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Jon Faddis

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
No, that wasn't a thunder storm that blew through town Monday. It was the phenomenal trumpeter Jon Faddis, who during his single night at Catalina's strained the bounds of believability, but never his chops. Long admired as a protege of Dizzy Gillespie, with whom he still plays now and then, Faddis brought his own quartet from New York to play music from his current Epic album, "Into the Faddisphere."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2014 | By Chris Barton
There are few surer bets in the concert industry than an anniversary celebration. Seen across the musical spectrum, including recent tours commemorating Miles Davis' "Kind of Blue" as well as this year's star-studded televised salute to the Beatles, such tributes reliably serve two constituencies in showing young listeners the value of history while allowing longtime fans to savor a bit of nostalgia. At a crowded Walt Disney Concert Hall on Saturday night, the Los Angeles Philharmonic offered a doubleheader of such tributes with "60+60," a concert featuring two ensembles that honored the 60th anniversaries of the Newport Jazz Festival and the landmark live recording "Jazz at Massey Hall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
While nobody is likely to relate to the entire album, this is an effective reminder of the trumpeter's Dizzy Gillespie-inspired virtuosity. Diversity reigns. Faddis stretches the sonic limits on a supercharged "High Five," pays homage to Miles Davis on "Dewey's Dance," raps, albeit trivially, with Gillespie on "Rapartee" and displays his admirable ballad horn in "Forevermore." Shuttling his selections between straight-ahead and funk, Faddis is clearly aiming at providing something for everyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2004 | From the Chicago Tribune
The Chicago Jazz Ensemble -- one of the nation's leading jazz repertory bands -- is expected to engage trumpeter and bandleader Jon Faddis as its artistic director, replacing the ensemble's late founder, William Russo. Faddis, an internationally noted soloist and former conductor of the now-defunct Carnegie Hall Jazz Band (which he led from 1991 to 2002), is expected to assume the post after contracts have been signed, possibly in the next week or two.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2004 | From the Chicago Tribune
The Chicago Jazz Ensemble -- one of the nation's leading jazz repertory bands -- is expected to engage trumpeter and bandleader Jon Faddis as its artistic director, replacing the ensemble's late founder, William Russo. Faddis, an internationally noted soloist and former conductor of the now-defunct Carnegie Hall Jazz Band (which he led from 1991 to 2002), is expected to assume the post after contracts have been signed, possibly in the next week or two.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2000
It was uncharacteristically uncool of Don Heckman to flash the race card in his too-brief coverage of "LA Jazz 2000" ("USC Showcases Area Stalwarts," April 15). In the three years that I've attended, the complexion of the artists has been of no consequence to the audience, a diverse group that only cares about good jazz. Not that it should matter, but if Heckman is keeping a tally, the 1998 headliners were Wallace Roney, Kenny Garrett, the B-Sharp Jazz Quartet and Jon Faddis. In 1999 they included Kamau Daaood and McCoy Tyner.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
At best, things were a bit difficult to figure out Friday evening at the Wiltern Theater as "Jazzvisions," a jazz video series by Jack Lewis and Lorimar-Telepictures, concluded taping with a program promising the "Jazz Souls" of George Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess" and the Roaring '20s as conceived by arranger Bill Potts. Featuring a 21-man all-star band conducted by composer Johnny Mandel, the program provided plenty of "Porgy and Bess" and nothing of the Roaring '20s.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
In one of the jazz festival's less conventional ventures, George Shearing plunged through a time warp Monday at Town Hall to play in settings that recalled his formative years in England and his early days in New York. Leading a 1930s Dixieland group and a 1940s bop combo, he was also heard in a set of piano duets with Hank Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2014 | By Chris Barton
There are few surer bets in the concert industry than an anniversary celebration. Seen across the musical spectrum, including recent tours commemorating Miles Davis' "Kind of Blue" as well as this year's star-studded televised salute to the Beatles, such tributes reliably serve two constituencies in showing young listeners the value of history while allowing longtime fans to savor a bit of nostalgia. At a crowded Walt Disney Concert Hall on Saturday night, the Los Angeles Philharmonic offered a doubleheader of such tributes with "60+60," a concert featuring two ensembles that honored the 60th anniversaries of the Newport Jazz Festival and the landmark live recording "Jazz at Massey Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
The subject was jazz; the occasion, the 13th annual National Assn. of Jazz Educators convention, in progress through Sunday at the Anaheim Marriott Hotel, where some 2,000 educators, students and performing artists have gathered to help determine the future of the music. "A minority music such as jazz," said Herb Wong, the association president, "is still not given its rightful due. This slice of American tradition is worthy of support."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2000
It was uncharacteristically uncool of Don Heckman to flash the race card in his too-brief coverage of "LA Jazz 2000" ("USC Showcases Area Stalwarts," April 15). In the three years that I've attended, the complexion of the artists has been of no consequence to the audience, a diverse group that only cares about good jazz. Not that it should matter, but if Heckman is keeping a tally, the 1998 headliners were Wallace Roney, Kenny Garrett, the B-Sharp Jazz Quartet and Jon Faddis. In 1999 they included Kamau Daaood and McCoy Tyner.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
While nobody is likely to relate to the entire album, this is an effective reminder of the trumpeter's Dizzy Gillespie-inspired virtuosity. Diversity reigns. Faddis stretches the sonic limits on a supercharged "High Five," pays homage to Miles Davis on "Dewey's Dance," raps, albeit trivially, with Gillespie on "Rapartee" and displays his admirable ballad horn in "Forevermore." Shuttling his selections between straight-ahead and funk, Faddis is clearly aiming at providing something for everyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
No, that wasn't a thunder storm that blew through town Monday. It was the phenomenal trumpeter Jon Faddis, who during his single night at Catalina's strained the bounds of believability, but never his chops. Long admired as a protege of Dizzy Gillespie, with whom he still plays now and then, Faddis brought his own quartet from New York to play music from his current Epic album, "Into the Faddisphere."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
In one of the jazz festival's less conventional ventures, George Shearing plunged through a time warp Monday at Town Hall to play in settings that recalled his formative years in England and his early days in New York. Leading a 1930s Dixieland group and a 1940s bop combo, he was also heard in a set of piano duets with Hank Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
At best, things were a bit difficult to figure out Friday evening at the Wiltern Theater as "Jazzvisions," a jazz video series by Jack Lewis and Lorimar-Telepictures, concluded taping with a program promising the "Jazz Souls" of George Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess" and the Roaring '20s as conceived by arranger Bill Potts. Featuring a 21-man all-star band conducted by composer Johnny Mandel, the program provided plenty of "Porgy and Bess" and nothing of the Roaring '20s.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
The subject was jazz; the occasion, the 13th annual National Assn. of Jazz Educators convention, in progress through Sunday at the Anaheim Marriott Hotel, where some 2,000 educators, students and performing artists have gathered to help determine the future of the music. "A minority music such as jazz," said Herb Wong, the association president, "is still not given its rightful due. This slice of American tradition is worthy of support."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Horne's JVC Debut: Lena Horne, 75, hasn't been performing much in recent years, but she will take to the stage this June at New York's JVC Jazz Festival to sing the songs of Billy Strayhorn, who was a close friend.
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