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BUSINESS
February 3, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Drug manufacturer Johnson & Johnson said its fourth-quarter earnings rose 12%, boosted by the introduction of new products and overall sales growth. For the period ended Dec. 31, profit totaled $307 million, or 47 cents a share, up from $274 million, or 41 cents a share in the 1991 quarter. Revenue was $3.5 billion, up 11.3% from $3.15 billion in the year-ago quarter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2014 | By David Ng
After a two-year stay, Marilyn Monroe is saying farewell to Palm Springs. "Forever Marilyn," the three-story-tall sculpture by artist Seward Johnson, will be dismantled this week so that the leggy tourist attraction can be shipped to its next location, the Grounds for Sculpture in central New Jersey. But there is already talk of bringing the blond bombshell back to Palm Springs -- permanently. Some local leaders believe the artwork embodies the city's glamorous history, and they want to purchase it. "We are determined to bring Marilyn back to us 'forever.'  It is where she belongs," said  Aftab Dada, chairman of PS Resorts, a local tourism organization that helped to pay for the sculpture's visit.
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BUSINESS
June 11, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson said an additional incident of counterfeiting involving the Procrit anemia drug has been found, the second time in a week the drug maker reported that some of the medicine was diluted. In a letter dated Friday, the company told doctors and other health-care professionals to watch for Procrit with Lot No. P002384.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Rick Rojas
PALM SPRINGS - On a bright and breezy afternoon, the continuous stream of tourists queued up on a bustling downtown corner for their moment with Marilyn. The icon loomed some 26 feet high in a re-creation of that classic image of Monroe in the air-blown white dress. She seemed blissfully oblivious as one person after another posed between her legs, resting a hand on her calf. A few climbed up onto her stilettos. "It's always like this!" Mayor Steve Pougnet said, standing amid the crowd that had assembled on a weekday afternoon.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson, the world's biggest maker of medical devices, said late Wednesday that it agreed to buy defibrillator maker Guidant Corp. for $25.4 billion to gain electrical devices for treating heart disease. In the deal, which had been rumored since last week, New Brunswick, N.J.-based J&J would pay $76 for each share of Indianapolis-based Guidant, 40% of it in cash and the balance in stock, J&J said in a statement. The price for Guidant shares is 10.5% more than on Dec.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson, one of the world's largest healthcare product makers, bought closely held Egea Biosciences Inc. Terms weren't disclosed. San Diego-based Egea, which has about 39 employees, will join Johnson & Johnson's Centocor unit. Egea's technologies will help Centocor -- which introduced one of the earliest antibody medicines, ReoPro -- develop other protein-based biotechnology medicines. Shares of New Brunswick, N.J.-based Johnson & Johnson fell 7 cents to $54.63 on the NYSE.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson's third-quarter profit jumped 19%, helped by demand for medical devices and the arthritis medication Remicade. Net income at the world's fourth-biggest drug maker rose to $1.8 billion, or 60 cents a share, from $1.5 billion, or 49 cents, in the year-earlier period. Sales at the New Brunswick, N.J.-based company climbed 13% to $9.1 billion. Johnson & Johnson shares rose $1.73 cents to $59.56 on the NYSE.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson, the world's largest maker of medical devices, said second-quarter earnings dropped 27% on costs for acquisitions and a decline in revenue from its biggest drug, Procrit for anemia. The company also said it was struggling to meet orders for the Cypher heart stent, a drug-coated mesh tube that keeps blood flowing through arteries. Net income fell to $1.21 billion, or 40 cents a share, from $1.65 billion, or 54 cents, a year earlier, the New Brunswick, N.J.-based company said.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson Co.'s LifeScan plant in Milpitas, Calif., was searched by investigators for the Justice Department and the Food and Drug Administration for evidence of possible criminal violations, the company and a law enforcement official said. The U.S.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson's fourth-quarter profit increased 30% as the drug maker sold more of the painkiller Duragesic and the arthritis medicine Remicade. Net income rose to $1.4 billion, or 48 cents a share, from $1.1 billion, or 36 cents, in the year-ago period, said Johnson & Johnson. Sales climbed 14% to $9.4 billion. Shares of New Brunswick, N.J.-based Johnson & Johnson fell 80 cents to $53.99 on the NYSE.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Johnson & Johnson will pay more than $2.2 billion in criminal and civil fines for marketing drugs Risperdal, Invega and Natrecor for uses they weren't approved for, the U.S. Justice Department announced Monday. The settlement, one the largest settlements of its kind, also covers charges that the company paid kickbacks to doctors and pharmacies promoting the drugs, the Justice Department said.  “The conduct at issue in this case jeopardized the health and safety of patients and damaged the public trust,” said Atty.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
The one piece of Obamacare that seems genuinely to be on the table in the shutdown standoff is the medical device tax, a 2.3% levy mostly on hospital devices designed to produce $30 billion in revenue over ten years. You can mark down the bipartisan opposition to this tax as a triumph of Big Business lobbying. A s we reported in May , the industry, which mostly comprises mega-manufacturers such as Johnson & Johnson, has attacked the tax with a raft of dubious claims and statistics.
SPORTS
July 13, 2013
The Lakers agreed to terms with 6-foot-7 swingman Wesley Johnson on a one-year deal Saturday for the veteran's minimum of $1 million. Johnson, 26, was the fourth pick in the 2010 draft and played last season with Phoenix, where he averaged eight points and 19.1 minutes. His playing time increased when Lindsey Hunter was promoted to head coach near the midpoint of last season. Johnson had a season-high 15 points in a March game against Atlanta. The Lakers are also trying to sign Jordan Farmar but are in involved in a complicated buyout negotiation with his pro team in Turkey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Barbara Piasecka Johnson, a former chambermaid who married into the Johnson & Johnson pharmaceutical family and walked away with part of its epic fortune after a bitterly contested battle over her husband's will, died Monday in her native Poland. She was 76. Her office, BPJ Holdings, in Princeton, N.J., said she died after a long illness. One of the world's richest women, she was a longtime resident of Monaco. Known as Basia, in 1971 she became the third wife of J. Seward Johnson, a son of Johnson & Johnson co-founder Robert Wood Johnson and a director of the New Brunswick, N.J.-based company for 50 years.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles jury said healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson was negligent by selling a defective artificial hip and ordered the company to pay a retired prison guard $8.3 million in damages for his injuries. But in a victory for the company, the 12-member jury declined to award any punitive damages even though the patient's lawyer told jurors J&J's actions warranted up to $179 million in damages. Friday's verdict marks the first in more than 10,000 similar suits filed against the world's biggest medical-products maker over this all-metal hip introduced in 2005 by DePuy, the orthopedic division of J&J. At the five-week trial, Loren Kransky, a 65-year-old former prison guard in Montana, testified that he suffered metal poisoning and other health problems from the company's ASR XL hip implant he received in 2007.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
A Los Angeles jury Friday ordered healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson to pay $8 million in damages to a retired prison guard who said he was injured by the company's defective artificial hip. But in a victory for the company, the 12-member jury declined to levy any punitive damages, despite being told by the guard's lawyer that J&J's behavior warranted up to $179 million. This marks the first verdict in more than 8,000 similar suits filed against the world's biggest medical-products maker over this all-metal hip introduced in 2005 by DePuy, the orthopedic division of J&J. In this case, Loren Kransky, a 65-year-old former prison guard in Montana, claimed that he suffered metal poisoning and other health problems from the company's ASR XL hip implant he received in 2007.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson won clearance from the Federal Trade Commission to buy biotechnology company Scios Inc. for $2.1 billion. The companies said they expected the cash deal to be completed "as promptly as possible" after Scios shareholders vote on the purchase April 28. Scios, which makes the heart drug Natrecor, agreed to a $45-a-share offer from Johnson & Johnson in February. Shares of Johnson & Johnson fell 95 cents to $57.46 on the NYSE. Shares of Sunnyvale, Calif.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
Closing arguments are set to begin Thursday in Los Angeles in a high-stakes trial where healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson is accused of negligence in designing and marketing a once-popular artificial hip. The case in Los Angeles County Superior Court pits the world's biggest maker of medical products against Loren Kransky, a 65-year-old former prison guard who claims he suffered metal poisoning and other health problems from the company's ASR...
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