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NEWS
November 29, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two former chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff criticized President Bush's decision to deploy more troops to the Persian Gulf and told a congressional hearing Wednesday that the United States should not take military action against Iraq until economic sanctions have been given more time to work.
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NEWS
October 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate confirmed Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, President Clinton's choice to head the Joint Chiefs of Staff. By voice vote, the Senate approved the four-star general, who succeeds retired Gen. Colin L. Powell as the Joint Chiefs chairman. Powell stepped down last week.
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NEWS
October 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate confirmed Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, President Clinton's choice to head the Joint Chiefs of Staff. By voice vote, the Senate approved the four-star general, who succeeds retired Gen. Colin L. Powell as the Joint Chiefs chairman. Powell stepped down last week.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two former chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff criticized President Bush's decision to deploy more troops to the Persian Gulf and told a congressional hearing Wednesday that the United States should not take military action against Iraq until economic sanctions have been given more time to work.
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. forces are freeing 43 Afghan prisoners, mostly of them mistakenly thought to be Al Qaeda or Taliban fighters, the Pentagon said. Twelve were released after being held for two weeks on suspicion that they were Iranians trying to destabilize the Afghan government. The others were captured Sunday at what U.S. forces thought was a Taliban or Al Qaeda compound. The 12 suspected Iranians turned out to be Afghans, said Brig. Gen. John W. Rosa Jr.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Maritime Task Force Established: With U.S.-flagged foreign trade commercial carriers threatening to re-register their ships under the flags of other nations to get out from under burdensome taxes and regulations, the government has established a high-ranking task force to study how to make the fleet more competitive. The Working Group on Commercial Maritime Policy, headed by Transportation Secretary Andrew Card, is expected to report its findings by May 22.
WORLD
November 28, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Top U.S. Navy officials sharply criticized China on Tuesday for refusing to allow U.S. warships to stop in Hong Kong last week, signaling a potential fracture in American-Chinese relations just a short time after a visit to Beijing by Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates. On Nov. 20, the Chinese refused to allow two minesweepers, the Patriot and Guardian, to enter Hong Kong to refuel and take refuge from a storm.
NEWS
March 31, 1986 | United Press International
President Corazon Aquino met with U.S. officials today and pledged to intervene in the 10-day-old strike by Filipino workers at eight U.S. military installations. Philippine soldiers fired warning shots today to prevent another clash between striking base workers and local bar girls and vendors angered because of money lost during the strike, which has kept the servicemen confined to their bases. The strikers and vendors clashed Sunday.
NEWS
December 22, 1990
Military Front: American forces in Saudi Arabia went on heightened alert as Israel, and possibly Iraq as well, conducted missile tests. Israel launched a Jericho-2 missile. There were reports that Iraq tested a Soviet-made Scud missile, but that could not be confirmed. The Israeli test caused some confusion among U.S. commanders, who initially were uncertain about the missile's origin. In Saudi Arabia, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and Colin L.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is making preliminary plans for deploying up to 20,000 U.S. ground troops to help with U.N. peacekeeping efforts in Bosnia-Herzegovina if talks in Geneva produce a peace accord to end the bitter conflict, U.S. officials said Monday. But President Clinton said no final decision will be made on the number of troops and how they will be deployed until he is certain that any peace agreement is "fair, fully embraced by the Bosnian government and is enforceable."
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bosnian Serb soldiers around Sarajevo continued to balk Tuesday at withdrawing artillery or turning it over to U.N. peacekeeping troops, marking the fourth day in a row they have essentially defied a NATO order to surrender their heavy weapons. Although U.S. and U.N. officials declined to provide specific figures, intelligence sources showed the total number of Serbian artillery pieces under U.N. control as of late Tuesday at only 33, with an additional seven such weapons turned over to U.N.
NEWS
February 13, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Two Soviet warships deliberately bumped two U.S. Navy ships Friday in Soviet-claimed waters in the Black Sea, Pentagon officials said. A Defense Department official said the U.S. government views the incident with "considerable concern," and the State Department filed an official protest with the Soviet Union over the incident.
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