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Jon Jost

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Since the earlier work of independent/experimental film maker Jon Jost was so inaccessible as to defy watching it, his more recent films come as a decided, exciting surprise. "Uncommon Senses," which screens Tuesday at 8 p.m. at UCLA Melnitz with Jost present, has his characteristic rigor yet proves to be a stunning experience, a totally original and challenging essay on America. In his two fiction films, "Bell Diamond" (1986) and "Slow Moves" (1983), which screen Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Jon Jost may well be the most important American filmmaker who remains virtually unknown to moviegoers. Since 1974 he has made about a dozen features and 20 shorts, all of them grappling with some aspect of the American experience, yet only a couple have received even limited theatrical release. His films are usually seen only at festivals and in special presentations at academic and cultural institutions, where they have garnered considerable acclaim.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Independent filmmaker Jon Jost has been making films for 28 years but is still unknown to the public at large. Instrumental in the founding of Newsreel, the dynamic activist filmmaking collective of the '60s, and a frequently off-putting experimentalist in the early part of his career, Jost has evolved over the years into an increasingly compelling and accessible storyteller.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 30 years independent filmmaker Jon Jost toiled in obscurity, his films never receiving regular theatrical releases. That changed in 1992 when his last film, "All the Vermeers in New York," a poignant, romantic fable about the eternal and painful discrepancy between life and art--and of the values and instabilities of the 1980s--was released.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 30 years independent filmmaker Jon Jost toiled in obscurity, his films never receiving regular theatrical releases. That changed in 1992 when his last film, "All the Vermeers in New York," a poignant, romantic fable about the eternal and painful discrepancy between life and art--and of the values and instabilities of the 1980s--was released.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No filmmaker is more in the American grain than Jon Jost, who has been making films for 30 years. Yet not one of his 11 features has had a regular U.S. theatrical release--until now. When Jost's "All the Vermeers in New York" was named the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn.'s best independent/experimental film for 1991, the Landmark Theater chain decided to book it at its theaters around the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Art is the process by which we reclaim or redeem life's joys or horrors. Or is it? In the beautiful and troubling "All the Vermeers in New York" (Hillcrest Cinemas)--one of the most remarkable American pictures so far in 1992--filmmaker Jon Jost tries, a bit like Dutch painter Vermeer himself, to suggest something larger, more harrowing, by focusing brilliantly on something small, bright and seemingly mundane.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Jon Jost may well be the most important American filmmaker who remains virtually unknown to moviegoers. Since 1974 he has made about a dozen features and 20 shorts, all of them grappling with some aspect of the American experience, yet only a couple have received even limited theatrical release. His films are usually seen only at festivals and in special presentations at academic and cultural institutions, where they have garnered considerable acclaim.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
T he following are capsule reviews of this week's screenings at the AFI Film Festival of Los Angeles. Screenings take place at the Los Feliz Theater, 1822 N. Vermont Ave., Hollywood, except where noted. Tickets and information: (213) 520-2000 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. FRIDAY "Bell Diamond" (U.S.A., 1986, 5 p.m.). Jon Jost is a film maker who makes Jim Jarmusch look as extravagant as the younger Michael Cimino.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like him or not, Hal Hartley is a young director who most assuredly has his own style, as he skirts overly eccentric ponderousness yet demonstrates such a good knack for the incongruous deadpan gag.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Art is the process by which we reclaim or redeem life's joys or horrors. Or is it? In the beautiful and troubling "All the Vermeers in New York" (Hillcrest Cinemas)--one of the most remarkable American pictures so far in 1992--filmmaker Jon Jost tries, a bit like Dutch painter Vermeer himself, to suggest something larger, more harrowing, by focusing brilliantly on something small, bright and seemingly mundane.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No filmmaker is more in the American grain than Jon Jost, who has been making films for 30 years. Yet not one of his 11 features has had a regular U.S. theatrical release--until now. When Jost's "All the Vermeers in New York" was named the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn.'s best independent/experimental film for 1991, the Landmark Theater chain decided to book it at its theaters around the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Independent filmmaker Jon Jost has been making films for 28 years but is still unknown to the public at large. Instrumental in the founding of Newsreel, the dynamic activist filmmaking collective of the '60s, and a frequently off-putting experimentalist in the early part of his career, Jost has evolved over the years into an increasingly compelling and accessible storyteller.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Since the earlier work of independent/experimental film maker Jon Jost was so inaccessible as to defy watching it, his more recent films come as a decided, exciting surprise. "Uncommon Senses," which screens Tuesday at 8 p.m. at UCLA Melnitz with Jost present, has his characteristic rigor yet proves to be a stunning experience, a totally original and challenging essay on America. In his two fiction films, "Bell Diamond" (1986) and "Slow Moves" (1983), which screen Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the films screening in the UCLA Film Archives' "Cinematic Images of the Black Male" at Melnitz Theater through Tuesday is the late documentarian Marlon Riggs' altogether remarkable 86-minute "Black Is . . . Black Ain't" (Saturday at 7:30 p.m.). It is a final testament from an important, groundbreaking filmmaker dying of AIDS.
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