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Joint Task Force Six

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NEWS
June 20, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The joint Customs Service-military mission that last month unearthed an elaborate drug smugglers' tunnel under the U.S.-Mexican border was launched only after an urgent request for the action had been held up in the Pentagon bureaucracy for six weeks, The Times has learned.
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NEWS
June 20, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The joint Customs Service-military mission that last month unearthed an elaborate drug smugglers' tunnel under the U.S.-Mexican border was launched only after an urgent request for the action had been held up in the Pentagon bureaucracy for six weeks, The Times has learned.
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NATIONAL
January 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
Two military helicopters taking part in a nighttime anti-drug patrol crashed and burned in the dusty scrubland near the Mexican border, killing all four Marine reservists on board. The AH-1W Super Cobra helicopters went down Wednesday night amid the brush and cactus of Falcon State Park, about 110 miles northwest of Brownsville, officials said. Marine Corps spokesman Capt. Joe Kloppel said he had no immediate information on the cause of the crash.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The discovery of an elaborate 270-foot tunnel built under the Mexican border by drug traffickers to haul large quantities of cocaine to an Arizona warehouse was revealed Friday by federal officials. Flabbergasted Customs Service agents described the million-dollar passageway as "something out of a James Bond movie," replete with electric lighting, concrete reinforcement and a hydraulic system that raised a game-room floor in a Mexico hide-out to provide entry to the secret border crossing.
NEWS
April 2, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon, which entered the war on drugs with fanfare in 1989, is cutting spending and changing its role in fighting narcotics. The move comes partly because of recent sharp cuts in the military budget and partly because of a high-level Clinton Administration review that has changed the emphasis of federal drug enforcement efforts.
OPINION
November 23, 2003 | William M. Arkin, William M. Arkin is a military affairs analyst who writes regularly for Opinion. E-mail: warkin@igc.org.
Preoccupied with the war in Iraq and still traumatized by Sept. 11, 2001, the American public has paid little attention to some of what is being done inside the United States in the name of anti-terrorism. Under the banner of "homeland security," the military and intelligence communities are implementing far-reaching changes that blur the lines between terrorism and other kinds of crises and will break down long-established barriers to military action and surveillance within the U.S.
NEWS
August 16, 1998 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Smuggler Gulch once symbolized the struggle for control over the U.S.-Mexico border, a shrubby trough so often traversed by undocumented immigrants that erstwhile Republican presidential candidate Patrick J. Buchanan used it as the backdrop for his hard-line appeal for stricter border enforcement. A steel fence and more border agents mean few migrants now cross into the United States here.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two young soldiers, faces camouflaged, armed with M-16 assault rifles and .45-caliber pistols, lay in the desert sand 25 miles west of Yuma, Ariz., peering into Mexico. The darkness of a Southern California night made conditions perfect for their night-vision equipment. The National Guard soldiers from the Los Alamitos-based 40th Infantry Division were there to observe and listen, part of the military's silent war on drugs along the border. "Some nights there's no activity," one said.
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