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Jonathan Caouette

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
By any rational standard, "Tarnation" ought to be unwatchable, the kind of self-indulgent, erratic mess that sends sensible people fleeing in the opposite direction. It ought to be, but it's not. For filmmaking is hardly a rational endeavor -- it's about emotional connection, creativity and raw talent. And it's the intuitive cinematic gifts of 31-year-old director Jonathan Caouette, who made the film out of a lifetime of home movies for $218.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
By any rational standard, "Tarnation" ought to be unwatchable, the kind of self-indulgent, erratic mess that sends sensible people fleeing in the opposite direction. It ought to be, but it's not. For filmmaking is hardly a rational endeavor -- it's about emotional connection, creativity and raw talent. And it's the intuitive cinematic gifts of 31-year-old director Jonathan Caouette, who made the film out of a lifetime of home movies for $218.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2004 | Jonathan Caouette, Special to The Times
"Tarnation," an official selection of the 2004 Cannes Director's Fortnight, a sidebar of sorts to the Cannes film festival, is Jonathan Caouette's documentary self-portrait chronicling his chaotic upbringing in a dysfunctional Texas family and the unexpected relationship that develops with his mentally ill mother, Renee. "Tarnation" was screened at the Sundance Film Festival this year, where it inspired a great deal of buzz and, eventually, a distribution deal for the 31-year-old filmmaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2004 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
DURING Jonathan Caouette's first appearance at the New York Film Festival on Oct. 1, the 31-year-old filmmaker found himself cast in the new role of celebrity as he hit the red carpet -- actually beige, and not a carpet -- outside Lincoln Center's Avery Fisher Hall at 8:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2004 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
DURING Jonathan Caouette's first appearance at the New York Film Festival on Oct. 1, the 31-year-old filmmaker found himself cast in the new role of celebrity as he hit the red carpet -- actually beige, and not a carpet -- outside Lincoln Center's Avery Fisher Hall at 8:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2004 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
This fall, the stream of politically pointed documentaries flowing into theaters won't be subsiding. There's a John Kerry biography ("Going Upriver: The Long War of John Kerry"), a behind-the-scenes look at anti-globalism pranksters ("The Yes Men"), and a film about the gay marriage debate ("Tying the Knot"). Even that lightning rod of '70s controversy, Patty Hearst, is revisited ("Guerrilla: The Taking of Patty Hearst").
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
A film that cost less than $200 to make is among the attractions at Roger Ebert's sixth annual Overlooked Film Festival. This year's festival, which opens Wednesday in Champaign, Ill., includes a variety of big-budget movies and independent works such as "Tarnation" by Jonathan Caouette, which cost $187 to make on a computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2004 | From a Times staff writer
First-time feature director Ferenc Toth's "Unknown Soldier" won best narrative feature at the Los Angeles Film Festival, and Jonathan Caouette's "Tarnation" took best documentary. Toth, whose film concerns a bright Harlem teen who suddenly finds himself homeless, and Caouette, whose documentary about his relationship with his troubled mother also screened at the Cannes Film Festival, will receive unrestricted cash grants underwritten by Target Stores of $50,000 and $25,000, respectively.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Though "Sideways" has received accolades as best picture of 2004 from more than 30 critics' groups, Clint Eastwood's pugilist drama "Million Dollar Baby" was voted top film Saturday by the National Society of Film Critics. In one of several split decisions handed down at the group's 39th annual meeting at Sardi's restaurant in New York, Hilary Swank tied for best actress for her performance as a talented young boxer managed by a trainer played by Eastwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
When Nicholas James Baba-Conn made his premature entry into the world in 2002, he was given the slimmest chances of survival. He was 100 days premature and weighed less than a pound. His heart was "the size of a cashew" and he wore tiny blood pressure sleeves that looked like Band-Aids. Fitting comfortably in one's hand, Nicholas looked as helpless and fragile as a baby bird.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2004 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
This fall, the stream of politically pointed documentaries flowing into theaters won't be subsiding. There's a John Kerry biography ("Going Upriver: The Long War of John Kerry"), a behind-the-scenes look at anti-globalism pranksters ("The Yes Men"), and a film about the gay marriage debate ("Tying the Knot"). Even that lightning rod of '70s controversy, Patty Hearst, is revisited ("Guerrilla: The Taking of Patty Hearst").
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2004 | Jonathan Caouette, Special to The Times
"Tarnation," an official selection of the 2004 Cannes Director's Fortnight, a sidebar of sorts to the Cannes film festival, is Jonathan Caouette's documentary self-portrait chronicling his chaotic upbringing in a dysfunctional Texas family and the unexpected relationship that develops with his mentally ill mother, Renee. "Tarnation" was screened at the Sundance Film Festival this year, where it inspired a great deal of buzz and, eventually, a distribution deal for the 31-year-old filmmaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | Mark Caro, Chicago Tribune
Movies really are about giving up control. In the ideal experience, you sit in a dark room and become totally immersed in what's happening on the screen. Choice doesn't enter into it. Thought doesn't enter into it. If you're in the hands of a masterful storyteller, you should feel you're vicariously living another life. Yet as the movie world orbits into an increasingly high-tech universe, consumers are finding they have more control over what they consider a night at the movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Several years ago, when Clint Eastwood's eclectic and exceptional "Unforgiven" was on its way to winning four Oscars, including best picture, an executive at Warner Bros. commented, "If that had been our picture, we would have ruined it." The comment was not a little ironic, because technically "Unforgiven" was a Warners picture.
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