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Jonas Salk

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REAL ESTATE
November 18, 1990
Dr. Jonas Salk, developer of the polio vaccine, is scheduled to speak Dec. 13 at a ceremony to present him with the first annual Presidential Commemorative Award of the Los Angeles chapter, American Institute of Architects, at the Pacific Design Center. The award was created to focus on the role of architects and others in enriching the environment. Admission to the 7 p.m. address is $25 for AIA members and students, in advance, $35 for non-members at the door.
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HEALTH
April 18, 2005 | Sara K. Clarke, Times Staff Writer
In the midst of the Great Depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a survivor of polio, sparked one of the greatest biomedical breakthroughs of the century. He did it by starting a fundraising campaign. His efforts drew ridicule from those who said the nation could never defeat polio when citizens could barely feed their families. But everyone, Roosevelt argued, could spare a dime.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1995
Most Americans older than 50 still carry vivid memories of the poliomyelitis scourge: young friends struck down and confined to iron lungs and stiff metal braces, stern orders from parents to keep out of swimming pools where the paralyzing viral disease was thought to be spread. But by 1961, in one of the most concerted public-health battles ever waged, polio had nearly been eradicated. No name was more closely linked in the public mind to this battle than that of Dr. Jonas Salk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1985 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
Thirty years ago, the onset of summer each year brought not only warm weather but the potential of a polio outbreak. Millions of parents feared that their children might contract the paralyzing disease if they were allowed to congregate at swimming pools or movie theaters. Then, on April 12, 1955, the long-awaited announcement was made: Dr. Jonas Salk's polio vaccine had been proven safe and effective in massive field trials among almost 2 million schoolchildren.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK and SIOK-HIAN TAY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A private appeal from the archbishop of Los Angeles for the archdiocese's 2,900 nuns and priests to volunteer for tests of an experimental AIDS vaccine developed by Dr. Jonas Salk, the polio vaccine pioneer, was "premature" and made without Salk's knowledge, a key project researcher said Sunday. Dr.
NEWS
June 24, 1995 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonas Edward Salk, the legendary immunologist who earned the undying admiration of the American people but the scorn of his scientific peers with his dramatic discovery of the first polio vaccine, died Friday of congestive heart failure. He was 80. Although Salk had a history of heart trouble, his death was unexpected. Last October he participated in 80th birthday celebrations that attracted hundreds of people and ranged from Westwood to La Jolla.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Picasso wasn't the first. Years before Francoise Gilot had even met Picasso, there was someone else. Sure, her name would be linked to the crusty Spaniard's long after her tempestuous years as his mistress. But Picasso did have a predecessor and Gilot remembers spotting him from the rarefied height of her grandmother's staircase in Paris. "It was the first of January, and my grandmother had a kind of salon, and that day there were some friends of my grandmother who came.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Oh, how he annoys them. "Salk?" they say, questioningly, derisively, with a roll of the eyeballs and clucking of the tongue and a stiffening of the back. "I'll tell you right off the bat," one declares bluntly. "I don't think Salk is a good scientist." Adds another: "He doesn't really understand what he's doing. He just forges ahead." Of course, this is not for publication. No, no, no. They mustn't be quoted. It would be unprofessional, untoward, to cast aspersions on a legend, although some do.
OPINION
July 28, 1991 | SANDY SCHUCKETT, SANDY SCHUCKETT , president of the Los Angeles School Librarians Assn. , is the librarian at Eastman Avenue Elementary School in East Los Angeles. She is concerned about nerd-bashing in the media:
It has become increasingly annoying and disheartening to see and hear the growing amount of nerd-bashing that continues to take place in the print and nonprint media. Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison and Benjamin Franklin were nerds. Frederick Douglass and George Washington Carver would have been nerds had they not lived during times of slavery and legalized bigotry. Chopin and Beethoven were nerds. Jonas Salk is probably a nerd. What did these nerds have in common? They were all readers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1995
Re "A Remarkable Life, an Extraordinary Era," editorial, June 26: Dr. Jonas Salk well deserves your tribute for having contributed to the elimination of the horrible polio scourge. That he was able to do so was because Drs. John Enders, Tom Weller and Fred Robbins at Harvard Medical School developed the technique of virus culture in roller tubes, including the polio virus, the measles virus, the varicella/zoster virus, etc., for which they most deservedly received the Nobel Prize.
NEWS
June 27, 1995 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the AIDS of my generation, kids growing up in the '40s and '50s, a generation that knew nothing of sexually transmitted diseases or drug overdoses. It was polio. A big, bad bug sitting out there ready to pounce on us. The President, Franklin D. Roosevelt, had been its most visible victim, a constant reminder to our parents of how this awful disease ravaged the body. "You can't do this, you can't do that"--how often we heard these words.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1995
Most Americans older than 50 still carry vivid memories of the poliomyelitis scourge: young friends struck down and confined to iron lungs and stiff metal braces, stern orders from parents to keep out of swimming pools where the paralyzing viral disease was thought to be spread. But by 1961, in one of the most concerted public-health battles ever waged, polio had nearly been eradicated. No name was more closely linked in the public mind to this battle than that of Dr. Jonas Salk.
NEWS
June 24, 1995 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonas Edward Salk, the legendary immunologist who earned the undying admiration of the American people but the scorn of his scientific peers with his dramatic discovery of the first polio vaccine, died Friday of congestive heart failure. He was 80. Although Salk had a history of heart trouble, his death was unexpected. Last October he participated in 80th birthday celebrations that attracted hundreds of people and ranged from Westwood to La Jolla.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | KATHRYN BOLD
As the former live-in love of Pablo Picasso, wife of Dr. Jonas Salk and an artist in her own right, Francoise Gilot knows a thing or two about style. Because of her personal style and role in the arts, the Severin Wunderman Museum in Irvine chose Gilot as the recipient of its 1994 Jean Cocteau International Style Award.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Releasing long-awaited test results, polio pioneer Jonas Salk announced Wednesday that his experimental AIDS vaccine appears to boost the immune systems of people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. But his work met with immediate skepticism from other scientists gathered here at the Ninth International Conference on AIDS. "I'm less than enthusiastic," said David Ho of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Institute in New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1985
The manner in which the media treats the so-called large bonuses to corporate executives bothers me because it lacks perspective. Therefore, I submit the following two comparisons. The lifetime earnings of Thomas Edison, Charles Steinmetz, Albert Einstein, or perhaps Jonas Salk, were exceeded by the 1985 bonus of Roger B. Smith of General Motors. But . . . Chrysler's Lee Iacocca's seven-year cumulative bonuses for saving billions of capital and thousands of jobs was exceeded by the fee paid to either Thomas Hearns or Marvelous Marvin Hagler for beating on each other for seven minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1985
We honor Elvis Presley for his music, James Dean for his one-of-a-kind acting ability ("James Dean: Rebel With an Agent," by Debra Zahn, Sept. 29). Both men have made a meteoric impact on our society. Now, people of America, who is going to handle the licensing of Jonas Salk, a man rarely mentioned, except in medical circles and trivia games, who, with his polio vaccine, saved generations of lives. I'll wear his T-shirt any day! WAYNE MITCHELL Anaheim
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Oh, how he annoys them. "Salk?" they say, questioningly, derisively, with a roll of the eyeballs and clucking of the tongue and a stiffening of the back. "I'll tell you right off the bat," one declares bluntly. "I don't think Salk is a good scientist." Adds another: "He doesn't really understand what he's doing. He just forges ahead." Of course, this is not for publication. No, no, no. They mustn't be quoted. It would be unprofessional, untoward, to cast aspersions on a legend, although some do.
NEWS
September 12, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day after public health officials reported that the Western Hemisphere has been free of new polio cases for more than a year, polio vaccine inventor Jonas Salk on Friday urged prompt elimination of the crippling disease "in the world as a whole." Freeing the Americas from polio's scourge "could have been done several decades ago," Salk said during a rare public speech at a statewide biotechnology industry meeting in La Jolla. "And it can be done in the world as a whole.
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