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BUSINESS
December 30, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America Online, the nation's most popular online service, is based in Arlington, Va., but is quietly assembling a sizable research presence in Orange County. The company already has about 110 employees in Newport Beach and plans to more than double the size of its Orange County staff after moving early next year into a new business park being constructed near the UC Irvine campus by the Irvine Co. AOL stepped into Orange County earlier this year when it acquired Johnson-Grace Co.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 1996 | GREG MILLER
Johnson-Grace Co., which developed a technology that helps speed up transmission of digital computer data, has been acquired by its biggest customer, America Online Inc., the companies said Thursday. America Online, a Vienna, Va.-based computer online service, paid 1.6 million shares of its common stock, valued at about $70 million, to Johnson-Grace shareholders.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1996 | GREG MILLER
Johnson-Grace Co., which developed a technology that helps speed up transmission of digital computer data, has been acquired by its biggest customer, America Online Inc., the companies said Thursday. America Online, a Vienna, Va.-based computer online service, paid 1.6 million shares of its common stock, valued at about $70 million, to Johnson-Grace shareholders.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America Online, the nation's most popular online service, is based in Arlington, Va., but is quietly assembling a sizable research presence in Orange County. The company already has about 110 employees in Newport Beach and plans to more than double the size of its Orange County staff after moving early next year into a new business park being constructed near the UC Irvine campus by the Irvine Co. AOL stepped into Orange County earlier this year when it acquired Johnson-Grace Co.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1995 | ROSS KERBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 36 straight hours at work and dozens of cans of Pepsi, programmers at Telegrafix Communications Inc. came up with a way to bypass a widely used, patented code for transmitting photos and graphics between computers. As it turns out, the small Huntington Beach company may never send out the program. Still, the staff at Telegrafix sees itself as having struck a blow for freedom in on-line software distribution. Compuserve Inc.
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