Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJonathan D Krane
IN THE NEWS

Jonathan D Krane

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 5, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Look who's back. Three years after his Management Co. Entertainment Group belly-flopped financially, the once-hot producer Jonathan D. Krane is hoping to stage a comeback with his third "Look Who's Talking" comedy. The Tristar release opens today, this time with dogs doing the talking instead of kids. Krane, who is a student of physics in his spare time, is returning after experiencing firsthand one of Hollywood's Newtonian laws--that what goes up in the movie business eventually comes down.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 5, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Look who's back. Three years after his Management Co. Entertainment Group belly-flopped financially, the once-hot producer Jonathan D. Krane is hoping to stage a comeback with his third "Look Who's Talking" comedy. The Tristar release opens today, this time with dogs doing the talking instead of kids. Krane, who is a student of physics in his spare time, is returning after experiencing firsthand one of Hollywood's Newtonian laws--that what goes up in the movie business eventually comes down.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
September 15, 1990 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an expected move, Jonathan D. Krane resigned Friday as chairman and chief executive of the financially troubled Management Co. Entertainment Group. Krane's departure comes as MCEG is fighting off involuntary bankruptcy proceedings. The firm is also in default on more than $100 million in debt owed to creditors. Raymond H. Godfrey Jr., the company's president and chief operating officer, was named as Krane's temporary replacement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG and SHAUNA SNOW and ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the the nation's press
Management Company Entertainment Group Inc. announced plans Thursday to finance and produce at least one film directed by a graduate of USC's School of Cinema-Television and to develop at least one student screenplay each year. The entertainment company also plans to underwrite most of the costs of USC's twice-yearly student film festival (24 student films will be debuted at the inaugural festival, June 13-22), according to Jonathan D. Krane, the company's chairman and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an impressive $127 million in box office grosses, the sleeper hit movie "Look Who's Talking" has helped a little-known independent film company in more ways than one. The film proved that Management Co. Entertainment Group, the movie's producer, was capable of more than art-house fare. It resuscitated the career of John Travolta, a key MCEG client and the film's star. And it established the credibility of MCEG's chief executive, a flamboyant young lawyer named Jonathan D.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1989 | Compiled by David Pecchia
Always (Amblin/Universal). Shooting in Montana and Los Angeles. Steven Spielberg directs Richard Dreyfuss and Holly Hunter in this contemporized redo of the 1943 Spencer Tracy-Irene Dunne flick "A Guy Named Joe." Dreyfuss, in the Tracy role, portrays a firefighter who meets a fiery death but makes an angelic return to Earth to assist an old co-worker who woos his bereaved girlfriend. Executive producers Kathleen Kennedy and Frank Marshall (who else?). Producer Richard Vane. Screenwriters Jerry Belson and Ron Bass.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1990 | ALAN CITRON
Management Company Entertainment Group, which recently received tentative approval for restructuring a $72.5-million bridge loan, announced that investment banker Raymond H. Godfrey Jr. was hired as the company's president and chief operating officer. Godfrey, 45, was managing director and senior vice president-investment banking at Rodman & Renshaw Capital Group in New York. He also serves on the MCEG board of directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2001 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
Frank Morrison (John Travolta) is definitely one of life's good guys. You can tell by the care he puts into building wooden sailboats, which no one does anymore because everybody wants fiberglass and plastic these days. For this, some folks might call Frank a loser, if he weren't so gosh-darned committed to his 12-year-old son, Danny (Matt O'Leary). Boy, are these two close! You can tell by the easy rapport they have over burgers and iced tea. Nothing stronger for Frank to drink, you understand.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1990 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an expected move, Jonathan D. Krane resigned Friday as chairman and chief executive of the financially troubled Management Co. Entertainment Group. Krane's departure comes as MCEG is fighting off involuntary bankruptcy proceedings. The firm is also in default on more than $100 million in debt owed to creditors. Raymond H. Godfrey Jr., the company's president and chief operating officer, was named as Krane's temporary replacement.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an impressive $127 million in box office grosses, the sleeper hit movie "Look Who's Talking" has helped a little-known independent film company in more ways than one. The film proved that Management Co. Entertainment Group, the movie's producer, was capable of more than art-house fare. It resuscitated the career of John Travolta, a key MCEG client and the film's star. And it established the credibility of MCEG's chief executive, a flamboyant young lawyer named Jonathan D.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG and SHAUNA SNOW and ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the the nation's press
Management Company Entertainment Group Inc. announced plans Thursday to finance and produce at least one film directed by a graduate of USC's School of Cinema-Television and to develop at least one student screenplay each year. The entertainment company also plans to underwrite most of the costs of USC's twice-yearly student film festival (24 student films will be debuted at the inaugural festival, June 13-22), according to Jonathan D. Krane, the company's chairman and chief executive officer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the clever and diverting dark comedy "Lucky Numbers," John Travolta's Russ Richards is the king of all he surveys--even if it isn't much of a kingdom. He's an ebullient Harrisburg, Pa., TV weatherman, and his throne is his special booth at a Denny's. He's a world-class schmoozer who plays the local celebrity bit to the hilt, but he has set his sights higher: His dream is to be a game-show host. (Watch, out, Bob Barker.) Meanwhile, Russ is facing a major crisis.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|