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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2003 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
A Camarillo man fatally shot by Ventura County deputies after he barricaded himself in his home was believed to be mentally ill, a sheriff's spokesman said Wednesday. Jon Edward Hill, 46, of Camarillo, was originally identified by one of his aliases, John Elijah Rocks, but a check of his birth certificate and fingerprints revealed his legal name, said sheriff's Sgt. Harold Hanley. Hill died of a gunshot wound to his chest, said Deputy Coroner James Baroni.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2003 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
A Camarillo man fatally shot by Ventura County deputies after he barricaded himself in his home was believed to be mentally ill, a sheriff's spokesman said Wednesday. Jon Edward Hill, 46, of Camarillo, was originally identified by one of his aliases, John Elijah Rocks, but a check of his birth certificate and fingerprints revealed his legal name, said sheriff's Sgt. Harold Hanley. Hill died of a gunshot wound to his chest, said Deputy Coroner James Baroni.
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MAGAZINE
May 16, 1999 | ED LEIBOWITZ, Ed Leibowitz last wrote for the magazine about Rodney King
Villa Verona, a unique experimental home at the Pacific Design Center, has many comfortingly nostalgic touches: a bust of a Greek philosopher, framed photographs of Bing Crosby and Harold Lloyd, terra-cotta floors, a four-poster bed beside an ersatz hearth. But all these retro trappings belie what lurks behind the walls: 2,000 feet of cable, telephone, coaxial and fiber-optic lines four strands thick that connect a computerized system capable of detecting a 5 a.m.
MAGAZINE
May 16, 1999 | ED LEIBOWITZ, Ed Leibowitz last wrote for the magazine about Rodney King
Villa Verona, a unique experimental home at the Pacific Design Center, has many comfortingly nostalgic touches: a bust of a Greek philosopher, framed photographs of Bing Crosby and Harold Lloyd, terra-cotta floors, a four-poster bed beside an ersatz hearth. But all these retro trappings belie what lurks behind the walls: 2,000 feet of cable, telephone, coaxial and fiber-optic lines four strands thick that connect a computerized system capable of detecting a 5 a.m.
SPORTS
April 6, 1991 | BOB OATES
Bruce McNall, who owns the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League, and Raghib (Rocket) Ismail, the Notre Dame football and track star, are already on the same page financially, McNall indicated after his first meeting Friday with Ismail's attorney, Jon Edwards. "They know we can work out the economics," said McNall, who also owns the Kings. "The question is whether (Ismail) likes Canada, and we've invited him to spend a few days in Toronto to meet the coaches and look over the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1989 | JEFF MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
Investigators were combing a crash site in South Korea, trying to determine why a Tustin-based transport helicopter went out of control and crashed during a training exercise, a Marine Corps spokesman said Saturday. The pilot and three crewmen, who were attached to the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing based in Tustin, died. The copter crashed in a rice field 280 miles southeast of Tokyo while on a joint U.S.-South Korean training mission known as Team Spirit '89.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1989 | From Times News Services
A Poway Marine was among four killed Friday when a helicopter crashed in a Korean rice paddy during joint exercises with South Korean forces, the U. S. military in Seoul said. The CH-46 Sea Knight went down near Toksok-ri, close to the east coast port of Pohang, while taking part in annual Team Spirit exercises, a U. S. military statement said. No one was reported injured on the ground. The statement said the cause of the crash was unknown.
SPORTS
January 6, 1994 | From Associated Press
Jeff Alm of the Houston Oilers was legally drunk, the effects enhanced by a prescription barbiturate, when he committed suicide after a car crash that killed his best friend. Alm's blood-alcohol level was .14, above the .10 legal limit for Texas drivers, Joseph Jachimczyk, Harris County's chief medical examiner, said Wednesday. Jachimczyk added that the drug Fiorinal, a commonly prescribed muscle relaxant, was found in Alm's blood.
SPORTS
February 13, 1998 | From Associated Press
The medal drought is over for the U.S. luge team. After 34 years of Olympic failure, the doubles teams of Gordy Sheer and Chris Thorpe, and Mark Grimmette and Brian Martin, each won medals Friday. Thorpe and Sheer got silver, and Grimmette and Martin took bronze behind the winning duo of Stefan Krausse and Jan Behrendt of Germany. The winners finished the two runs in 1 minute, 41.105 seconds for the gold. Thorpe and Sheer, who had faltered all during the World Cup season, had a time of 1:41.127.
SPORTS
April 21, 1991 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raghib (Rocket) Ismail, the Notre Dame football star, gave a new meaning to the term blockbuster contract Saturday night when he signed to play the next four seasons for the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League for $6.5 million a year. "It isn't all guaranteed," said his lawyer, Jon Edwards of San Francisco. "Only $4.5 million a year is guaranteed--for all four years."
SPORTS
May 8, 2005 | Steve Henson, Times Staff Writer
Most people have an idol. Milton Bradley's just happens to be the guy running from center field to the dugout when he is running out to the position this weekend. So Bradley found the courage to ask Ken Griffey Jr. to sign the back of a Dodger jersey for him. "He was an inspiration to me," Bradley said. "I always loved watching him play." Bradley, a switch-hitter who throws right-handed, said he learned to bat left-handed by emulating Griffey's smooth stroke.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1996 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Man Ray once referred to California as a "beautiful prison," and indeed the decade he spent in Los Angeles--the subject of a fine exhibition co-organized by Track 16 and Robert Berman Gallery--was a strange one. It was marked on the one hand by anxiety (Man Ray spent much of the early 1940s repainting the masterpieces he left behind as he fled war-ravaged Paris). On the other, it was marked by a grudging acceptance of his self-willed anonymity in this, the land of show biz (the catalog Man Ray designed for his last show here, in 1948 at the William Copley Gallery, was titled "To Be Continued Unnoticed")
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