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Jon Jory

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1992 | RICHARD STAYTON, Richard Stayton is a playwright and free-lance journalist
"The Humana Bible," they call it. Eighty-plus pages filled with rehearsal times, costume fitting hours, technical run-through dates, locations--an indispensable traffic guide for the casts and crews maneuvering backstage at the Actors Theatre of Louisville to mount 11 world premieres in less than a month. In theater corridors, actors bound head to toe in leather are practicing their lines for David Henry Hwang's "Bondage," his first play since the 1988 Tony-winning "M. Butterfly."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1992 | RICHARD STAYTON, Richard Stayton is a playwright and free-lance journalist
"The Humana Bible," they call it. Eighty-plus pages filled with rehearsal times, costume fitting hours, technical run-through dates, locations--an indispensable traffic guide for the casts and crews maneuvering backstage at the Actors Theatre of Louisville to mount 11 world premieres in less than a month. In theater corridors, actors bound head to toe in leather are practicing their lines for David Henry Hwang's "Bondage," his first play since the 1988 Tony-winning "M. Butterfly."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1997 | ROBERT KOEHLER
There's a certain resilience to Jane Martin's "Talking With . . . ," which has been revived too many times to count (and which premiered in Los Angeles about a decade ago at Taper Too). It hasn't aged like so many other 1980s plays, even though it's extremely vulnerable to casting miscalculations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Don't cry for Neil Simon. Yes, Eddie Murphy turned down his script for a new movie. But the Broadway critics didn't turn down his new female version of "The Odd Couple." They didn't exactly give the new "Odd Couple" a standing ovation, but the consensus was accepting. The New York Post's Clive Barnes best summed up the reaction to the show: "It has no right to work. Yet, almost disconcertingly, it does." Frank Rich of the New York Times was, likewise, not unamused.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1993 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a freezing Thursday night last week, a turn-of-the-century mansion loomed above the Ohio River like a Gothic Tara. Weary travelers emerged from airport vans to be greeted by a ruddy-faced gentleman with a handlebar mustache. "Welcome to the Humana Festival," he ceremoniously said to each of his 94 guests. "My name is Barry Bingham."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
When Marc Masterson took charge of Actors Theatre of Louisville, the challenges included moving into the shadow of an illustrious predecessor, Jon Jory, whose 30-year tenure had included creating the Humana Festival of New American Plays, an important annual destination for theater insiders. FOR THE RECORD: Marc Masterson: An article in the Feb. 19 Calendar section about Marc Masterson's appointment as the next artistic director of South Coast Repertory gave the wrong title for a play by William Shakespeare.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It's no way to get to know a city. Even if you wriggle out for a couple of hours, in search of the Louisville Slugger Museum and gift shop, attending the "visitor's weekend" edition of the Humana Festival of New American Plays affords hilariously little sense of where you are, exactly. The annual Actors Theatre of Louisville event, the most durable of its kind nationally, might as well be happening a few hundred miles off America's coastline.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Marc Masterson, who has been in charge of Actors Theatre of Louisville and its high-profile Humana Festival of New American Plays since 2000, was named Wednesday to succeed Martin Benson and David Emmes as artistic director of South Coast Repertory. He'll be only the second artistic director in the Costa Mesa theater's 47-year history, following the co-founders who have been partners at the acclaimed company's helm since its origins as an itinerant troupe operating out of Emmes' station wagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1985 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
The three women in Judy Romberger's comedy/drama "The Girls' Party," making its world premiere tonight at the Gaslamp Quarter Theatre, could be called her contemporaries: Pasadena housewives like her, who are at the age where "they're . . . tired of being wife and mother." In 1981, Romberger, a third-generation Pasadenan with about 40 short stories to her credit, published her first novel, "Lolly," (Doubleday) about a woman much like herself who was beginning the "perfect second marriage."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The notion of 10-minute plays may strike some as a busman's holiday for a playwright, until you start thinking about what a 10-minute play is not. The assignment (made nationally famous at the Actors' Theatre of Louisville) is not to write a 10-minute scene. It is not to write a sample script for sitcom producers. It is not to write a setup for a play-to-be. What it is, is a little like writing haiku (also deceptively simple, also painfully hard to do).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The argument over abortion rights is often shrill, angry and polarizing. It is apparently never-ending. The cast of "Keely and Du," which opens tonight at the Vanguard Theatre Ensemble in Fullerton, hopes its enactment of an explosive, if fictional, story about abortion can provoke thoughtfulness rather than rancor. Rehearsals have gone forward with the understanding that the play's the thing, rather than the expression of any personal conscience the actors might bring.
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