Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJonas Savimbi
IN THE NEWS

Jonas Savimbi

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
March 11, 2002 | PIERO GLEIJESES, Piero Gleijeses, a professor of U.S. foreign policy at Johns Hopkins University, is author of "Conflicting Missions: Havana, Washington and Africa, 1959-1976" (University of North Carolina Press, 2002).
Friend and foe acknowledged the abilities and charisma of Jonas Savimbi, the Angolan rebel leader who was killed by government troops last month. "Savimbi is very intelligent," Lucio Lara, a senior aide to his bitter rival, Agostinho Neto, once admitted. Savimbi also never deviated from his overriding goals or principles. It is odd, however, that Americans have failed to appreciate what these goals and principles were.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 17, 2002
Re "Angola's Jonas Savimbi Was No Freedom Fighter," Commentary, March 11: Piero Gleijeses is to be commended for bringing Africa's tragic problems to the fore in a media world obsessed with the Middle East and for raising a much-needed alarm about the U.S. proclivity for supporting vicious warlords just because it seems a good idea at the time. However, his attempt to burnish the regressive Fidel Castro's image as a genuine revolutionary is a major disservice. When a usurper like Castro has his revolutionary credentials certified by the likes of Henry Kissinger, you know he's a phony.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 31, 1986
Jonas Savimbi, who is in Washington trying to raise money for his guerrilla war in Angola, has been a rebel for most of his adult life. In the early 1960s, when Angola was still a colony of Portugal, Savimbi fought for independence. In the years since 1975, when the Portuguese granted independence, Savimbi has been fighting against the Marxists who came to power with the help of Cuba and the Soviet Union.
OPINION
March 11, 2002 | PIERO GLEIJESES, Piero Gleijeses, a professor of U.S. foreign policy at Johns Hopkins University, is author of "Conflicting Missions: Havana, Washington and Africa, 1959-1976" (University of North Carolina Press, 2002).
Friend and foe acknowledged the abilities and charisma of Jonas Savimbi, the Angolan rebel leader who was killed by government troops last month. "Savimbi is very intelligent," Lucio Lara, a senior aide to his bitter rival, Agostinho Neto, once admitted. Savimbi also never deviated from his overriding goals or principles. It is odd, however, that Americans have failed to appreciate what these goals and principles were.
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher flew Monday to this war-ravaged capital to try to jump-start the process to end one of the world's deadliest conflicts. But the visit from the highest-ranking U.S. official since Angola became independent in 1975 was marred by the nonappearance of Jonas Savimbi, leader of the rebel movement known as the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, or UNITA.
OPINION
March 17, 2002
Re "Angola's Jonas Savimbi Was No Freedom Fighter," Commentary, March 11: Piero Gleijeses is to be commended for bringing Africa's tragic problems to the fore in a media world obsessed with the Middle East and for raising a much-needed alarm about the U.S. proclivity for supporting vicious warlords just because it seems a good idea at the time. However, his attempt to burnish the regressive Fidel Castro's image as a genuine revolutionary is a major disservice. When a usurper like Castro has his revolutionary credentials certified by the likes of Henry Kissinger, you know he's a phony.
NEWS
March 5, 1986
Angolan rebels said they seized the diamond-mining town of Andrada in the northeast, capturing more than 150 foreign workers. The National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, led by Jonas Savimbi, said in a Lisbon statement that the foreigners--Portuguese, Filipinos, Romanians, West Germans and British--will be freed after being marched 700 miles to rebel base areas in southeastern Angola. It also claimed that its forces killed 60 government troops while losing 19.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rebel leader Jonas Savimbi said he would take part in a runoff election against President Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who he said failed to win the needed 50% of the votes in the Sept. 29-30 election. Under pressure from Savimbi, officials have not released final results; partial returns showed Dos Santos with about 50%. Savimbi has charged vote fraud and hinted that his rebel group would renew the long civil war.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Angolan rebel leader Jonas Savimbi said he will step down as head of the UNITA movement he created 25 years ago if he loses in Angola's first free elections, planned for autumn 1992. But Savimbi, 56, said he is confident that UNITA--the Portuguese acronym for the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola--will win and that he will become Angola's first freely elected president.
NEWS
February 24, 2002 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The death of Angolan rebel leader Jonas Savimbi, who helped drag out one of Africa's longest-running civil wars, has rekindled hopes for peace in a country ravaged by decades of conflict, analysts said Saturday. But they warned against celebrating until there are concrete assurances that Savimbi's National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, known by the Portuguese acronym UNITA, is ready to lay down its arms.
NEWS
August 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States will support new United Nations sanctions on Angola's longtime rebel leader, Jonas Savimbi, and his UNITA movement, according to the Washington Post. The newspaper, quoting unidentified senior officials, said the Clinton administration also is prepared to sell military transport planes to the government. The sanctions--which U.S. officials expect to be imposed by the U.N. Security Council this week--and the possible aircraft sale reflects Washington's exasperation with Savimbi.
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher flew Monday to this war-ravaged capital to try to jump-start the process to end one of the world's deadliest conflicts. But the visit from the highest-ranking U.S. official since Angola became independent in 1975 was marred by the nonappearance of Jonas Savimbi, leader of the rebel movement known as the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, or UNITA.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Past bombed-out buildings and burned-out cars, near grim skull-and-crossbones signs for a roadside minefield, a dusty cluster of military tents here holds the hopes for lasting peace in Africa's longest civil war. But Angola has dashed such hopes before. And despite a shaky 14 1/2-month cease-fire after two decades of death and devastation, it may be doing it again.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | Associated Press
Angola's warring factions signed a cease-fire Tuesday intended to allow their leaders to end the southern African nation's 19-year civil war this weekend. The truce reached after six hours of talks was the first agreed to by both sides since May 15, 1991. It cleared the way for further negotiations on final details of a peace accord. The peace pact is to be signed Sunday in Lusaka, the capital of neighboring Zambia.
NEWS
September 16, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonas Savimbi, once America's favored guerrilla chieftain, felt the wrath of the United Nations on Wednesday as the Security Council condemned his rebellion against the Angolan government and approved sanctions against his political movement. The council acted after receiving a report from Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali that 1,000 people are dying every day from the war, "the highest fatality rate of any conflict in the world."
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an important symbolic victory, guerrilla leader Jonas Savimbi captured the highlands city of Huambo in the southwest African nation of Angola last week after a 55-day battle with government forces that left thousands of civilians dead. But the rebel leader, an increasingly unpredictable and unpopular figure who refuses to accept his party's second-place finish in national elections last September, didn't ride his victory into a new round of peace talks, as many had hoped.
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
UNITA rebel leader Jonas Savimbi agreed to start U.N.-brokered peace talks with the government next week, U.N. officials announced Friday as violence flared throughout war-torn Angola. The agreement came at the end of a sobering week for the government. Rebels defeated government troops in the key northern oil town of Soyo and threatened to overrun the oil-rich Cabinda area and diamond mines in the northeast.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|