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Joint Commission On Accreditation Of Healthcare Organizations

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BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hospital Accrediting Group Criticized: The consumer advocacy group Public Citizen claims the organization that accredits 80% of the nation's hospitals is so intertwined with the industry that it cannot be a rigorous advocate for safety and quality. Dr. Sidney Wolfe of Public Citizen said the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations continues to accredit hospitals because it views them as partners or customers to be kept satisfied.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2005 | Jack Leonard and Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writers
A national healthcare accrediting agency revoked its seal of approval Tuesday from troubled Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, a rare sanction that underscored repeated lapses in patient care at the hospital. The action will not lead to closure of the Los Angeles County-owned hospital in Willowbrook, south of Watts, but will mean that many private insurance companies will no longer pay for care there.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2004 | Charles Ornstein and Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writers
Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center moved a step closer Thursday to losing its national accreditation, a move that could threaten its doctor-training programs and $14.8 million in private insurance contracts. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations denied King/Drew's appeal of a preliminary decision to strip the hospital of its seal of approval. King/Drew plans to appeal once more, but commission officials have said it would be a longshot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2004 | Charles Ornstein and Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writers
Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center moved a step closer Thursday to losing its national accreditation, a move that could threaten its doctor-training programs and $14.8 million in private insurance contracts. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations denied King/Drew's appeal of a preliminary decision to strip the hospital of its seal of approval. King/Drew plans to appeal once more, but commission officials have said it would be a longshot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1989 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL and KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles County Health Services Director Robert Gates told the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday that a team of medical investigators from the agency that accredits most of the nation's hospitals will recommend that Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center in Watts retain its accreditation if the hospital can correct serious health care deficiencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1990 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following a last-ditch plea by Los Angeles County health officials, the agency that certifies most of the nation's hospitals on Friday placed Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center on conditional accreditation, temporarily avoiding a serious blow to the facility's residency programs and its public standing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1989 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
A team of medical investigators from the agency that accredits most of the nation's hospitals paid a surprise visit Wednesday to Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center to review first-hand reports of widespread health care violations at the county-operated facility.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1996 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state's selection of an outside contractor to help evaluate the medical quality of HMOs serving 13 million Californians has drawn strong protests from two unlikely allies: the HMO industry and consumer groups. The dispute erupted Monday, when the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, a private group that inspects and accredits most of the nation's hospitals, and a subsidiary of the California Medical Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1990 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A potentially serious blow to Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center was temporarily averted Friday when the agency that certifies most of the nation's hospitals postponed a vote on a recommendation to withdraw the facility's accreditation because of serious health care violations. The Chicago-based Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations said it would delay any action until it had a chance to officially notify King hospital officials of its staff's recommendation.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A prominent health care organization warned U.S. hospitals Wednesday to watch out for the return of a rare but preventable type of brain damage in newborns that has been on the rise with shorter hospital stays and increased breast-feeding. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, a health care accrediting group, issued an alert to 5,000 U.S. hospitals about kernicterus, a highly unusual condition that stems from severe jaundice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2004 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Reviewers from a national accrediting agency arrived Monday for unannounced inspections of four hospitals run by Los Angeles County to see if they are experiencing the same problems as the embattled Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A prominent health care organization warned U.S. hospitals Wednesday to watch out for the return of a rare but preventable type of brain damage in newborns that has been on the rise with shorter hospital stays and increased breast-feeding. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, a health care accrediting group, issued an alert to 5,000 U.S. hospitals about kernicterus, a highly unusual condition that stems from severe jaundice.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1996 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state's selection of an outside contractor to help evaluate the medical quality of HMOs serving 13 million Californians has drawn strong protests from two unlikely allies: the HMO industry and consumer groups. The dispute erupted Monday, when the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, a private group that inspects and accredits most of the nation's hospitals, and a subsidiary of the California Medical Assn.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hospital Accrediting Group Criticized: The consumer advocacy group Public Citizen claims the organization that accredits 80% of the nation's hospitals is so intertwined with the industry that it cannot be a rigorous advocate for safety and quality. Dr. Sidney Wolfe of Public Citizen said the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations continues to accredit hospitals because it views them as partners or customers to be kept satisfied.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1995 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
When Boston's Dana-Farber Cancer Research Institute was revealed to have mismanaged a breast cancer treatment protocol so badly that it killed one woman and crippled another, the prestigious hospital was quickly put on "probation." When health care providers at Tampa's University Community Hospital amputated the wrong leg of an elderly man and, in an unrelated incident, inadvertently disconnected a critically ill patient from life support, it was stripped of its accreditation. Probation ?
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Citing a wide range of deficiencies in fire safety and the ability to monitor the quality of medical care, the nation's major hospital review organization has placed Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center on conditional accreditation. This is the second major county hospital to be placed on conditional accreditation. Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center was placed on the same probationary status earlier this year.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1995 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
When Boston's Dana-Farber Cancer Research Institute was revealed to have mismanaged a breast cancer treatment protocol so badly that it killed one woman and crippled another, the prestigious hospital was quickly put on "probation." When health care providers at Tampa's University Community Hospital amputated the wrong leg of an elderly man and, in an unrelated incident, inadvertently disconnected a critically ill patient from life support, it was stripped of its accreditation. Probation ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2004 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Reviewers from a national accrediting agency arrived Monday for unannounced inspections of four hospitals run by Los Angeles County to see if they are experiencing the same problems as the embattled Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1990 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following a last-ditch plea by Los Angeles County health officials, the agency that certifies most of the nation's hospitals on Friday placed Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center on conditional accreditation, temporarily avoiding a serious blow to the facility's residency programs and its public standing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1990 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A potentially serious blow to Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center was temporarily averted Friday when the agency that certifies most of the nation's hospitals postponed a vote on a recommendation to withdraw the facility's accreditation because of serious health care violations. The Chicago-based Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations said it would delay any action until it had a chance to officially notify King hospital officials of its staff's recommendation.
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