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Joint Commission On The Accreditation Of Healthcare Organizations

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NEWS
May 25, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Citing deficiencies in the ability to monitor the quality of medical care, the nation's major hospital review organization has taken the unusual step of placing Loma Linda University Medical Center on conditional accreditation.
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NEWS
May 28, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The typical veterans hospital is considerably more likely than other hospitals to fail quality standards in key areas such as surgery, emergency care and intensive care, according to a major study by the commission that accredits most of the nation's health care facilities.
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NEWS
May 28, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The typical veterans hospital is considerably more likely than other hospitals to fail quality standards in key areas such as surgery, emergency care and intensive care, according to a major study by the commission that accredits most of the nation's health care facilities.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Citing deficiencies in the ability to monitor the quality of medical care, the nation's major hospital review organization has taken the unusual step of placing Loma Linda University Medical Center on conditional accreditation.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
OSHA, Accrediting Group in Pact: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration and a health-care accrediting organization, the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, have signed an agreement designed to make the health-care industry safer for workers. Workplace illness and injury rates are higher in hospitals and long-term-care facilities than in any other type of health-care organization, the commission's president said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2004 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
Consultants come and consultants go, but Anthony Jones was gone before he arrived. Los Angeles County announced in April that Jones, a hospital turnaround specialist, would take over temporary management of the troubled Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center. After that, Jones said Tuesday, he waited to hear more on when he would begin work. He said his phone never rang. The county's health department director, Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1990
Never let it be said that California legislators are at a loss for words to explain their needless deadlock on the state budget. "They left us with a bag of dog doo on our doorstep, lit it on fire, rang the doorbell and ran away," one Republican assemblyman told a reporter. Speaker Willie Brown, a Democrat, quipped back: "And we will not take it out of the bag. We will simply return it to its owners in its original form." What a pair of cards.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2003 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Tenet Healthcare Corp. reported Monday that its fiscal second-quarter profit more than tripled, but the nation's No. 2 hospital chain also warned investors not to expect similar results in the future because of anticipated cutbacks in its Medicare collections. Tenet's net income for the quarter ended Nov. 30 rose to $315 million, or 64 cents a share, from $89 million, or 18 cents, a year earlier.
NEWS
July 15, 1992 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson's proposal for massive cuts in state health programs is drawing fire from lawmakers in his own party who complain that some short-term reductions will impose long-term costs on government while others may deny essential medical care to the needy. The dissension within Republican ranks surfaced this week when two Assembly committees held hearings to invite public comment on the governor's proposals for $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1990 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The furor over funding shortages for public health intensified Monday in the wake of a critical report by the American College of Surgeons on trauma care at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center. The confidential report citing the hospital for serious lapses in care and "preventable deaths" was detailed in a story in The Times on Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move prompted by the growing crisis in the state Medi-Cal system and by financial motives, UCLA Medical Center this week began diverting indigent patients from its emergency room to Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, officials at both hospitals said. About 1,000 Medi-Cal patients are expected to be transferred each year from UCLA, mostly by ambulance, to the Hollywood hospital.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Violence inside hospitals was never included in any recruitment brochure of the nursing profession, says Vicki Sweet. Yet, during Sweet's 11-year career as an emergency room nurse, the subject was always on her mind. "We experience different levels of violence almost on a daily basis," Sweet said of emergency room staff members.
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