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Jon Voight

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April 29, 1990 | Stacy Jenel Smith \f7
He's been publicly visible as an advocate for aid for Vietnam veterans and the homeless--and privately immersed in spiritual study--but it's been five years since Jon Voight made his last big-screen splash, his Oscar-nominated performance in "Runaway Train." "It was about time for me to get back to work," acknowledges the actor, who's now preparing to star as Dr. Robert Gale in Carolco's "Final Warning: The Legacy of Chernobyl" for Turner Network Television.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Television Critic
"Ray Donovan," a new drama premiering Sunday on Showtime, takes the unlikely tack of overlaying a "Boston-Irish dysfunctional family with criminal elements" story - you know the type - onto a backdrop of big-shot Hollywood. And gets away with it. Created by Ann Biderman ("Southland"), it is on paper not a show I'd expect to like. I grow weary of antiheroes. I tire of the way that TV and movies picture Hollywood just to kick it around. Notwithstanding the creeps and hacks that doubtless can be found in its corner offices and power corridors, it's also a place where a lot gets done by people committed to good work, who go home to more or less (factoring out the money, privilege and hired help)
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NEWS
April 21, 1991 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
"It has been a difficult journey for us," Jon Voight was saying. "We have learned so much along the way. We don't know what we have on film, but everyone is trying to do their very best. We are raising a lot of questions." Voight, who won the best actor Oscar for 1978's "Coming Home," was hot and exhausted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2010 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
The family of Staff Sgt. Javier Zamora, who survived a tour of duty in Iraq as a helicopter door gunner only to die in a 2007 car crash after his return home to Hemet, sat clustered around his bouquet-covered gravestone Monday at the West Los Angeles National Cemetery. "The military was his life," Alicia Oliva, a sister, said of the 40-year-old Army National Guardsman and father of three, who had planned to return for a second tour in Iraq. "It makes you realize this is where they belong."
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask Jon Voight why he decided to direct and the Oscar-winner breaks into a mischievous grin. "We are just getting older," quips the 56-year-old Voight. "We have to find other other employment!" It's an overcast afternoon on the set of his latest movie, "The Tin Soldier," which premieres Wednesday on Showtime. Voight makes his directorial debut and stars in the contemporary fantasy based on Hans Christian Anderson's beloved fairy tale, "The Steadfast Tin Soldier."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1993 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lamenting what he called a "tremendous injustice," actor Jon Voight on Monday urged President Clinton to commute the life sentence of former civilian Navy intelligence officer Jonathan Pollard, who was convicted in 1987 of spying for Israel.
SPORTS
December 18, 2002 | Larry Stewart
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, heard, observed, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed. * What: "Second String" Where: TNT, tonight, 8 and 10 In this fictional two-hour movie, the Buffalo Bills, coming off a great season, are playing the San Diego Chargers in the first round of the playoffs.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The filmmakers who created HBO's "The Last of His Tribe" were wrapped in blankets and praised with song Thursday before the screening of the film at the Directors Guild of America. The brief ceremony by four American Indians was an "appropriate way of expressing gratitude," said Dave Archambault, president of the American Indian College Fund.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Actor Danny Huston recalls the first time he saw "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre." "I remember projecting it literally on a wall in Ireland as I was growing up. It was how I said hello to my grandfather," he says. That grandfather was the great character actor Walter Huston, who died before his grandson was born, and the film was directed by his legendary father, John Huston. The 1948 morality tale about a trio of greedy gold prospectors, which also starred Humphrey Bogart, is one of the films that Huston and his sister, actress Anjelica Huston, will be presenting at the inaugural TCM Classic Film Festival, kicking off Thursday in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
In the new movie "Spread," Ashton Kutcher plays Nikki, a pretty but shallow grifter who finances his glamorous existence in Los Angeles by methodically seducing rich women and then living off their largess. Nikki isn't technically a prostitute, though in some ways a simple cash transaction for his services might be easier on him. "There's an old saying 'We're all whores. Just some of us get paid,' " says Kutcher, who also produced the film. "I think people are in general using people all the time."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2008 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
The dancing rabbis are whirling around the stage of the Chabad "To Life" Telethon, unmistakably Hasidic in their thick beards and black coats. But who's the tall dancer with the clean shave and long blond hair? As longtime viewers of the telethon know, he's Jon Voight. Jon Voight of "Midnight Cowboy." Angelina Jolie's father. Lifelong Catholic. And yet here he is year after year, dancing with the rabbis in a Hollywood television studio, a black yarmulke on his head.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2004 | By Mitch Albom, Special to The Times
Writers believe they can fix the world with a sentence. But it's always the next sentence. Salvation, redemption, the perfect last kiss -- they are all but one elusive word away. So we search. We can't help it. We search. We try. We throw out. We search again. It is a noble effort if you are writing a book. On the other hand, if you are doing a play or a movie, it can make you, with all due literary respect, a hefty pain in the butt. I learned this firsthand during rehearsals for the stage version of "Tuesdays with Morrie," which began two winters ago off-Broadway.
SPORTS
December 18, 2002 | Larry Stewart
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, heard, observed, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed. * What: "Second String" Where: TNT, tonight, 8 and 10 In this fictional two-hour movie, the Buffalo Bills, coming off a great season, are playing the San Diego Chargers in the first round of the playoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He seems a bit befuddled, the lanky, bearded man on the elevator who can't get the buttons to work. "What floor are you headed to?" he asks, and a second after I see that we're going to the same place, it registers that I'm talking to Jon Voight, the man I'm here to see.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2004 | By Mitch Albom, Special to The Times
Writers believe they can fix the world with a sentence. But it's always the next sentence. Salvation, redemption, the perfect last kiss -- they are all but one elusive word away. So we search. We can't help it. We search. We try. We throw out. We search again. It is a noble effort if you are writing a book. On the other hand, if you are doing a play or a movie, it can make you, with all due literary respect, a hefty pain in the butt. I learned this firsthand during rehearsals for the stage version of "Tuesdays with Morrie," which began two winters ago off-Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He seems a bit befuddled, the lanky, bearded man on the elevator who can't get the buttons to work. "What floor are you headed to?" he asks, and a second after I see that we're going to the same place, it registers that I'm talking to Jon Voight, the man I'm here to see.
NEWS
March 8, 1998 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday "The Fixer" / 8 p.m. Showtime Jon Voight stars in this cynical tale of corruption as Jack Killoran, a wealthy Chicago attorney who solves problems for greedy city officials by way of favors or payoffs. When a desperate colleague asks him to fix a messy murder, Jack reluctantly agrees but then has an attack of conscience after nearly dying in an equestrian accident.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between 1985 and 1995, Jon Voight made only three feature films, concentrating primarily on cable movies and TV miniseries. But now the 58-year-old Oscar winner is making up for lost screen time. Since playing the treasonous agent Jim Phelps in the blockbuster "Mission: Impossible," Voight has been working nonstop in features.
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