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Jon Jerde

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OPINION
December 20, 1998 | Allison Silver
In the continuing public debate about urban design, there is much discombobulation: Are real cities growing or fading? Do suburbs and "edge cities" represent the savior of civilization or its nadir? Is the theme-park city, all spectacle and shine, necessarily more enticing than the grit and danger of an authentic urban fabric? As he has so often before, architect Jon A. Jerde encompasses both the oldest and the newest of theories, usually in the same sentence.
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OPINION
December 20, 2006
Re "City lite," Current, Dec. 10 As master planner and architect for Universal CityWalk, the Jerde Partnership was thrilled to see it cited as an example of a center that has become an important part of the public's everyday life. This was our intention from the beginning. For nearly 30 years, we've tried to be a leader in creating places that integrate into the urban fabric and bring together people to shop, socialize and spend time. This wasn't by accident; it resulted from our founding philosophy that blends community-based planning principles with superior design -- a viewpoint that Southern Californians embrace.
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NEWS
January 20, 1988 | LEON WHITESON
When Jon Jerde first visited Europe in his early 20s, fresh from the USC School of Architecture, he was truly amazed by the urban civilization he encountered. "Europe was a revelation to a green young Angeleno," Jerde recalled. "Long periods of trial and error, of tuning and refining have gone into the creation of great cities like Paris, London, Rome or Amsterdam. But I realized that in America we really didn't have the time to go through such a slow city growth.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2000
I was amused to read the April 24 Counterpunch response ("The Real Mastermind Behind CityWalk") by Jim Nelson to my "CityWalk Talk" letter of April 16. First of all, let me state that I bear no malice toward Jon Jerde. I was delighted by the Westside Pavilion when it opened; I enjoy his M.C. Escher-esque Horton Plaza (unless I have to get somewhere quickly) design and think his execution of CityWalk is pretty entertaining. We even appropriated some of his people when I was the senior concept designer for Sega GameWorks (I invite you to ask them about the origin of the CityWalk concept)
NEWS
July 5, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yoshiko Hirayama has been freed from her "life as a mole." She couldn't be happier. After years of toiling in crowded department stores brightened only by artificial light, "I can smile naturally, can enjoy myself, and that is passed on to the customers," said the manager of the Cue'ss International Network boutique. Her new home opens out into the heart of Canal City Hakata, a $1.
REAL ESTATE
July 10, 1988
The Los Angeles-based Jerde Partnership architectural firm, which gained world-wide recognition for its work on the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and its design of San Diego's Horton Plaza, has been chosen to revitalize two districts on the island of Kyushu in Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2000
I'd really like to set the record straight once and for all as to who actually created the visual design style for CityWalk ("Fantasies of a City High on a Hill," by Nicolai Ouroussoff, April 9). As stated in your article, Jon Jerde was hired in 1985 by the Walt Disney Co. I was hired for two years as a full-time creative design consultant by Walt Disney Imagineering (WDI) beginning in 1987. Teamed with writers Jim Steinmeyer and Tony Morando, my first major project for WDI was Disney Island, a themed retail/restaurants/entertainment center for Walt Disney World.
OPINION
December 20, 2006
Re "City lite," Current, Dec. 10 As master planner and architect for Universal CityWalk, the Jerde Partnership was thrilled to see it cited as an example of a center that has become an important part of the public's everyday life. This was our intention from the beginning. For nearly 30 years, we've tried to be a leader in creating places that integrate into the urban fabric and bring together people to shop, socialize and spend time. This wasn't by accident; it resulted from our founding philosophy that blends community-based planning principles with superior design -- a viewpoint that Southern Californians embrace.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2000
I was amused to read the April 24 Counterpunch response ("The Real Mastermind Behind CityWalk") by Jim Nelson to my "CityWalk Talk" letter of April 16. First of all, let me state that I bear no malice toward Jon Jerde. I was delighted by the Westside Pavilion when it opened; I enjoy his M.C. Escher-esque Horton Plaza (unless I have to get somewhere quickly) design and think his execution of CityWalk is pretty entertaining. We even appropriated some of his people when I was the senior concept designer for Sega GameWorks (I invite you to ask them about the origin of the CityWalk concept)
NEWS
January 25, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE
CityWalk would have been the perfect place to throw a surprise 60th birthday party for Jon Jerde, the Venice-based architect who is known as the father of the modern mega-mall. He designed CityWalk, as well as Newport Beach's Fashion Island, the Glendale Galleria, Westside Pavilion and hundreds of others. But Jerde, one of the USC School of Architecture's most famous graduates (along with Frank Gehry), was feted Saturday at one of L.A.'s true cultural gems: Union Station.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2000
I'd really like to set the record straight once and for all as to who actually created the visual design style for CityWalk ("Fantasies of a City High on a Hill," by Nicolai Ouroussoff, April 9). As stated in your article, Jon Jerde was hired in 1985 by the Walt Disney Co. I was hired for two years as a full-time creative design consultant by Walt Disney Imagineering (WDI) beginning in 1987. Teamed with writers Jim Steinmeyer and Tony Morando, my first major project for WDI was Disney Island, a themed retail/restaurants/entertainment center for Walt Disney World.
OPINION
February 20, 2000
The Jerde Partnership International designed CityWalk and Canal City Hakata in Japan. Los Angeles is a city without edges. But there is a powerful need in people to come together and feel the restorative enregy provided by a complex communal experience. Our project uses this phenomenon as a model. Spontaneous communal experience is spatialized, so the high school contributes to L.A.'s evolving urban context by operating both as a school and as an integral part of the communal experience.
NEWS
January 25, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE
CityWalk would have been the perfect place to throw a surprise 60th birthday party for Jon Jerde, the Venice-based architect who is known as the father of the modern mega-mall. He designed CityWalk, as well as Newport Beach's Fashion Island, the Glendale Galleria, Westside Pavilion and hundreds of others. But Jerde, one of the USC School of Architecture's most famous graduates (along with Frank Gehry), was feted Saturday at one of L.A.'s true cultural gems: Union Station.
NEWS
July 5, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yoshiko Hirayama has been freed from her "life as a mole." She couldn't be happier. After years of toiling in crowded department stores brightened only by artificial light, "I can smile naturally, can enjoy myself, and that is passed on to the customers," said the manager of the Cue'ss International Network boutique. Her new home opens out into the heart of Canal City Hakata, a $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1991 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer. and
Eric Owen Moss is flipping through architecture magazines in his Culver City office. There's Moss' 708 House on one cover, his Petal House on another, his Adams House on another. Nearly two dozen magazines are marked to indicate photographs of his projects, but he hasn't a clue what the captions say. He can't read Japanese. Moss hasn't built a thing in Japan. He was invited to compete for Tokyo's New National Theatre a few years ago, but he didn't get the commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1988 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
The American Cinematheque is back on track, two years after a much publicized plan to house it in the Pan Pacific Auditorium fell apart. The basic plan hasn't changed: The facility will be a living museum of movies, using state-of-the-art technology and theaters to present films from all over the world to the public. It will also include a book store, a cafe and bar and lecture halls, providing a center for artists to talk about film with each other and the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1988 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
The American Cinematheque is back on track, two years after a much publicized plan to house it in the Pan Pacific Auditorium fell apart. The basic plan hasn't changed: The facility will be a living museum of movies, using state-of-the-art technology and theaters to present films from all over the world to the public. It will also include a book store, a cafe and bar and lecture halls, providing a center for artists to talk about film with each other and the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1991 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer. and
Eric Owen Moss is flipping through architecture magazines in his Culver City office. There's Moss' 708 House on one cover, his Petal House on another, his Adams House on another. Nearly two dozen magazines are marked to indicate photographs of his projects, but he hasn't a clue what the captions say. He can't read Japanese. Moss hasn't built a thing in Japan. He was invited to compete for Tokyo's New National Theatre a few years ago, but he didn't get the commission.
REAL ESTATE
July 10, 1988
The Los Angeles-based Jerde Partnership architectural firm, which gained world-wide recognition for its work on the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and its design of San Diego's Horton Plaza, has been chosen to revitalize two districts on the island of Kyushu in Japan.
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