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October 1, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Music, despite the best efforts of writers to pigeonhole its various styles, knows no borders. And no form of music has crossed more cultural and stylistic borders than jazz. That's the lesson behind the Multicultural Arts Council of Orange County's "Journeys in Jazz: An Ethnic Jazz Series," to be held on three evenings in October at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Music, despite the best efforts of writers to pigeonhole its various styles, knows no borders. And no form of music has crossed more cultural and stylistic borders than jazz. That's the lesson behind the Multicultural Arts Council of Orange County's "Journeys in Jazz: An Ethnic Jazz Series," to be held on three evenings in October at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2002
In response to the issue of the Beastie Boys' use of sampling the musical sound from composer-flutist James Newton's recorded composition "Choir" ("A Musician Writes It, a Rapper Borrows It; A Swap or a Threat?" by Geoff Boucher, Sept. 21), Beastie Boys member Adam Yauch misses the point when he states, "What we used is three notes and three notes do not constitute a composition." It is not the three notes that they used, it is the unmistakable sound of those three notes of James Newton in both his performance and composition.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1994 | DON SNOWDEN
JON JANG & THE PAN-ASIAN ARKESTRA "Tiananmen!" Soul Note * * * 1/2 Jang's first Soul Note album was disjointed but there's no trace of that problem on "Tiananmen!" The Bay Area pianist's ensemble--augmented by guest James Newton (flute)--evokes a myriad of moods by deftly blending jazz and Asian music elements and instrumentation, fiery improvisation, and provocative ensemble packages and arrangements.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Though the era when big bands thrived has long since passed, many artists still find the large ensemble a challenging arena. There they can explore the possibilities of color and texture to be found within the jazz language. Leading off this batch of new releases are dynamic albums by two such artists: Joe Roccisano, the former L.A. reedman-composer who now lives in New York, and Jon Jang.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1994 | JOSEF WOODARD
In the last month, area concertgoers have been treated to an unofficial survey of noted jazz adventurers who have found gainful employment in Southern California academia. We've heard from trumpeter Leo Smith, now at CalArts, and trombonist George Lewis, now at UC San Diego. At Monday night's Green Umbrella concert at the Japan America Theatre, the guest of honor was flutist-composer and UC Irvine faculty member James Newton. The concert's second half was devoted to the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The attention given Wynton Marsalis' Pulitzer Prize-winning oratorio "Blood on the Fields" reminds us that there are other, less visible musicians who work in both jazz and classical traditions. One of the busier members of that group is L.A.-based flutist James Newton. Newton, a professor of music at UC Irvine, doesn't stay idle during his summer breaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1993 | DON SNOWDEN, Don Snowden is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Musicians hate to be labeled and the practice can have serious repercussions in jazz. Certain tags are virtual stigmas that can limit the potential audience and chances to record or perform. The term avant-garde is a prime example. The label was initially attached to artists whose music stretched beyond the boundaries of post-be-bop in the early '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
San Francisco is rapidly becoming the home of the offbeat music collective. With such multi-stylistic groups as the Hieroglyphic Ensemble and the Pan Asian Arkestra turning up with increasing regularity, the Bay Area can take credit for generating some of the most fascinating new sounds of the last few years. Thursday night's appearance by San Francisco composer-pianist Jon Jang and the 11-piece Pan Asian Arkestra at the Irvine Barclay Theatre was a case in point.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her delightfully wry "My America . . . Or Honk If You Love Buddha," noted documentarian Renee Tajima-Pena attempts to answer this question, in regard to Asian Americans: "Will we truly ever belong in America?" Tajima-Pena's answer is yes, but not before she delves deeply into her own family history as the Chicago-born daughter of Japanese Americans--whom she considered carbons of Ozzie and Harriet--and into the lives of various others, most notably, well-known character actor Victor Wong.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Many writers have spent chunks of their childhoods in bed, confined for illness. For Flaubert or Robert Louis Stevenson, a mandated bed-stay helped facilitate the changeover from observed child to adult observer. The young Maxine Hong Kingston spent one year in bed. In her autobiographical writings this happens after an incident in which she tortured a maddeningly passive school chum, a first-generation Chinese American girl like herself.
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