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Jonathan Demme

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August 22, 1993 | JOHN ANDERSON, NEWSDAY
In what he calls "the most overproduced home movie in the history of home movies," Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme--who's given us psychopaths ("The Silence of the Lambs"), Mafia brides ("Married to the Mob") and Talking Heads ("Stop Making Sense")--turns his camera on a relative, the Rev. Robert Castle. "Cousin Bobby," airing Tuesday on PBS' "P.O.V.," is a film profile of the activist minister, pastor of St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Harlem, and a general rabble-rouser.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been corrected. See below for details. It wasn't a big leap to wonder during Saturday's opening night of Neil Young's four-night run of solo acoustic concerts in Hollywood whether Jesus, if he returned to address a modern-day audience, would have to contend with a steady stream of shouts from the back for “Sermon on the Mount!” “Water into wine!” and “Free Bird!” Young fielded a similar barrage of requests ("Cinnamon Girl!" "Down By the River!") and comments ("You're the man!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
When Jonathan Demme was hunting for an actor to play mobster Tony (The Tiger) Russo in his film "Married to the Mob," the name Dean Stockwell wasn't anywhere around. The veteran character actor has been celebrated for his spectacularly creepy pimp in David Lynch's "Blue Velvet," as well as Harry Dean Stanton's loyal sibling in Wim Wenders' "Paris, Texas." But could Stockwell play a Mafia kingpin? "Originally I had a completely different actor in mind," Demme said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Over time, I've come to trust Jonathan Demme's taste in music. There is something both idiosyncratic and astute about the soundtracks of his narrative features, whether a breakout hit from Bruce Springsteen in "Philadelphia," which won an Oscar for original song, or the more subtle alt-rock shadings in "Rachel Getting Married. " But Demme's documentary work carries a special mystique. The director nearly disappears behind the musicians who are so often his subjects and in doing so catches these enigmatic creatures in their natural habitat.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Academy Awards ceremonies just two weeks from tonight, the hottest game in Hollywood is guessing which movie will win best picture. All previous predictions went out the window after Saturday night's surprising announcement that Jonathan Demme won top honors from the Directors Guild of America for his work on the dark thriller "The Silence of the Lambs."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
The new documentary on our 39th president, "Jimmy Carter Man From Plains," is running newspaper advertisements listing the man's accomplishments. Which is a good thing, because you won't find out much about them in the film. As directed by Jonathan Demme, this narrowly cast documentary focuses so exclusively on a publicity tour the former president took in the closing months of 2006 that a more accurate title might be "Jimmy Carter How I Sold My Book."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The Jonathan Demme of "Something Wild" or "Melvin and Howard' or "Stop Making Sense" might not be the first director one would think of for suspense or bloody terror; his touch has always seemed lighter, his interests more quirky and off the mainstream. So much for pigeonholing. Demme's vision of "The Silence of the Lambs," Thomas Harris' truly terrifying novel, is stunning.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2012 | Randy Lewis
"Neil Young Journeys," the new concert film reuniting the idiosyncratic Canadian rocker and director Jonathan Demme, raises the notion of "spitting distance" to a whole new level. While filming Young in concert last year at Massey Hall in Toronto, Demme employed microphone-mounted cameras to capture the performance from unusual angles, including close-ups of Young's mouth. In the middle of the song "Hitchhiker," which traces the musician's life story from his early years in Canada through rock stardom in the U.S., saliva lands directly on the camera lens.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1991 | NIKKI FINKE, Nikki Finke is a frequent contributor to The Times. and
Jonathan Demme, who has spent most of his film career being heralded by critics as America's next great director, remembers a time not too many years ago when it didn't look like he'd be heralded as anything but a failure. Demme, spotted early as one of the rising stars in Roger Corman's school of low-budget filmmaking, got his first big break when he made "Citizens Band" for Paramount Pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There are moments in Jonathan Demme's new documentary,"Neil Young Journeys," when the saying "too close for comfort" comes to mind. The camera drops to focus on the lower half of Young's face mid-song, staying close enough and long enough that it's possible to identify color patterns of browns and grays in the stubble on his chin, to notice what looks to be bridgework on his teeth, to see the spit fly. In those scenes, what he is singing recedes,...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
TORONTO -- Ron Howard and Jay Z aren't names you'd expect to find in the same sentence, much less people you'd figure would one day work together. But 10 days before the hip-hop artist's two-day Made in America music festival in Philadelphia over Labor Day weekend last year, Howard's longtime Imagine Entertainment partner, Brian Grazer, approached him, asking Howard if he'd be interested in making a documentary of the event. "I was very open that A) I've never made a documentary and B)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Watching "André Gregory: Before and After Dinner" often feels like visiting with an elegant, genial, slightly mystifying old friend. Too bad Cindy Kleine, the documentary's producer-director-narrator - and Gregory's wife - didn't better organize this rangy survey of the eclectic actor, theater director, artist and raconteur. While the title references Louis Malle's 1981 classic "My Dinner With André," which Gregory, now 78, co-wrote and starred in with collaborator and pal Wallace Shawn, Kleine spends little time on Gregory's signature screen role.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There are moments in Jonathan Demme's new documentary,"Neil Young Journeys," when the saying "too close for comfort" comes to mind. The camera drops to focus on the lower half of Young's face mid-song, staying close enough and long enough that it's possible to identify color patterns of browns and grays in the stubble on his chin, to notice what looks to be bridgework on his teeth, to see the spit fly. In those scenes, what he is singing recedes,...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2012 | Randy Lewis
"Neil Young Journeys," the new concert film reuniting the idiosyncratic Canadian rocker and director Jonathan Demme, raises the notion of "spitting distance" to a whole new level. While filming Young in concert last year at Massey Hall in Toronto, Demme employed microphone-mounted cameras to capture the performance from unusual angles, including close-ups of Young's mouth. In the middle of the song "Hitchhiker," which traces the musician's life story from his early years in Canada through rock stardom in the U.S., saliva lands directly on the camera lens.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2010 | By Rob Weinert-Kendt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If the dysfunctional, self-medicating characters that populate so much 20th-century drama were to check into rehab or get therapy, would they still be stage-worthy? Eugene O'Neill didn't write "Long Day's Journey Into Recovery" or Tennessee Williams "A Streetcar Named Wellness." But professional help seems the only recourse for Claire, the mother grieving for a dead child in Beth Henley's "Family Week," opening Tuesday at off-Broadway's Lucille Lortel Theatre. The play is set at an isolated recovery center called Pastures, and in Henley fashion it is a comedy about grief, addiction, domestic violence and the specter of suicide.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
The Internet Movie Database, the mighty monarch of cinema sites, lists more than 600 films with the word "wedding" in the title. And no wonder. Where else can the passions of the moment, and recriminations born of unresolved family issues, mix to create the kind of emotional wallop that the best kind of cinema thrives on? And so it is with Jonathan Demme's exceptional "Rachel Getting Married."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Over time, I've come to trust Jonathan Demme's taste in music. There is something both idiosyncratic and astute about the soundtracks of his narrative features, whether a breakout hit from Bruce Springsteen in "Philadelphia," which won an Oscar for original song, or the more subtle alt-rock shadings in "Rachel Getting Married. " But Demme's documentary work carries a special mystique. The director nearly disappears behind the musicians who are so often his subjects and in doing so catches these enigmatic creatures in their natural habitat.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1991 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonathan Demme's thriller "The Silence of the Lambs" has performed box-office magic, holding on to the No. 1 spot in the national box-office rankings five straight weekends since its Valentine's Day release and providing a ray of hope for beleaguered Orion Pictures. But not without engendering its share of controversy along the way.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2008 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Director Jonathan Demme's first fictional feature in nearly five years, "Rachel Getting Married" captures the anxieties of family dynamics and the difficulties of emotional closure. The film is shot in a loose, documentary-like way, and the rangy, exploratory visual style and therapy-infused dialogue caused it to be among the most talked-about films coming out of the Toronto International Film Festival, where it had its North American premiere earlier this month.
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