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Jonathan Bromberg

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BUSINESS
October 12, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ
Recently, an employee of Aerotest Inc. was faced with an astronomical medical bill after his young son, who has Down's syndrome, was taken to the hospital with a spinal ailment. But when the $64,000 bill reached the company's claims office, Jonathan Bromberg, the head of the employee benefits office, practically flipped. "I knew that it should have been lower than that," he said.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ
Recently, an employee of Aerotest Inc. was faced with an astronomical medical bill after his young son, who has Down's syndrome, was taken to the hospital with a spinal ailment. But when the $64,000 bill reached the company's claims office, Jonathan Bromberg, the head of the employee benefits office, practically flipped. "I knew that it should have been lower than that," he said.
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BUSINESS
April 19, 1994
Aerotest Inc., an Irvine aircraft testing and design firm, said it has nearly completed the move of its Mojave Airport operations to the Santa Barbara Airport. The transfer from Mojave, where the company maintained and retrofitted transport aircraft, began in December, said Jonathan Bromberg, Aerotest's vice president of administration. Aerotest has more than 200 employees at Santa Barbara and plans to add more, Bromberg said. Only a few workers remain at Mojave, he said.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1990
Aerotest Inc., a privately held aviation services company based in Irvine, has named three new vice presidents: Jonathan Bromberg, administration; Richard Horn, transport maintenance; and Ron Neal, development. Bromberg joined Aerotest in 1988 after 15 years with Tracor Flight Systems and 13 years with the U.S. Navy.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2006 | From Reuters
In a large-scale test, transplanted pancreas cells eliminated the need for insulin in some diabetes patients, but for many the benefit was short-lived. In numerous cases in which the treatment was initially successful, too many transplanted cells eventually stopped working. The authors of the study, published in today's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, said that refining their methods should improve the success rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1990 | CORINNE FLOCKEN
It takes more than a couple of flippers to trip up true love. That, in a clamshell, is the premise behind "The Mermaid and the Prince," the latest children's theater offering from the Peter Pan Players of Laguna Hills at the Iglesia Park Community Room. This one-hour romp, based loosely on Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid" fairy tale, follows the adventures of a headstrong sea nymph who trades her fins for feet in a bid for a handsome prince. A familiar story?
BUSINESS
April 2, 1993 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Aerotest Inc. about to join the list of companies that have been driven out of California because of an inhospitable business climate created by the state government? To listen to Jonathan Bromberg, Aerotest's vice president of administration, one would think so. But state officials tell a different story. They say Aerotest has ignored their efforts to help the company.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Insurance specialists and company officials predict that the case of an AIDS patient who lost his company-paid health benefits will likely spur reform of the nation's 18-year-old benefits and retirement law. Reacting to a U.S. Supreme Court decision to not hear a case in which a Houston music company slashed the health coverage of John McGann, benefits experts agreed that the federal Employee Retirement Income Security Act, known as ERISA, will most likely be overhauled in the near future.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1992 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the Antelope Valley Freeway, about 90 miles northeast of Los Angeles, the desert stretches for miles on every side. Gray mountains are etched in the horizon. Windmills twirl in the gusting wind. Suddenly, on the bleak landscape dead ahead appear scores of huge silver jets, their tail fins gleaming in the sun. It's no mirage. It's Mojave Airport, the nation's biggest homeless shelter for grounded planes. The logos on the planes reveal the names of bankrupt airlines.
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