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Jonathan Borofsky

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June 3, 1993 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"String of Consciousness," the title of Jonathan Borofsky's latest installation, sounds like (but isn't) a malapropism. Not that Borofsky is averse to Freudian slips--malapropisms, jokes, dreams. This is the stuff of his art, which registers alternately as slapstick routine or intellectual exercise. Indeed, Borofsky likes to walk the line--one foot dangling toward free-wheeling excess, the other staying the course with the deliberation of the seasoned obsessive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1999 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Jonathan Borofsky is responsible for some of the finer moments in Los Angeles public sculpture. Downtown, his figures of flying men hang from the ceiling of the Civic Center Metro Station, his "Molecule Man" sculpture, composed of four, 32-foot-tall perforated aluminum figures stands before the U.S. Federal Building, and his giant black "Hammering Man," with a mechanized arm moving up and down, is in the courtyard of the California Mart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Three years ago Jonathan Borofsky was one of the most visible artists in America. The subject of a huge retrospective that roamed from one museum to the next from 1984 to 1986, Borofsky staked out a spot in the history books with an enormously popular show that summed up his life's work as an artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1993 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"String of Consciousness," the title of Jonathan Borofsky's latest installation, sounds like (but isn't) a malapropism. Not that Borofsky is averse to Freudian slips--malapropisms, jokes, dreams. This is the stuff of his art, which registers alternately as slapstick routine or intellectual exercise. Indeed, Borofsky likes to walk the line--one foot dangling toward free-wheeling excess, the other staying the course with the deliberation of the seasoned obsessive.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1990 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perched at an angle on a corner of the roof of the Newport Harbor Art Museum is its latest acquisition, "Ruby," a 5-foot-tall sculpture by the internationally known Jonathan Borofsky. The faceted, plastic piece contains an internal lighting system and swaying, diamond-shaped light deflectors. During the day it looks like a solid form. At night, when the lights are on (they stay on till 10 p.m.), it looks like a transparent illuminated beacon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1985 | WILLIAM WILSON
In some circles ritual counting is regarded as a mildly neurotic activity requiring psychological therapy. In the art world, the compulsion made one artist count in more ways than one. In 1969 Jonathan Borofsky began toting up to infinity by recording numbers neatly on paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1999 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Jonathan Borofsky is responsible for some of the finer moments in Los Angeles public sculpture. Downtown, his figures of flying men hang from the ceiling of the Civic Center Metro Station, his "Molecule Man" sculpture, composed of four, 32-foot-tall perforated aluminum figures stands before the U.S. Federal Building, and his giant black "Hammering Man," with a mechanized arm moving up and down, is in the courtyard of the California Mart.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art has acquired $100,000 worth of prints from Gemini G.E.L., a Los Angeles printmaker known for its collaborative work with such artists as Richard Diebenkorn, Sam Francis, Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, Saul Steinberg and Jonathan Borofsky. Eighteen prints by the artists were scheduled to be unveiled at the museum's "Gemini G.E.L.: Art and Collaboration" exhibit on Sunday.
NEWS
May 19, 2005
How true, art may be found anywhere and may be quite subjective ["L.A.'s Close Encounters of the Artsy Kind," May 5]. Several years ago as we drove home on the freeway from a Jonathan Borofsky show that included a large number of pamphlets artistically thrown on the floor, we passed a whirling display of scattered newspapers that had fallen off the back of a truck. My husband and I looked at each other and said, "Oh look, more Borofsky." Kathy Horbund Venice
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1992 | MIMI KO
In an effort to increase AIDS awareness, the Newport Harbor Art Museum and several other Orange County museums will participate in the Day Without Art today. The "Ruby" sculpture by Jonathan Borofsky that sits atop the Newport Harbor Art Museum and has become known as the museum's trademark will be draped over to symbolize the many artists who have died of AIDS, museum officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1990 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perched at an angle on a corner of the roof of the Newport Harbor Art Museum is its latest acquisition, "Ruby," a 5-foot-tall sculpture by the internationally known Jonathan Borofsky. The faceted, plastic piece contains an internal lighting system and swaying, diamond-shaped light deflectors. During the day it looks like a solid form. At night, when the lights are on (they stay on till 10 p.m.), it looks like a transparent illuminated beacon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Three years ago Jonathan Borofsky was one of the most visible artists in America. The subject of a huge retrospective that roamed from one museum to the next from 1984 to 1986, Borofsky staked out a spot in the history books with an enormously popular show that summed up his life's work as an artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1985 | WILLIAM WILSON
In some circles ritual counting is regarded as a mildly neurotic activity requiring psychological therapy. In the art world, the compulsion made one artist count in more ways than one. In 1969 Jonathan Borofsky began toting up to infinity by recording numbers neatly on paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1987 | Associated Press
"The Reemergent Figure: Seven Sculptors at Storm King Art Center" is this year's special exhibition at the center's 400-acre sculpture park, about 65 miles north of New York City at Mountainville, N.Y. The exhibition, open through Oct. 31, features 22 recent works by Magdalena Abakanowicz, Jonathan Borofsky, Sandro Chia, Antony Gormley, Tom Otterness, Richard Rosenblum and Joel Shapiro.
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