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Jon E Keeley

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1992 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plant ecologist hired by Ahmanson Land Co. has become a sharp critic of the firm's plans for a huge residential and golf course development in eastern Ventura County, saying the project would destroy a prime remnant of the state's vanishing grassland prairies. Jon E.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1992 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plant ecologist hired by Ahmanson Land Co. has become a sharp critic of the firm's plans for a huge residential and golf course development in eastern Ventura County, saying the project would destroy a prime remnant of the state's vanishing grassland prairies. Jon E.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1989
Disappearing Plants--Endangered individual species often get more attention, but the fact is that entire plant communities are disappearing all over Southern California. Differing climactic and geographic zones create a number of distinct plant communities in Orange County and elsewhere; each community is typified by one or more dominant plant species and each supports a distinct array of animal life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1994 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To seed or not to seed. That was the question. Ecologists, biologists and public policy-makers gathered Saturday for the Southern California Academy of Sciences annual meeting at UC Irvine to discuss October's wildfires and whether vegetation should be replanted in burn areas to hold off mudslides.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2004 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
The raging Western wildfires of recent years have often been blamed on management practices that promoted dense, overpacked forests. But a new study indicates global warming may be the main culprit. Challenging the conventional wisdom that today's severe wildfires are unnatural and unprecedented, researchers have found that parts of the West experienced destructive blazes during a warm, drought-plagued period in the Middle Ages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2007 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
Several scientists are cautioning Los Angeles officials to think hard before reseeding and replanting large areas of Griffith Park that burned in last week's 820-acre brush fire. Reseeding can be expensive and potentially useless, said the scientists, who specialize in restoring open land in Southern California after major wildfires. It can also introduce grasses and other plants that normally do not grow in the region, crowding out natural vegetation, they said.
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