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February 12, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Words such as "iconic," "renowned" and "legendary" are bandied about far too easily these days. But on Thursday at the Jazz Bakery, each of those hyperbolic adjectives was applicable to the performance by the -- yes -- iconic, renowned and legendary singer-lyricist Jon Hendricks. His performance, with a four-piece band, offered an affirmation that, at 84, he still has plenty of energy, desire and creative capability.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Andrew Gilbert, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With the poise of a World War II-era crooner, the patois of a Beat poet and the searching gaze of seminary student, jazz vocalist Kurt Elling isn't likely to be confused for Mick Jagger any time soon. But for Don Was, who produced "The Gate," Elling's new album exploring contemporary rock and pop tunes, watching the singer work with longtime pianist and creative foil Laurence Hobgood reminded him of the capaciously creative collaboration of Jagger and Keith Richards. While "The Gate" doesn't include any tunes by the Stones, Elling's eighth album features an intriguing mix of songs by equally unlikely sources such as King Crimson, Earth, Wind & Fire and Joe Jackson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Recorded during four nights in 1993 at New York's Blue Note club, this live performance finds singer Jon Hendricks upstaged by his own band, a group of all-stars that includes saxophonists Red Holloway and Benny Golson, trombonist Al Grey and trumpeters Wynton Marsalis and Lew Soloff. While Hendricks' sense of inventiveness has lost little since his heyday with Lambert, Hendricks and Ross, his voice has suffered the years, here sounding a bit on the sour side when compared to his earlier work.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
His names have been as varied as his career. Call him by his birth name, Zaxariades, or by the more truncated title on his new CD, "Mr. Z." Or call him Bruce Scott, the appellation he used during a lengthy acting career including a role in "Jesus Christ Superstar" and an appearance in the cult "Flesh Gordon" movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1990 | Leonard Feather
JON HENDRICKS "Freddie Freeloader" Denon Guest artists abound on this session. George Benson is in splendid virtuosic form, singing Hendricks' words to what was originally a Cannonball Adderley sax solo on the title cut, from Miles Davis' classic "Kind of Blue" date. On the same track, Bobby McFerrin sings the Wynton Kelly piano solo, Al Jarreau handles lyrics to Miles' solo and Hendricks himself tackles the John Coltrane passage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jon Hendricks didn't invent the idea of writing lyrics to improvised jazz melodies, usually described as vocalese. But--with Dave Lambert and Annie Ross in the classic jazz vocal trio Lambert, Hendricks & Ross--he developed the technique into a format that was imaginative, innovative and commercially successful. Hendricks has had a long, equally creative career beyond the breakup of the group in 1964 (actually Lambert, Hendricks & Bavan at the time, since Ross left in 1962).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a few brief years in the late '50s and early '60s, Lambert, Hendricks & Ross was the hottest group in jazz. In fact, a 1962 Columbia album underscored that fact with practically the same title: "The Hottest New Group in Jazz." But Annie Ross left the trio in 1962, and the reconstituted ensemble, with singer Yolande Bavan, broke up two years later. Dave Lambert's death in an auto accident in 1966 appeared to be the final chapter in the vocal group's shooting star career.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
The name of Jon Hendricks has been associated so long with vocal groups of various sizes and shapes that it comes as a surprise to find him, at St. Mark's in Venice (where he opened Wednesday and closes Saturday), doing much of the show as a solo singer. That he is able to pull it off, sans quartet, attests to the power of his personality.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
"Jon Hendricks: The Freddie Sessions," airing tonight on Channel 28 at 11:50, is one of those rare documentaries that can be characterized as musical, entertaining and educational. Produced and directed by Jeffe Feuerzeig, a 26-year old independent filmmaker, the 29-minute show is based primarily on the title cut of "Freddie Freeloader," Hendricks' recent CD on Denon Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Andrew Gilbert, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With the poise of a World War II-era crooner, the patois of a Beat poet and the searching gaze of seminary student, jazz vocalist Kurt Elling isn't likely to be confused for Mick Jagger any time soon. But for Don Was, who produced "The Gate," Elling's new album exploring contemporary rock and pop tunes, watching the singer work with longtime pianist and creative foil Laurence Hobgood reminded him of the capaciously creative collaboration of Jagger and Keith Richards. While "The Gate" doesn't include any tunes by the Stones, Elling's eighth album features an intriguing mix of songs by equally unlikely sources such as King Crimson, Earth, Wind & Fire and Joe Jackson.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Words such as "iconic," "renowned" and "legendary" are bandied about far too easily these days. But on Thursday at the Jazz Bakery, each of those hyperbolic adjectives was applicable to the performance by the -- yes -- iconic, renowned and legendary singer-lyricist Jon Hendricks. His performance, with a four-piece band, offered an affirmation that, at 84, he still has plenty of energy, desire and creative capability.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a few brief years in the late '50s and early '60s, Lambert, Hendricks & Ross was the hottest group in jazz. In fact, a 1962 Columbia album underscored that fact with practically the same title: "The Hottest New Group in Jazz." But Annie Ross left the trio in 1962, and the reconstituted ensemble, with singer Yolande Bavan, broke up two years later. Dave Lambert's death in an auto accident in 1966 appeared to be the final chapter in the vocal group's shooting star career.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1999 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Annie Ross and Jon Hendricks are trying to remember exactly how this reunion came about after, oh, 36 years. "Let's see," she begins, "it was a phone call from a very bright, enterprising young gentleman." "My manager," he says. "In October." "Right. He said, 'How do you feel about reuniting?' And I said, 'Great.' And then what happened? We had lunch?" "No," he corrects. "I came up to Birdland, where you were performing." "That's right. You came up and sang." "We did one number.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jon Hendricks didn't invent the idea of writing lyrics to improvised jazz melodies, usually described as vocalese. But--with Dave Lambert and Annie Ross in the classic jazz vocal trio Lambert, Hendricks & Ross--he developed the technique into a format that was imaginative, innovative and commercially successful. Hendricks has had a long, equally creative career beyond the breakup of the group in 1964 (actually Lambert, Hendricks & Bavan at the time, since Ross left in 1962).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Recorded during four nights in 1993 at New York's Blue Note club, this live performance finds singer Jon Hendricks upstaged by his own band, a group of all-stars that includes saxophonists Red Holloway and Benny Golson, trombonist Al Grey and trumpeters Wynton Marsalis and Lew Soloff. While Hendricks' sense of inventiveness has lost little since his heyday with Lambert, Hendricks and Ross, his voice has suffered the years, here sounding a bit on the sour side when compared to his earlier work.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1991
Of all the absurd arguments advanced in this whole Middle East debate, the most absurd is that "we must rally behind the President" because he is our leader. If he is wrong, he is wrong. And if he is wrong, there is no ethical imperative that we rally behind him. Rather, if we believe he is wrong, it is our moral duty to oppose him. LARRY LEVINE Van Nuys
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1999 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Annie Ross and Jon Hendricks are trying to remember exactly how this reunion came about after, oh, 36 years. "Let's see," she begins, "it was a phone call from a very bright, enterprising young gentleman." "My manager," he says. "In October." "Right. He said, 'How do you feel about reuniting?' And I said, 'Great.' And then what happened? We had lunch?" "No," he corrects. "I came up to Birdland, where you were performing." "That's right. You came up and sang." "We did one number.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1991
Of all the absurd arguments advanced in this whole Middle East debate, the most absurd is that "we must rally behind the President" because he is our leader. If he is wrong, he is wrong. And if he is wrong, there is no ethical imperative that we rally behind him. Rather, if we believe he is wrong, it is our moral duty to oppose him. LARRY LEVINE Van Nuys
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
"Jon Hendricks: The Freddie Sessions," airing tonight on Channel 28 at 11:50, is one of those rare documentaries that can be characterized as musical, entertaining and educational. Produced and directed by Jeffe Feuerzeig, a 26-year old independent filmmaker, the 29-minute show is based primarily on the title cut of "Freddie Freeloader," Hendricks' recent CD on Denon Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1990 | Leonard Feather
JON HENDRICKS "Freddie Freeloader" Denon Guest artists abound on this session. George Benson is in splendid virtuosic form, singing Hendricks' words to what was originally a Cannonball Adderley sax solo on the title cut, from Miles Davis' classic "Kind of Blue" date. On the same track, Bobby McFerrin sings the Wynton Kelly piano solo, Al Jarreau handles lyrics to Miles' solo and Hendricks himself tackles the John Coltrane passage.
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