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Jon Corzine

NATIONAL
May 31, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Jon S. Corzine returned to the statehouse in Trenton for the first time since an April car crash nearly killed him. Corzine broke his left leg, 11 ribs, collarbone and sternum when his speeding sport utility vehicle, driven by a state trooper, slammed into a guard rail.
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NATIONAL
September 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Gov. Jon S. Corzine successfully underwent surgery to remove excess bone growth in the leg he broke in a near-fatal car crash last spring. He transferred gubernatorial power to Senate President Richard J. Codey five minutes before he was sedated for surgery, a spokeswoman said.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Jon Corzine will resume work Monday for the first time since being critically injured in a car crash last month, a spokesman said. Corzine was released from a hospital Monday and has been rehabilitating at the governor's mansion in Princeton, where he's expected to work until he has recovered enough to return to the statehouse, spokesman Anthony Coley said. Corzine broke his left leg, 11 ribs, a collarbone and his sternum in the April 12 crash on the Garden State Parkway.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Jon Corzine was sworn in as New Jersey's 54th governor, promising ethics reform and an end to "fiscal gimmicks" that have papered over the state's financial problems. The former Goldman Sachs executive and Democratic U.S. senator took the oath of office in Trenton. His swearing-in ended a tumultuous period that began in 2004 when Gov. James E. McGreevey resigned after acknowledging a gay affair. State Senate President Richard J. Codey had been acting governor since then.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Surgery on Gov. Jon Corzine's injured leg was successful, and state police said the driver blamed for the wreck that critically injured the governor told them he didn't stop because he hadn't realized he was involved. The 20-year-old driver, whom police found at an Atlantic City casino where he works, won't be charged with leaving the scene of Thursday's accident, State Police Capt. Albert Della Fave said. Corzine's recovery was progressing better than doctors expected, said Dr. Steven E.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Jon S. Corzine was seriously injured when his vehicle was in an accident on the Garden State Parkway, authorities said. Corzine was listed in critical but stable condition at Cooper University Hospital in Camden, officials said. His injuries were not considered life-threatening. Dr. Steven Ross said that Corzine was expected to be in surgery until early today. Corzine had a broken sternum, a broken collarbone, fractured vertebrae, a broken leg and six broken ribs on each side, Ross said.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Jon S. Corzine has voluntarily paid a $46 fine for violating state law by not having a seat belt on during a car crash that left him seriously injured, his spokesman said. Corzine met with State Police Supt. Col. Rick Fuentes, Atty. Gen. Stuart Rabner and two state police investigators at the governor's mansion in Princeton to discuss the accident, spokesman Anthony Coley said. As the meeting ended, Corzine asked Fuentes for a ticket, Coley said.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Legislators opposed to Gov. Jon Corzine's proposal to raise the state sales tax rejected a compromise sought by the governor Tuesday and began devising their own budget plan, which might involve an income tax increase. Corzine ordered lawmakers in to work on the Fourth of July holiday, imploring them to end a budget standoff that has shut down many government services. Atlantic City casinos fought to keep from being dragged into the dispute.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Jon Corzine resumed his duties as governor Monday, nearly a month after a high-speed crash on the Garden State Parkway almost killed him. The Democrat can walk again, but only slowly and with special crutches, and he plans to work from the governor's mansion at first rather than trying to return to the Statehouse.
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