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Jon Wellinghoff

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BUSINESS
March 8, 2006
* President Bush plans to nominate two industry veterans to fill vacancies on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The White House said the president intended to name Philip D. Moeller of Washington, an executive of Alliant Energy Corp., and Jon Wellinghoff, a partner in Las Vegas-based energy regulatory law firm Beckley Singleton.
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NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON -- Alarmed by the shooting attack on a Silicon Valley-area power station last spring, several senators called on regulators to review security operations at electrical utilities and consider imposing new rules to protect against future attacks. “Last year's sophisticated attack on the Metcalf substation in California's Silicon Valley was a wake-up call to the risk of physical attacks on the grid,” said a letter the senators sent regulators Friday. “The incident came uncomfortably close to causing a shutdown of a critical substation which could have resulted in a massive blackout in California and elsewhere in the West.” The letter was signed by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada and fellow Democratic Sens.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. Senate approved the appointment of three new members to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, giving the agency its first full five-member panel since August 2001. The appointments of Marc Spitzer, Philip Moeller and Jon Wellinghoff to the commission, which overseas the U.S. wholesale power market and sets rates for interstate oil and natural gas pipelines, were approved without objection.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Evan Halper and Marc Lifsher
Shooters armed with assault rifles and some knowledge of electrical utilities have prompted new worries on the vulnerability of California's vast power grid. A 2013 attack on an electric substation near San Jose that nearly knocked out Silicon Valley's power supply was initially downplayed as vandalism by Pacific Gas & Electric Co., the facility's owner. Gunfire from semiautomatic weapons did extensive damage to 17 transformers that sent grid operators scrambling to avoid a blackout.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2014 | By Evan Halper and Marc Lifsher
Shooters armed with assault rifles and some knowledge of electrical utilities have prompted new worries on the vulnerability of California's vast power grid. A 2013 attack on an electric substation near San Jose that nearly knocked out Silicon Valley's power supply was initially downplayed as vandalism by Pacific Gas & Electric Co., the facility's owner. Gunfire from semiautomatic weapons did extensive damage to 17 transformers that sent grid operators scrambling to avoid a blackout.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON -- Alarmed by the shooting attack on a Silicon Valley-area power station last spring, several senators called on regulators to review security operations at electrical utilities and consider imposing new rules to protect against future attacks. “Last year's sophisticated attack on the Metcalf substation in California's Silicon Valley was a wake-up call to the risk of physical attacks on the grid,” said a letter the senators sent regulators Friday. “The incident came uncomfortably close to causing a shutdown of a critical substation which could have resulted in a massive blackout in California and elsewhere in the West.” The letter was signed by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada and fellow Democratic Sens.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Michael Hiltzik
The giant investment bank can't say it wasn't warned. In September, commenting on what appeared to be JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s consistent and intentional flouting of the rules governing its communications with regulators, Jon Wellinghoff, chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, said he wasn't all that impressed with Morgan's excuse that its expensive corporate lawyers made a mistake. "'The dog ate my homework' doesn't work for me," he said. This week he showed just how unimpressed he was. Ruling in a case brought by California's wholesale power system, FERC suspended Morgan's right to sell electricity via power auctions for six months, starting next April 1. The firm, which doesn't own any generating plants in California but owns the right to trade power generated by some in-state plants, will still be able to sell that power in California -- but will have to accept a price that could be as low as its cost.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2013 | By Evan Halper
NEWARK, Del. - The thick blue cables and white boxes alongside an industrial garage here look like those in any electric-car charging station. But they work in a way that could upend the relationship Americans have with energy. The retrofitted Mini Coopers and other vehicles plugged into sockets where a Chrysler plant once stood do more than suck energy out of the multi-state electricity grid. They also send power back into it. With every zap of juice into or out of the region's fragile power network, the car owner gets paid.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. Senate approved the appointment of three new members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, giving the agency its first full five-member panel since August 2001. Marc Spitzer, Philip Moeller and Jon Wellinghoff were approved without objection. Their terms will extend through mid-2011, 2010 and 2008, respectively. Moeller, 44, is a former Senate staffer and utility lobbyist. Wellinghoff, 57, is a former consumer advocate in Nevada.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Kinder Morgan Energy Partners, the second-largest publicly traded pipeline partnership, won federal approval Thursday for a rate plan it sought to fund a $400-million expansion of its California-to-Las Vegas fuel pipeline. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, meeting in Washington, approved Kinder Morgan's rate-plan request for the 550-mile Calnev pipeline, which ships gasoline, diesel and jet fuel from Colton.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2013 | By Evan Halper
NEWARK, Del. - The thick blue cables and white boxes alongside an industrial garage here look like those in any electric-car charging station. But they work in a way that could upend the relationship Americans have with energy. The retrofitted Mini Coopers and other vehicles plugged into sockets where a Chrysler plant once stood do more than suck energy out of the multi-state electricity grid. They also send power back into it. With every zap of juice into or out of the region's fragile power network, the car owner gets paid.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Michael Hiltzik
The giant investment bank can't say it wasn't warned. In September, commenting on what appeared to be JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s consistent and intentional flouting of the rules governing its communications with regulators, Jon Wellinghoff, chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, said he wasn't all that impressed with Morgan's excuse that its expensive corporate lawyers made a mistake. "'The dog ate my homework' doesn't work for me," he said. This week he showed just how unimpressed he was. Ruling in a case brought by California's wholesale power system, FERC suspended Morgan's right to sell electricity via power auctions for six months, starting next April 1. The firm, which doesn't own any generating plants in California but owns the right to trade power generated by some in-state plants, will still be able to sell that power in California -- but will have to accept a price that could be as low as its cost.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. Senate approved the appointment of three new members to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, giving the agency its first full five-member panel since August 2001. The appointments of Marc Spitzer, Philip Moeller and Jon Wellinghoff to the commission, which overseas the U.S. wholesale power market and sets rates for interstate oil and natural gas pipelines, were approved without objection.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2006
* President Bush plans to nominate two industry veterans to fill vacancies on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The White House said the president intended to name Philip D. Moeller of Washington, an executive of Alliant Energy Corp., and Jon Wellinghoff, a partner in Las Vegas-based energy regulatory law firm Beckley Singleton.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
The egregiously light wrist-slap that federal regulators gave to JPMorgan Chase & Co. over its $125-million rip-off of California consumers has drawn the attention of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass). The first-term senator, who has already made a mark in Washington for her no-nonsense questioning of financial regulators, has asked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to justify its settlement -- a $410-million penalty that includes no criminal referrals, even though FERC identified three energy traders and a top JPMorgan executive whose fingerprints were all over the scheme.
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