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BUSINESS
January 30, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Silicon Valley's economy has revved up thanks to plucky Internet and alternative energy start-ups, according to a new report. Local technology companies created 33,000 jobs last year -- the first increase since 2001, a year after the dot-com downturn. The region's median household income jumped 6.5% from 2005 to 2006, to $76,300 -- the first uptick since 2001. It decreased 13% from 2001 to 2004.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1999 | Charles Piller
A widening gap between Silicon Valley's fast-growing demand for qualified employees and locally available high-tech workers costs companies up to $4 billion annually in recruitment costs and constrained growth, according to a report to be released today. About one-third of the employees needed annually are either hired from outside the area or the jobs go unfilled, according to the report by San Jose-based Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network, a policy research group.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Electronics Assn. today will release its annual report card on California's business climate for high-tech companies, and despite Silicon Valley's position as the industry's epicenter and the sector's high profits and rapid growth, most of the grades are poor. Among six categories evaluated by the national trade group, only one--the environment for electronic commerce--received an A grade. The two most problematic areas will surprise few.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of California's key engines of economic growth--Silicon Valley--is in danger of stalling because of a severe shortage of affordable housing and a widening income and education gap between rich and poor, whites and minorities, according to a report to be released Sunday. "These issues are on the minds of virtually everyone. They really see a threat," said Doug Henton, research director of the report, produced for the nonprofit Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1997 | MANUEL PASTOR Jr., Manuel Pastor Jr. is chair of Latin American and Latino Studies at the UC Santa Cruz and a research fellow at the International & Public Affairs Center at Occidental College in Los Angeles
At opposite ends of California, regional leaders recently provided equally opposing snapshots of their self-organization and their future. In San Jose, Joint Venture Silicon Valley Network, which is a 5-year-old consortium of business and government leaders from 23 cities and four counties, released a report detailing Silicon Valley's accomplishments and challenges. The most immediate problems noted were clogged transportation networks and increasing house prices.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1996 | GEORGE VRADENBURG and GEORGE MIHLSTEN, GEORGE VRADENBURG and GEORGE MIHLSTEN are partners with the law firm of Latham & Watkins. Latham & Watkins is counsel for DreamWorks SKG
Much celebration has accompanied DreamWorks' decision to build its movie studio at Playa Vista. Rightly so, DreamWorks promises a state-of-the-art digital studio, employing over a thousand high-paid, well-trained Angelenos. And an innovative DreamWorks will provide a competitive spur to the dense cluster of world-class entertainment firms in Southern California.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2000 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silicon Valley's surging job growth has slowed substantially in the last year, suggesting that the area's unstoppable surge in home prices and transit problems may have finally reduced its desirability for some businesses. Yet authors of a report released today say that this respite in the explosive rate of new jobs may give the area a chance to catch up with the last decade's rapid surge in high-tech industries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2002 | KAREN ALEXANDER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
PALO ALTO--High school senior Max Butin watched the technology bubble burst from his after-school job at a pizza parlor in Silicon Valley. Suddenly, he noticed, nobody was ordering toppings. Then his mother, a recruiter for high-tech companies, found herself out of work, and the sputtering economy hit home. But Butin, 18, said that the whirlwind cycle of boom and bust that marked his teenage years has not deterred him from wanting to be an automotive design engineer. He gathered on a recent afternoon with other committed technology students in the robotics lab of Palo Alto Senior High School, where they meet after class to build robots for a national competition in Florida.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER
Silicon Valley's techno-riche looked awfully petty when the local United Way was recently reduced to begging to make up an $11-million shortfall in funding for the area's underprivileged. The valley, despite a few famously modest twentysomething tycoons who share apartments and wear sneakers to work, is fast becoming an orgy of conspicuous consumption. So the hand wringing over geek greed in the local media seemed justified.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
What would you do if you became a multimillionaire? In Silicon Valley, the answer is often surprising: Get back to work. Gautam Godhwani faced that decision at the age of 24. Only a few years out of UC Berkeley, he helped start an Internet company called AtWeb from his parents' basement, and Netscape snapped it up in 1998 for $93 million. He celebrated by buying a Porsche 911 and a San Francisco apartment with three bedrooms and a view of the Golden Gate Bridge.
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