two suits related to patents for medical stents. Natick, Mass.-based Boston Scientific faces additional court challenges to its Promus stent products, including a lawsuit by Cordis Corp. Stents are mesh-wire tubes used to hold arteries open after they are surgically cleared of blockages. ACQUISITIONS Hummer sale is delayed a month General Motors Co.'s plan to sell the once-hot Hummer line to a Chinese heavy-equipment maker has been delayed by a month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2010 | By Andrew Blankstein
Casey Johnson was an heiress to one of the world's great fortunes, grew up privileged in Manhattan with socialite sisters Paris and Nicky Hilton and eventually moved to Los Angeles, where she became a familiar face on the Hollywood party scene. But amid a gilded existence, Johnson also struggled. She was diagnosed with diabetes, battled drug addiction, had strained relations with her family and last month was hit with criminal charges for allegedly breaking into the home of a girlfriend and taking $22,000 in property.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2009 | Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Stocks are slightly lower in early trading after a mixed report from Johnson & Johnson. The health care products maker, the first among a number of key companies this week to issue quarterly results, says its sales fell 5 percent in the third quarter, more than expected. Its profit rose 1 percent, narrowly beating expectations. A drop in the dollar is helping to mitigate the market's losses, sending commodity-related stocks higher. Meanwhile, news that Cisco Systems has agreed to buy Starent Networks for $2.9 billion is helping to boost the technology-heavy Nasdaq composite index.
NATIONAL
May 27, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac, Tribune Washington Bureau
A Pennsylvania drug plant plagued by quality-control problems that prompted a nationwide recall of children's Tylenol and dozens of other pediatric medicines drastically reduced its workforce in recent years, according to local government tax records. And a Food and Drug Administration inspection report earlier this year cited failure to properly train contract and temporary employees as part of a catalogue of problems at the plant run by McNeil Consumer Healthcare, a subsidiary of pharmaceuticals giant Johnson & Johnson.
HEALTH
January 30, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When kids begin sniffling, the first thing many parents reach for is Children's Tylenol. But that option has been off the table ? or, out of the medicine cabinet ? since a massive recall last year. Nine months later, the Johnson & Johnson unit that was responsible is still ironing out its problems, and there's little indication of when parents will be able to turn to the brand. But medical experts say that when it comes to treating sick kids, there are still plenty of options. "The nice thing about this situation is that there are other alternatives to name brands," said Dr. Daniel Frattarelli, chairman of pediatrics at Oakwood Hospital in Dearborn, Mich.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2009 | Associated Press
Johnson & Johnson, making a big jump into the risky but potentially lucrative field of Alzheimer's disease, is taking a major stake in Irish biopharmaceutical company Elan Corp., investing up to $1.5 billion initially. The two companies will cooperate to complete research on two injected drugs aimed at stopping the progression of the mind-robbing disease and on a vaccine to prevent the buildup of plaque in the brain that causes increasing memory loss, confusion, wandering and aggression.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2009 | Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson won U.S. approval of a rheumatoid arthritis drug designed to be injected less often than its top-selling product, Remicade. The Food and Drug Administration on Friday announced its decision on the medicine, golimumab. The drug, to be co-marketed outside the U.S. by Schering-Plough Corp., will compete with Amgen Inc.'s Enbrel and Abbott Laboratories' Humira. Remicade produced more than $5 billion in revenue last year, according to the data research firm IMS Health Inc.
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