Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJon Krakauer
IN THE NEWS

Jon Krakauer

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2008 | Kevin Crust
Into the Wild Paramount, $29.99; Blu ray/HD, $39.99 Sean Penn beautifully adapted the Jon Krakauer bestseller about an idealistic young man and his stunning search for transcendence in a film that is at once epic and intimate. Christopher McCandless, hauntingly portrayed by Emile Hirsch, crisscrossed the American West on a post-collegiate sojourn before disappearing into the Alaskan wilderness in 1992.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
David Oliver Relin, Gregory Mortenson's co-author on the bestseller "Three Cups of Tea," has died. The 49-year-old committed suicide Nov. 15 in Oregon, the Multnomah County medical examiner announced late Sunday, saying blunt force trauma to the head was the cause of death. Relin's suicide adds to the shadow cast on "Three Cups of Tea," which tells of Mortenson's travels in the mountains of Afghanistan and Pakistan and his work creating schools for the children, particularly girls, in those remote regions.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everest seems to have poisoned many lives. --From the book "Into Thin Air" * At this moment, the airline has lost his luggage. The climactic slide for tonight's public slide show was left in Texas. He is at the end of a grueling, 32-city book tour, and this is his last interview. The real turmoil, though, has been longer in the making. And Jon Krakauer still hasn't had time for proper reflection on the indelible changes in his life after a single disastrous encounter with Mt. Everest.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2009 | Dan Neil
Pat Tillman, unlikely football hero and unlikelier warrior, went to Afghanistan and got accidentally wasted by the men in his own Ranger platoon. It happens. Among the many shadows Jon Krakauer illuminates in his compelling and dispiriting book, "Where Men Win Glory," is the commonness of fratricide in high-tech warfare. Thus the military's bleak poetry of misadventure: FUBAR, SNAFU, Charlie-Fox. But the story here isn't Tillman's unexceptional death, or exceptional life for that matter, but what Krakauer sees as a political crime committed by the Bush administration's propaganda machine as it tried to make Tillman a martyr in the global war on terror.
BOOKS
February 4, 1996 | Suzan Nightingale, Anchorage writer Suzan Nightingale is a columnist for the Anchorage Daily News and commentator for the Alaska Public Radio Network
Any Alaskan can tell you about the disaster that got away--the squall that didn't sink her kayak, the turbulence that didn't swamp his bouncing Piper Cub, the camping trip that degenerated into a search for the trail back home. These stories usually end in one of two ways: "Boy, were we stupid," or, more likely, "Boy, were we lucky." Chris McCandless was neither stupid nor lucky when, on April 28, 1992, he walked into the open country north of Mt. McKinley.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
David Oliver Relin, Gregory Mortenson's co-author on the bestseller "Three Cups of Tea," has died. The 49-year-old committed suicide Nov. 15 in Oregon, the Multnomah County medical examiner announced late Sunday, saying blunt force trauma to the head was the cause of death. Relin's suicide adds to the shadow cast on "Three Cups of Tea," which tells of Mortenson's travels in the mountains of Afghanistan and Pakistan and his work creating schools for the children, particularly girls, in those remote regions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1997
Never has a mountaineering disaster received such attention, or criticism, as the one that occurred on Mt. Everest one year ago. But then it is Everest, at 29,028 feet the world's highest peak. Climbers in several parties were trapped by a vicious storm high on the mountain on May 10, 1996. Eight lost their lives in the tempest, and four others died on the mountain before the month was out. How could it happen? What can be done to prevent it from happening again?
BOOKS
July 13, 2003 | Emily Bazelon, Emily Bazelon is a senior editor at Legal Affairs magazine.
Tromping around Salt Lake City with a long beard, wild-man hair and wooden staff, the man was simply known as the "Jesus Guy." But today Brian David Mitchell, and his wife, have a wider reputation as the alleged kidnappers of 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2008 | Kevin Crust
Into the Wild Paramount, $29.99; Blu ray/HD, $39.99 Sean Penn beautifully adapted the Jon Krakauer bestseller about an idealistic young man and his stunning search for transcendence in a film that is at once epic and intimate. Christopher McCandless, hauntingly portrayed by Emile Hirsch, crisscrossed the American West on a post-collegiate sojourn before disappearing into the Alaskan wilderness in 1992.
BOOKS
July 13, 2003 | Emily Bazelon, Emily Bazelon is a senior editor at Legal Affairs magazine.
Tromping around Salt Lake City with a long beard, wild-man hair and wooden staff, the man was simply known as the "Jesus Guy." But today Brian David Mitchell, and his wife, have a wider reputation as the alleged kidnappers of 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everest seems to have poisoned many lives. --From the book "Into Thin Air" * At this moment, the airline has lost his luggage. The climactic slide for tonight's public slide show was left in Texas. He is at the end of a grueling, 32-city book tour, and this is his last interview. The real turmoil, though, has been longer in the making. And Jon Krakauer still hasn't had time for proper reflection on the indelible changes in his life after a single disastrous encounter with Mt. Everest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1997
Never has a mountaineering disaster received such attention, or criticism, as the one that occurred on Mt. Everest one year ago. But then it is Everest, at 29,028 feet the world's highest peak. Climbers in several parties were trapped by a vicious storm high on the mountain on May 10, 1996. Eight lost their lives in the tempest, and four others died on the mountain before the month was out. How could it happen? What can be done to prevent it from happening again?
BOOKS
February 4, 1996 | Suzan Nightingale, Anchorage writer Suzan Nightingale is a columnist for the Anchorage Daily News and commentator for the Alaska Public Radio Network
Any Alaskan can tell you about the disaster that got away--the squall that didn't sink her kayak, the turbulence that didn't swamp his bouncing Piper Cub, the camping trip that degenerated into a search for the trail back home. These stories usually end in one of two ways: "Boy, were we stupid," or, more likely, "Boy, were we lucky." Chris McCandless was neither stupid nor lucky when, on April 28, 1992, he walked into the open country north of Mt. McKinley.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2009 | Dan Neil
Pat Tillman, unlikely football hero and unlikelier warrior, went to Afghanistan and got accidentally wasted by the men in his own Ranger platoon. It happens. Among the many shadows Jon Krakauer illuminates in his compelling and dispiriting book, "Where Men Win Glory," is the commonness of fratricide in high-tech warfare. Thus the military's bleak poetry of misadventure: FUBAR, SNAFU, Charlie-Fox. But the story here isn't Tillman's unexceptional death, or exceptional life for that matter, but what Krakauer sees as a political crime committed by the Bush administration's propaganda machine as it tried to make Tillman a martyr in the global war on terror.
MAGAZINE
December 14, 2003 | Craig Medred, Craig Medred is Outdoor Editor of the Anchorage Daily News.
Timothy Treadwell, the avowed bear man of the Alaska wilderness, lived poor and little known for most of his 46 years despite a desire for the spotlight of celebrity. He claimed to have led a life of drugs, brawls and booze until, in the late 1980s, he found his way to the grizzlies, most recently in Katmai National Park and Preserve on the Alaska Peninsula about 300 miles southwest of Anchorage. His cause: to save them from hunters and poachers who apparently didn't exist.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|