Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJonathan Ames
IN THE NEWS

Jonathan Ames

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg, Kellogg is lead blogger for Jacket Copy, The Times' books blog.
Jonathan Ames may be the closest thing our generation gets to Norman Mailer. Literally a literary pugilist -- his essay of a boxing bout with another writer is included -- he's got an ever-present, outsized sense of himself. He's willing to have adventures and chronicle them, often at the expense of his own dignity. Despite his advancing age and well-rendered perversions, he's wooed no shortage of women.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The Brooklyn-based writer Jonathan Ames was in Southern California not long ago, not long before the third-season premiere of "Bored to Death," a lovely and good-hearted detective comedy about a Brooklyn-based writer named Jonathan Ames. Ames, who created and writes or co-writes every episode, had come west to appear on Craig Ferguson's talk show, where the two would discuss hair and masturbation. The writer is not shy about airing what for most people would remain hidden desires: "What's Not to Love?
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The Brooklyn-based writer Jonathan Ames was in Southern California not long ago, not long before the third-season premiere of "Bored to Death," a lovely and good-hearted detective comedy about a Brooklyn-based writer named Jonathan Ames. Ames, who created and writes or co-writes every episode, had come west to appear on Craig Ferguson's talk show, where the two would discuss hair and masturbation. The writer is not shy about airing what for most people would remain hidden desires: "What's Not to Love?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2009 | Matea Gold
The novelist Jonathan Ames was rereading works by the pulp writer David Goodis several years ago when he first got the inspiration for "Bored to Death," the latest quirky comedy to join HBO's lineup. Intrigued by the character of the hard-boiled detective, he briefly considered posting an ad on Craigslist advertising his services as an investigator. "I just wanted adventures," he said. Instead, Ames penned a dark short story about a writer named Jonathan Ames who poses as a detective on Craigslist.
BOOKS
August 26, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Yet another tale of angst, alienation and ennui in New York City. By day, Alexander Vine works as a doorman at a ritzy Midtown hotel; by night, he prowls the seamy underworld of the Lower East Side. As the Manhattan drug scene has become passe, Jonathan Ames uses the narrator's morbid interest in street prostitutes and bums as a metaphor for the degradation lurking behind the urban glitter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2006 | Brendan Halpin, Special to The Times
THE most important factor to consider in judging autobiographical writing is not whether it is true; fundamentally, who cares if someone you've never met is telling you lies in order to better entertain you? What is important is whether the persona the author creates is someone the reader wants to spend several hours with. The narrator's ability to engage the reader trumps even the inherent interest of the events being written about.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2009 | Matea Gold
The novelist Jonathan Ames was rereading works by the pulp writer David Goodis several years ago when he first got the inspiration for "Bored to Death," the latest quirky comedy to join HBO's lineup. Intrigued by the character of the hard-boiled detective, he briefly considered posting an ad on Craigslist advertising his services as an investigator. "I just wanted adventures," he said. Instead, Ames penned a dark short story about a writer named Jonathan Ames who poses as a detective on Craigslist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1985
I found Rone Tempest's article (March 19) concerning the remnants of the British Raj in India very interesting. The piece was well-written and, for The Times, mercifully short. It was, however, unfair to English cricket when it cited India's dominance in the so-called World Championship of Cricket (recently played in Australia) as an example of the students' mastery over their teachers. As I'm sure Tempest is well aware--but for some reason failed to mention--only days before the Australian one-day matches began, England completed a long and exhausting tour of the subcontinent.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By Steve Appleford, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Fiona Apple is thinking hard about palm trees. It's a momentary distraction from talking about her new album, "The Idler Wheel ...," and a quick photo session in the backyard of her longtime manager, Andy Slater, in Beverly Hills. But as she wanders the grass with a large fig leaf in her hands, her head tilted skyward, the singer's mind has gone elsewhere, in search of a particular species of palm and definitely not finding it. "I'm sorry I don't have the right kind of palm tree," says Slater, teasing from the nearby patio.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2010
UNDERRATED Relatively Clean Rivers: We've been intrigued by this obscure band's self-titled 1975 release since it was name-checked by Wilco in advance of the album "Sky Blue Sky. " After finally tracking down a copy, we not only hear its easygoing guitars in Wilco and Blitzen Trapper, but there's something about its woozy, rural psychedelia that sounds like nothing else. Start with the song "Hello Sunshine" and watch your Indian Summer get a little sunnier. Ted Danson on 'Bored to Death': Right down to its Brooklyn setting, this HBO series couldn't be hipper with Wes Anderson favorite Jason Schwartzman starring as writer-series creater Jonathan Ames.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg, Kellogg is lead blogger for Jacket Copy, The Times' books blog.
Jonathan Ames may be the closest thing our generation gets to Norman Mailer. Literally a literary pugilist -- his essay of a boxing bout with another writer is included -- he's got an ever-present, outsized sense of himself. He's willing to have adventures and chronicle them, often at the expense of his own dignity. Despite his advancing age and well-rendered perversions, he's wooed no shortage of women.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2006 | Brendan Halpin, Special to The Times
THE most important factor to consider in judging autobiographical writing is not whether it is true; fundamentally, who cares if someone you've never met is telling you lies in order to better entertain you? What is important is whether the persona the author creates is someone the reader wants to spend several hours with. The narrator's ability to engage the reader trumps even the inherent interest of the events being written about.
BOOKS
August 26, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Yet another tale of angst, alienation and ennui in New York City. By day, Alexander Vine works as a doorman at a ritzy Midtown hotel; by night, he prowls the seamy underworld of the Lower East Side. As the Manhattan drug scene has become passe, Jonathan Ames uses the narrator's morbid interest in street prostitutes and bums as a metaphor for the degradation lurking behind the urban glitter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1985
I found Rone Tempest's article (March 19) concerning the remnants of the British Raj in India very interesting. The piece was well-written and, for The Times, mercifully short. It was, however, unfair to English cricket when it cited India's dominance in the so-called World Championship of Cricket (recently played in Australia) as an example of the students' mastery over their teachers. As I'm sure Tempest is well aware--but for some reason failed to mention--only days before the Australian one-day matches began, England completed a long and exhausting tour of the subcontinent.
BOOKS
April 9, 2006
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction 1 Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See (Random House: $13.95) Two women in 19th century China. 2 The Mermaid Chair by Sue Monk Kidd (Penguin: $14) A woman confronts her long-dormant desires. 3 Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (Vintage: $14) Reunited boarding-school graduates explore their shared past. 4 In the Company of Cheerful Ladies by Alexander M. Smith (Anchor: $12.95) New cases for "No.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|