Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJon L Breen
IN THE NEWS

Jon L Breen

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reference librarian may seem an unlikely occupation for a man who writes murder mysteries set in the high-stakes, sometimes unsavory world of horse racing, but Jon L. Breen doesn't see it that way. As Breen likes to point out, "the reference librarian, like the horse picker, is in the detective business." As a librarian, Breen works in relative obscurity at Rio Hondo College in Whittier. But as a mystery writer and expert in the field, the Fountain Valley author maintains a high profile.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 10, 2007
The coverage of Barbaro and his death, with emphasis on T.J. Simers' column and the over-the-top excesses of some of the horse's fans, draws attention from the real story. There are many reasons given for the decline of horse racing, which has been my favorite sport for nearly 50 years. That familiar phrase "improving the breed" is a joke. When I first started following racing in the 1950s, horses running 20 to 30 times a year, 90 to more than 100 times in a career, were not that unusual.
Advertisement
SPORTS
May 4, 2002
Albert E. Frias' letter [April 27] is unfair to Bob Mieszerski. To expect a newspaper handicapper to show a profit on flat bets on all selections is simply not reasonable. Mieszerski's job obligates him to pick a horse in every race, and no horseplayer can expect to turn a profit betting every race. Even given that limitation, Mieszerski was ahead of the game for most of the long Santa Anita meeting and ended it with a loss of only $100 or so, a remarkable achievement. Jon L. Breen Fountain Valley
SPORTS
May 4, 2002
Albert E. Frias' letter [April 27] is unfair to Bob Mieszerski. To expect a newspaper handicapper to show a profit on flat bets on all selections is simply not reasonable. Mieszerski's job obligates him to pick a horse in every race, and no horseplayer can expect to turn a profit betting every race. Even given that limitation, Mieszerski was ahead of the game for most of the long Santa Anita meeting and ended it with a loss of only $100 or so, a remarkable achievement. Jon L. Breen Fountain Valley
SPORTS
February 10, 2007
The coverage of Barbaro and his death, with emphasis on T.J. Simers' column and the over-the-top excesses of some of the horse's fans, draws attention from the real story. There are many reasons given for the decline of horse racing, which has been my favorite sport for nearly 50 years. That familiar phrase "improving the breed" is a joke. When I first started following racing in the 1950s, horses running 20 to 30 times a year, 90 to more than 100 times in a career, were not that unusual.
MAGAZINE
June 23, 1996
I thoroughly enjoyed Bruce Newman's article on mystery writers ("A Million Mysteries in the Naked City," May 19)--not just because many of my favorite writers were included but also because of what Newman pointed out--that these books are so popular because they're good stories. I love Patricia Cornwell's books and care not about her personality. Mary Higgins Clark is a great source of reading pleasure: no dirt, gore or abuse of animals or children. And, of course, the fantastic Sue Grafton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2001
Re "3rd Strike Is the Tip of an Iceberg of Crime," letters, Nov. 10: Jeff McCombs suggests that the California voters who passed the three-strikes law intended life imprisonment for a three-time pizza thief. The voters are not that foolish or bloodthirsty. Under the three-strikes law, the first two strikes must be either violent or serious crimes. Serious crimes are those that are potentially violent through the availability of a deadly weapon. The three-strikes law is intended to remove from society repeat, violent or serious offenders who continue to commit crimes.
NEWS
March 26, 2000 | DICK LOCHTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Has the detective short story seen its best years? That's the theory floated by Jon L. Breen in the introduction to "Sleuths of the Century" (Carroll & Graf, $26, 579 pages), his and fellow author-editor Ed Gorman's collection of the shorter adventures of 25 world-class crime solvers. "Given the changing fashions in crime fiction," Breen writes, ". . . the detective story may turn out to be a 20th century art form as surely as silent movies or radio drama."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2006 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
IF Arthur Conan Doyle tired of Sherlock Holmes, readers never have. To meet the ongoing demand, other writers have been creating adventures for the great detective for more than a century. Scholars estimate that more than 900 "noncanonical" Sherlock tales exist. The new collection, "Ghosts in Baker Street," adds 10 to the count. Authors began expanding Holmes' caseload while Doyle was alive, and those stories anticipated the modern phenomenon of fan fiction.
MAGAZINE
June 23, 1996
I thoroughly enjoyed Bruce Newman's article on mystery writers ("A Million Mysteries in the Naked City," May 19)--not just because many of my favorite writers were included but also because of what Newman pointed out--that these books are so popular because they're good stories. I love Patricia Cornwell's books and care not about her personality. Mary Higgins Clark is a great source of reading pleasure: no dirt, gore or abuse of animals or children. And, of course, the fantastic Sue Grafton.
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reference librarian may seem an unlikely occupation for a man who writes murder mysteries set in the high-stakes, sometimes unsavory world of horse racing, but Jon L. Breen doesn't see it that way. As Breen likes to point out, "the reference librarian, like the horse picker, is in the detective business." As a librarian, Breen works in relative obscurity at Rio Hondo College in Whittier. But as a mystery writer and expert in the field, the Fountain Valley author maintains a high profile.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Donald Saulson of Huntington Beach and his daughter Elisabeth have self-published "A Pocket Guide to Food Additives" (VPS Publishing; $1.95). The 64-page booklet offers a comprehensive dictionary of more than 500 food additives and the safety ratings nutrition and health authorities have given them. Why food additives are used and how to interpret the ingredients labels on food packages are covered in brief introductory chapters.
NEWS
April 10, 2000 | DICK LOCHTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the past 26 years, Robert B. Parker has written 36 books, a prodigious achievement by any standard. Even more remarkable, nearly all are worth reading. Most--26 by my count--have featured Parker's famous Boston private detective Spenser. Though, of late, the plots have thinned and Spenser's cool demeanor has slipped into smugness, the series has continued to be among the best of its kind. Last year's "Hush Money," for example, found author and creation at top form.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|