Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJon Shear
IN THE NEWS

Jon Shear

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Urbania," a young man's harrowing odyssey in overcoming trauma, is an intense experience and so, it turns out, is an interview with the film's director, Jon Shear. "The movie is about a man who has no control over his life--and I had no sense of control over the film while I was making it," said Shear over a recent breakfast at a West Hollywood restaurant.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jon Shear's "Urbania" is such a powerful experience that it is equally effective whether you have figured out from the start where it is headed or whether its denouement comes as a complete surprise. Actor-turned-director Shear has reworked Daniel Reitz's play "Urban Folk Tales" into a daring and unnerving evocation of contemporary big-city life where sex and violence seem so frequently interlinked.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jon Shear's "Urbania" is such a powerful experience that it is equally effective whether you have figured out from the start where it is headed or whether its denouement comes as a complete surprise. Actor-turned-director Shear has reworked Daniel Reitz's play "Urban Folk Tales" into a daring and unnerving evocation of contemporary big-city life where sex and violence seem so frequently interlinked.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Urbania," a young man's harrowing odyssey in overcoming trauma, is an intense experience and so, it turns out, is an interview with the film's director, Jon Shear. "The movie is about a man who has no control over his life--and I had no sense of control over the film while I was making it," said Shear over a recent breakfast at a West Hollywood restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outfest, the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, which opens tonight with a premiere gala and the documentary "The Eyes of Tammy Faye" at the newly air-conditioned Orpheum, 842 S. Broadway, has an especially strong lineup this year. With each passing year, the festival attracts an increasingly large straight audience, with good reason: On the one hand, there are more mainstream gay films with solid crossover appeal, and on the other, gay cinema remains venturesome in styles and themes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2000 | LISA BOONE
FILM 'Mambo Cafe' Skips L.A.: Los Angeles audiences will have to wait to see the popular Mexican soap opera star Thalia in her first movie, "Mambo Cafe." The movie's distributor, Unapix Entertainment, has decided to test the market for the low-budget romantic comedy only in New York, starting Aug. 18. If it performs well there, Unapix might expand the film into markets such as Los Angeles or San Antonio. The movie's director, Reuben Gonzalez, is frustrated that Latinos in Los Angeles, the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2003 | Philip Brandes;F. Kathleen Foley;David C. Nichols
A merciless punch to the underbelly of hypocrisy, the Blank Theatre Company's "Sanguine" showcases a promising new voice in Andy Hyman's insightful, well-crafted -- though at times overreaching -- portrait of a corporate downsizing victim's psychological disintegration. Jon Shear's staging of Hyman's brisk, one-act monologue (winner of the Blank's 2001 Young Playwrights Festival) stars its original performer, Jeremy Sisto, best known as the psychopathic Billy on HBO's "Six Feet Under."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
Jeremy Sisto gets around. In the last three years he has portrayed Jesus and Julius Caesar on TV, played Jennifer Lopez's dysfunctional brother ("Angel Eyes") on film and stunned cable viewers as a creepily charming, bipolar sexual predator who's obsessed with his own sister (HBO's "Six Feet Under"). But for the last two weeks, Sisto has been going nowhere fast at the Blank Theatre Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2004 | David C. Nichols;F. Kathleen Foley;Don Shirley;Rob Kendt
The invisible expanse that divides actor from audience stretches even further in "The Fourth Wall" at Theatre/Theater. A.R. Gurney's revised 1992 political comedy posits the proscenium as metaphor for American isolationism, and theater as fulcrum for true progress. Gurney conceived his narrative as a two-act play in response to the first Bush presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley;David C. Nichols;Rob Kendt
Seldom has didacticism been couched in so charming a format. Child-friendly and consistently diverting, "Atalanta," a world premiere musical at the Powerhouse, gives a lighthearted spin to serious feminist issues. Granted, the theme can be heavy-handed, but an engaging cast delivers the message with a light hand. Based on an excerpt from Marlo Thomas' groundbreaking 1970s TV special, "Free to Be ...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|