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NEWS
February 27, 1986
The City Council and the Unified School District Board of Education have scheduled a joint meeting Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at City Hall. The agenda will include the possibility of a community auditorium, consolidation of elections, an all-weather track and disposal of school property.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Feb. 10 - 16, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies       SERIES Wild Things With Dominic Monaghan:  Dom searches a remote cave in Venezuela rumored to house the world's largest centipede in this new episode (7 and 10 p.m. BBC America). Bobby McFerrin: A YoungArts Masterclass:  Four student vocalists receive instruction from the singer and later join him on stage in Germany (7:30 p.m. HBO)
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NEWS
September 6, 1990 | Times Wire Services
President Bush will deliver a nationally televised address to a joint session of Congress at 6 p.m. PDT next Tuesday, two days after his talks in Helsinki with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the White House announced Wednesday. It did not indicate the subject matter, but Bush is expected to discuss the Persian Gulf situation. White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said the congressional invitation was extended to Bush by House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
Wednesday on "The Daily Show," Jon Stewart offered up some unique fundraising tips to President Obama. Following on the news Wednesday that billionaire casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, who previously bankrolled Newt Gingrich's campaign to the tune of $30 million, had shelled out another $10 million to Mitt Romney's "super PAC," Stewart suggested it was time to think big and move away from the small-donation model that fueled his 2008...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1991
The City Council will meet with Planning Commission members in two joint study sessions this week. City officials will meet today at 3 p.m. to hear an update on the city budget and discuss final changes to a growth management plan that would make the city eligible for $1 million in Measure M sales tax revenue next year. To receive revenue from Measure M, the council must adopt a plan that demonstrates how Orange will meet future traffic circulation needs as the city grows.
NEWS
March 27, 2002 | From Associated Press
Lawmakers in India approved an anti-terrorism bill Tuesday after a day of heated debate in a highly unusual joint session of Parliament, only the third since the country's independence. The government said the legislation is crucial after the Sept. 11 attacks in the United States and a Dec. 13 attack on the Indian Parliament. "We cannot score a decisive victory against terrorism unless a special law of this kind is enacted," Home Affairs Minister Lal Krishna Advani said as he presented the bill.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Queen Elizabeth II, who made history Thursday by becoming the first British monarch to address a joint session of Congress, opened her remarks by poking fun at herself and ended with a sure-fire crowd pleaser: "May God Bless America." She received three standing ovations and was interrupted by applause several more times during a 15-minute speech.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greeted by tumultuous cheers from a crowded joint session of Congress, Solidarity leader Lech Walesa on Wednesday called on America to offer a new "Marshall Plan" to help rebuild the ailing economies of Eastern Europe. The Marshall Plan "helped Western Europe to protect its freedom and peaceful order" by supplying $11 billion to rebuild European economies after the end of World War II, Walesa recalled. "And now it is the moment when Eastern Europe awaits an investment of this kind."
NEWS
February 25, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore, responding to an invitation from Democrats that has prompted Republican suspicion, is scheduled to make what would be a rare appearance by a federal official to a joint session of the state Legislature next month. The invitation caught Republicans--including Gov. Pete Wilson--by surprise Monday. They were unaware that the address had even been scheduled by Senate President Pro Tem Bill Lockyer (D-Hayward). Even Democrats were uncertain what Gore might discuss.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, with spellbinding oratory that drew thunderous applause from a joint session of Congress, declared Wednesday that he and his people have destroyed the "idol of communism" and are determined to build a new Russia. But he warned that the "70-year nightmare" could return unless U.S. economic aid is forthcoming soon. "Today I am telling you what I tell my fellow countrymen: I will not go back on the reforms," Yeltsin said.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels will deliver the Republican response to President Obama's State of the Union address Tuesday, congressional Republicans have announced. Daniels is beginning the final year of his two-term governorship of a state Obama narrowly carried in the 2008 campaign. A former budget director to President George W. Bush, he has been a critic of Obama's fiscal stewardship of the nation. "Mitch Daniels is a fierce advocate for smaller, less costly and more accountable government, and has the record to prove it," House Speaker John Boehner said in a statement.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Is it time to panic at the White House? The whispers have begun to grow louder both inside and outside the Beltway that the answer is yes, and that President Obama's West Wing is in need of a good old-fashioned shakeup. The loudest voice to date is that of James Carville, the boisterous Democratic strategist who helped put Bill Clinton into the White House in 1992. Writing at CNN.com, Carville said the results of special elections this week in New York and Nevada call for an urgent response from the president to change course.
NEWS
September 6, 2011 | By Lisa Black, Chicago Tribune
Congressman Joe Walsh fielded some tough questions Tuesday morning from a high school government class in Mundelein, Ill. with students asking why he plans to boycott a jobs speech by President Barack Obama and how he's handling his ex-wife's lawsuit alleging he owes child support. The Tea Party -backed freshman from McHenry, Ill. told students in the advanced placement class that he plans to read the president's speech, scheduled Thursday night, but not attend the joint session of Congress.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Washington The broad outlines of the jobs plan that Obama intends to present to a joint session of Congress on Thursday are already known. On the networks' Sunday morning talk shows, Republicans dismissed those ideas out of hand, signaling more partisan brawling and less cooperation once the president's plan is formally presented. "I think what the president is going to talk about Thursday night is more of the same: extending unemployment benefits, payroll tax cuts, tax credits for hiring people," said Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.)
NATIONAL
September 1, 2011 | By Christi Parsons and Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
In a back-and-forth that raised familiar doubts about whether Democrats and Republicans can work together when Congress reconvenes next week, President Obama and House Speaker John A. Boehner tangled anew Wednesday. But the issue wasn't budgets or debt. It was a date. Obama asked to schedule a rare joint session of Congress for a prime-time address about jobs the Wednesday after Labor Day. In a rare, if not unprecedented, rebuff in modern times, Boehner (R-Ohio) rejected the president's request and recommended the following night.
NEWS
August 31, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
The White House acceded to House Speaker John A. Boehner's request that President Obama address a joint session of Congress next Thursday, ending a brief scheduling skirmish that presages a larger policy fight over boosting job creation. In a statement Wednesday evening, White House spokesman Jay Carney said Obama "is focused on the urgent need to create jobs and grow our economy, so he welcomes the opportunity to address a joint session of Congress" on Sept. 8. Obama initially requested to make the speech on Sept.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Washington The broad outlines of the jobs plan that Obama intends to present to a joint session of Congress on Thursday are already known. On the networks' Sunday morning talk shows, Republicans dismissed those ideas out of hand, signaling more partisan brawling and less cooperation once the president's plan is formally presented. "I think what the president is going to talk about Thursday night is more of the same: extending unemployment benefits, payroll tax cuts, tax credits for hiring people," said Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.)
WORLD
September 2, 2007 | Hector Tobar and Cecilia Sanchez, Times Staff Writers
For days before President Felipe Calderon's scheduled appearance Saturday at a joint session of Congress, opposing lawmakers argued over the stage directions of what used to be a routine bit of political theater. Would Calderon deliver the annual state of the nation report in writing, or would he make a speech? How many of the 13 steps of the dais would he be allowed to climb? Or would he be kept out of the chambers altogether?
NEWS
August 31, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
President Obama plans to unveil his new job-creation plan in a speech to a joint session of Congress on the evening of Sept. 7, the White House announced Wednesday. In a tweet, White House communications director Dan Pfeiffer first revealed that Obama had requested the rare speech to a joint session "to lay out his plan to create jobs, grow the economy and reduce the deficit. " "As I have traveled across our country this summer and spoken with our fellow Americans, I have heard a consistent message: Washington needs to put aside politics and start making decisions based on what is best for our country and not what is best for each of our parties in order to grow the economy and create jobs.
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