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Jonah Odim

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July 29, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cardiac surgeon Jonah Odim, whose career has been jeopardized by a long-running inquest in Canada into the deaths of 12 children under his care in 1994, can continue studying and practicing at UCLA Medical Center, a medical committee at the hospital has ruled. Odim is free to treat patients but for now is on a "research rotation" as part of his transplantation fellowship, a medical center spokesman said.
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NEWS
July 29, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cardiac surgeon Jonah Odim, whose career has been jeopardized by a long-running inquest in Canada into the deaths of 12 children under his care in 1994, can continue studying and practicing at UCLA Medical Center, a medical committee at the hospital has ruled. Odim is free to treat patients but for now is on a "research rotation" as part of his transplantation fellowship, a medical center spokesman said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Jonah Odim says he walked into a "hornet's nest" four years ago, and the hornets keep following him wherever he goes: across the Canadian border and over state lines, from Georgia to California. Despite his stellar credentials--his Yale education, his Harvard and University of Chicago training--the 43-year-old cardiac surgeon keeps getting stung by questions from 1994, that horrible year in Winnipeg, Canada, in which 12 of his tiny surgical patients died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Jonah Odim says he walked into a "hornet's nest" four years ago, and the hornets keep following him wherever he goes: across the Canadian border and over state lines, from Georgia to California. Despite his stellar credentials--his Yale education, his Harvard and University of Chicago training--the 43-year-old cardiac surgeon keeps getting stung by questions from 1994, that horrible year in Winnipeg, Canada, in which 12 of his tiny surgical patients died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | From Times staff and wire reports
Ten of 12 young children who underwent heart surgery and died at a Winnipeg hospital in 1994--under the care of a physician now at UCLA--might have survived if given proper treatment, a report released Monday said. "The evidence suggests that some of the children need not have died," Associate Chief Judge Murray Sinclair wrote in his final report, following one of the longest inquests in Canadian history. The children, operated on by Dr.
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